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Courses in History (HIS)

Lower Division

3. Cities: A Survey of World Cultures (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Survey of urban world cultures, focusing on up to ten cities selected by the instructor. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

4A. History of Western Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Growth of western civilization from late antiquity to the Renaissance. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I, II. McKee

4B. History of Western Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Development of western civilization from the Renaissance to the Eighteenth Century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Landau, Stuart

4C. History of Western Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Development of Western Civilization from the Eighteenth Century to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I, II, III. Campbell, Saler

6. Introduction to the Middle East (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of the major social, economic, political and cultural transformations in the Middle East from the rise of Islam (c. 600 A.D.) to the present, emphasizing themes in religion and culture, politics and society. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Teczan

7A. History of Latin America to 1700 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to the history of Spanish and Portuguese America from the late pre-Columbian period through the initial phase and consolidation of a colonial regime (circa 1700). Topics include conquest, colonialism, racial mixture, gender, and labor systems. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. (I.) C.F. Walker

7B. History of Latin America, 1700-1900 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Latin America from colony to republic. The nature of Iberian colonialism, the causes for independence, the creation of nation states, the difficulties in consolidating these nations, and the rise of Liberalism and export economics in the nineteenth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. (II.) Resendez

7C. History of Latin America, 1900-present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Latin America since the beginning of the 20th century. Themes include export economies, oligarchic rule, crises of depression and war, corporatism, populism revolution and reform movements, cultural and ethnic issues, U.S.-Latin American relations, neo-liberal restructuring. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. (III.) Langland

8. History of Indian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of Indian civilization from the rise of cities (ca. 2000 B.C.) to the present, emphasizing themes in religion, social and political organization, and art and literature that reflect cultural interaction and change. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Sen

9A. History of East Asian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Surveys traditional Chinese civilization and its modern transformation. Emphasis is on thought and religion, political and social life, art and literature. Perspectives on contemporary China are provided. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I, III. Bossler

9B. History of East Asian Civilization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Surveys traditional Japanese civilization and its modern transformation. Emphasis is on thought and religion, political and social life, art and literature. Perspectives on contemporary Japan are provided. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Kim

10A. World History to 1350 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Historical examination of the changing relationship of human societies to one another and to their natural settings through the year 1350, with particular attention to long-term trends and to periodic crises that reshaped the links of culture and nature on a global scale. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Anooshahr

10B. World History, c. 1350-1850 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Major topics in world history from the 14th century to the beginning of the 19th century. Topics will vary but may include oceans as systems of human communication and conflict; the global consequences of “industrious revolutions” in Europe and Asia, etc. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Harris, Stolzenberg

10C. World History III (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Major topics from world history of the 19th and 20th centuries, emphasizing the rise and fall of Western colonial empires; Cold War and the superpowers; the spread of the nation-states; and process of globalization. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II, III. Dickinson, El Shakry

11. History of the Jewish People in the Modern World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Histories and cultures of the Jews since 1492. Topics include: the making of Jewish diasporas, roots of antisemitism, the Holocaust in images and texts, changing ideas of the self, Jews in America, contemporary visions of the Jewish past. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, DD, VL, WC, WE.—(I.) Miller

12. Food and History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of the ways humans have fed themselves from the dawn of humanity to the present. Transformation of plants and animals into food, cooking into cuisine, and ceremony into etiquette. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, OL, VL.—McKee, Resendez

15. Introduction to African History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Examination of the long-range historical context as background to current conditions in Africa. Includes the early development of African civilizations, the slave trade and its abolition, 20th century colonization, and African independent states. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Decker

17A. History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. The experience of the American people from the Colonial Era to the Civil War. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Hartigan-O'Connor, Kelman, Smolenski, Taylor

17B. History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. The experience of the American people from the Civil War to the end of the Cold War. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 17C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Olmsted, Oropeza, Rauchway

72A. Social History of American Women and the Family (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Social and cultural history of women, sex roles and the family from colonial America until the late nineteenth century emphasizing changes resulting from the secularization, commercialization, and industrialization of American society. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—II. Hartigan-O'Connor

72B. Social History of American Women and the Family (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Social and cultural history of women, sex roles, and the family in twentieth-century America, emphasizing female reformers and revolutionaries, working class women, consumerism, the role of media, the “feminine mystique,” changes in family life, and the emergent women’s movement. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—III. Materson

85. Nature, Man, and the Machine in America (4)

Seminar—4 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. History of the attitudes and behavior of Americans toward their natural environment and their technology, from colonial times to the present. No final examination. Limited enrollment. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WE.

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Primarily for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

 Upper Division

101. Introduction to Historical Thought and Writing (5)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of the history of historical thought and writing, analysis of critical and speculative philosophies of history and evaluation of modes of organization, interpretation, and style in historical writing. GE credit: WE.—II. III. (III.) Saler, Stolzenberg

102A-S, X. Undergraduate Proseminar in History (5)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. (A) Ancient; (B) Medieval; (D) Modern Europe to 1815; (E) Europe since 1815; (F) Russia; (G) China to 1800; (H) China since 1800; (I) Britain; (J) Latin America since 1810; (K) American History to 1787; (L) United States, 1787-1896; (M) United States since 1896; (N) Japan; (O) Africa; (P) Christianity and Culture in Europe, 50-1850; (Q) India; (R) Muslim Societies; (S) Education Abroad Program, GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH or SS, WE.; (X) Comparative History, selected topics in cultural, political, economic, and social history that deal comparatively with more than one geographic field. May be repeated for credit. Limited enrollment.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

103. Topics in Historical Research (4)

Discussion—3 hours; individual consultation with instructor; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual research resulting in a research paper on a specific topic in one of various fields of history. May be repeated for credit. GE credit: WE.

104A. Introduction to Historical Research and Interpretation (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: acceptance into History Department Honors Program. Directed reading and research aimed at preparing students to select appropriate topics and methodologies for a senior honors essay and to situate their topics within a meaningful, broad context of historical interpretations. Culminates in the submission of a full prospectus for an honors essay. GE credit: WE.—I. (I.) Anooshahr

104B. Honors Thesis (4)

Tutorial—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 104A. Research in preparation of a senior honors thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: WE.—II.

104C. Honors Thesis (4)

Tutorial—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 104A and 104B. Completion of a senior honors thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: WE.—III.

108. Global Environmental History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Global, comparative study of how environmental change, human perceptions of nature, and manipulations of nature have changed over time. Primary focus post-1500, emphasis on critically analyzing many common ideas of environmental change. Not open for credit to students who have taken History 109A. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS.—Davis

109A. Global Environmental History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Global, comparative study of how environmental change, human perceptions of nature, and manipulations of nature have changed over time. Primary focus post-1500, emphasis on critically analyzing many common ideas of environmental change. GE credit: ArtHum, or SocSci | AH or SS.—Davis

109B. Environmental Change, Disease and Public Health (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Analysis of environmental changes from pre-history to the present and their influence on disease distribution, virulence and public health; many of these changes have been driven by human action and transformations of pathogens have accelerated under globalization. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Div | SE or SS, SL.—I. (I.) Davis

110. Themes in World History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Issues and topics in world history. Topics will emphasize the interaction of diverse regions of the world as well as common patterns of historical change. May be repeated for credit if topic and/or instructor differs. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

110A. Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of the modern world, focusing on struggles between Europeans and colonized peoples; the global formation of capitalism; the creation of nation-states; and the constitution of bourgeois bodies and racial selves in modern societies. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—III. El Shakry

111A. Ancient History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion or paper (student option). History of ancient empires of the Near East and of their historical legacy to the Western world. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Spyridakis

111B. Ancient History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion or paper (student option). Political, cultural and intellectual study of the Greek world from Minoan-Mycenaean period to end of Hellenistic Age. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Spyridakis

111C. Ancient History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion or paper (student option). Development of Rome from earliest times. Rise and fall of the Roman Republic; the Empire to 476 A.D. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. (II.) Spyridakis

112A. Topics in Pre-Modern Jewish History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics in the history of Jews from the Biblical era to the eras of Jewish emancipation. Topics can be framed chronologically (e.g., medieval Jewry) or thematically (e.g., trade and Jewish communities). May be repeated one time for credit. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

112B. Topics in Modern Jewish History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics in the history of Jews from the era of Jewish emancipation to the present. Topics can be framed chronologically or thematically (e.g. Zionism, assimilation, the post Holocaust Diaspora). May be repeated one time for credit. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

112C. History of Jews in the Muslim World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. History of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam from the time of the Prophet Muhammad to the present day. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE.—I. (I.) Miller

113. History of Modern Israel (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Topics include the rise and fall of utopian Zionism, the century-long struggle between Jews and Arabs, the development of modern Hebrew culture, the conflict between religious and secular Jews, and the nature of Israel’s multicultural society. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. Biale

115A. History of West Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Introductory survey of the history of West Africa and/or the Congo region from the earliest times to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115B. History of East and Central Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Introductory survey of the history of east and central Africa from earliest times to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Decker

115C. History of Southern Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 15 recommended. Introductory survey of the history of Southern Africa (including South Africa) from earliest times to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Decker

115D. History and Legacy of Colonialism in Africa (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 115A, 115B or 115C recommended. History of the implementation, development, and legacy of European Colonialism in Africa. A comparison of British, Belgian, French, and Portuguese colonial efforts and impacts. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

115E. The African Slave Trade (4)

Lecture—3 hours; writing—1 hour. History of the African Slave trades, from the early Egyptian and Saharan trades in the pre-modern period to the trans-Atlantic trade (15th-19th century) and the contemporary trafficking of humans. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. (III.) Lawrance

115F. History of North, Horn, Sudan and Nile Valley (North and North-East Africa) (4)

Lecture—4 hours; term paper. This course shall investigate the history of the north and northeast regions of continental Africa, encompassing the Mediterranean Coast, Maghreb, Sahara, Horn of Africa, the Nile Valley and the Sudan, covering the ancient period to the present. May be repeated up to four units for credit when instructor differs. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Miller

116. African History: Special Themes (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: courses 115A and 115B recommended. Themes of African history, such as African states and empires, slave trade, relationship of Egypt to rest of Africa, Bantu origins and migrations, and French policy of Assimilation and Association. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

120. World War II (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. The Second World War from 1931 to 1945 in all of its theaters. Causes, conduct, and consequences of the war including military, political, economic, social, and cultural factors, with special emphasis on battlefield strategy and mobilization of the home front. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE.—I, II, III, IV. (I, II, III, IV.) Rauchway

121A. Medieval History (4)

Lecture/discussion and panel presentations—3 hours. European history from “the fall of the Roman Empire” to the eighth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—McKee

121B. Medieval History (4)

Lecture/discussion and panel presentations—3 hours. European history from Charlemagne to the twelfth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—McKee

121C. Medieval History (4)

Lecture/discussion and panel presentations—3 hours. European history from the Crusades to the Renaissance. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. McKee

122. Selected Themes in Medieval History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Each offering will focus on single major theme, such as medieval agrarian history, feudalism, the family, medieval Italy, or the Crusades. Readings include original sources in English translation and modern works. May be repeated for credit. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

125. Topics in Early Modern European History (4)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 4B recommended. Social and cultural history, 1300-1800. Topics such as medieval and Renaissance Italy, early modern Italy, Ancient Regime France, family and sexuality, and material culture and daily life. May be repeated for credit. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

130A. Christianity and Culture in Europe: 50-1450 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written report or research paper. A history of the ideas and institutions of Christianity and their impact on the late Roman Empire and medieval Europe in terms of outlook on life, art, politics and economics. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

130B. Christianity and Culture in Europe: 1450-1600 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written report or research paper. A history of the Lutheran, Zwinglian-Calvinist, Radical, Anglican, and Catholic Reformations as foundation stones of a new culture in Europe, with special attention to the interconnections between the revival of antiquity and the different reform movements. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Harris

130C. Christianity and Culture in Europe: 1600-1850 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written report or research paper. A survey of the intellectual, cultural and political reorientation of European society in the aftermath of the Wars of Religion. “Secularization” will be discussed in the context of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

131A. Early Modern European History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Prerequisite: courses 4A and 4B recommended. Western European history from about 1350 to about 1500. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Stuart

131B. European History During the Renaissance and Reformation (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of European society, politics, and culture from the late 15th through the early 17th centuries, with particular focus on the Italian and Northern Renaissance, on the Protestant Reformation, and the Catholic Counter Reformation. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Harris

131C. The Old Regime: Absolution, Enlightenment and Revolution in Europe (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of European society, politics, and culture in the 17th and 18th centuries, focusing on religious warfare, absolutism, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment and the growth of religious tolerance, the French Revolution and the collapse of the old regime. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Stuart

132. Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Deviance and crime in early modern Europe, contrasting imaginary crimes, e.g. witchcraft, with “real” crimes such as highway robbery and infanticide. Examines impact of gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and class in processes of criminalization. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Stuart

133. The Age of Ideas (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. The Enlightenment and its background in the seventeenth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Stolzenberg

134A. The Age of Revolution (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Ideas and institutions during the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WE.

135A. History of Science to the 18th Century (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Survey of the historical development of science, technology, and medicine from the ancient world to the eighteenth century, with special emphasis on Isaac Newton as the culmination of the seventeenth century scientific revolution. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Stolzenberg

135B. History of Science, 18th to 20th Centuries (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Survey of the historical development of scientific thought in geology, biology, chemistry, physics, and cosmology from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, with special emphasis on emergence of broad explanatory principles that serve more than one science. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

136. Scientific Revolution (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 135A or 135B recommended. History of science in Western Europe (1400-1750). Investigates the changing definitions of science in the age of Copernicus, Versalius, Harvey, Galileo and Newton. Considers the evolution of new ideas about nature, experiment, observation, and scientific theory. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Stolzenberg

138A. Russian History: The Rise of the First Empire, 1500-1881 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: courses 4B and 4C recommended. Expansion of the Russian state in Muscovite and imperial era. Emphasis on autocratic rule, the incorporation of non-Russian peoples, and emergence of Russia as a Great Power. Only two units of credit will be allowed to students who have completed former course 137B. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

138B. Russian History: The Russian Revolution, 1880-1917 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: courses 4B and 4C recommended. History of the fall of the Russian Empire and of the Revolution of 1917. Not open for credit to students who have received credit for former course 138. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSciArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. Campbell

138C. Russian History: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union, 1917 to the Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: courses 4B and 4C recommended. The emergence of the Soviet Union as a socialist system and a Great Power; the decline and collapse of the Soviet Union and the formation of independent nation states in its place. Not open for credit to students who have completed former course 137C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

139A. Medieval and Renaissance Medicine (4)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours; term paper. The history of medicine, circa 1000-1700. Revival of ancient medicine; role of the universities; development of anatomy, chemistry and natural history; ideas about the body; cultural understanding of disease; hospital and the public health system. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

139B. Medicine, Society, and Culture in Modern Europe (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; term paper. History of European medicine, 18th to 20th centuries, by examining the development of medical knowledge in epidemiology and anatomy; function of this knowledge, how it changed with technological breakthroughs and professionalization; and role of medicine in attitudes toward poverty, women, race, disease. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

140. The Rise of Capitalism in Europe (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 4B or 4C. Comparative analysis of major interpretations of the rise of merchant capitalism during the Middle Ages and Renaissance; European expansion overseas, 1450-1815; the transition to modern capitalism via industrial revolution. Interplay of social, political, cultural, and economic history. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

141. France Since 1815 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

142A. History of the Holocaust (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Topics include comparative genocide, medieval and modern antisemitism, modern German history, the rise of Nazism, Jewish life in Europe before the Nazi period, and the fate of the Jewish communities and other persecuted groups in Europe from 1933-1945. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Biale

142B. The Memory of the Holocaust (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Examination of the literary, philosophical, theological and artistic responses to the Holocaust of the European Jews. Exploration of how memory is constructed, by whom and for what purposes. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Biale

143. History of Eastern Europe and the Balkans (4)

Lecture—3 hours; essays. History of the Baltic, Danubian, and Balkan lands since the Middle Ages. National cultures and conflicts in the Polish Commonwealth and the Habsburg and Ottoman Empires; nationalist movements, 1789-1914; the twentieth century, including an analysis of the contemporary scene. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

144A. History of Germany, 1450 to 1789 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Survey of early modern Germany, 1450 to 1789, covering the theology and social history of the Reformation, the Peasants War of 1525, religious warfare, state building and absolutism, the rise of Prussia, Austro-Prussian dualism, and the German Enlightenment. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

144B. History of Germany since 1789 (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 144A recommended. History of the German lands in the age of the French Revolution; 19th-century liberalism, nationalism, and industrialization; the World Wars, National Socialism, and the Holocaust; east and west Germany in the Cold War; the post-reunification scene. (Not open for credit to students who have completed former course 144.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

145. War and Revolution in Europe, 1789-1918 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of revolutionary movements, international crises, and wars in Europe from the French Revolution to World War I. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

146A. Europe in the Twentieth Century (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the history of Europe from 1919 to 1939. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Dickinson

146B. Europe in the Twentieth Century (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of the history of Europe since 1939. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Dickinson

147A. European Intellectual History, 1800-1870 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. European thought in the early industrial era. Shifting cultural frameworks, from romanticism to scientism; liberal and socialist reactions to social change. Focus on the work of Goethe, Hegel, J.S. Mill, Marx, Darwin and Flaubert. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. Saler

147B. European Intellectual History, 1870-1920 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Cultural and intellectual watershed of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Emergence of modern art and literature; psychoanalysis and the new social sciences. Focus on the work of Baudelaire, Wagner, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber and Kafka. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Saler

147C. European Intellectual History, 1920-1970 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. European thought and culture since World War I. Coverage includes: literature and politics; Communism and Western Marxism; Fascism; Existentialism; Structuralism; Feminism. Particular attention to Lenin, Brecht, Hitler, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Marcuse, Foucault, Woolf and de Beauvoir. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Saler

148A. Women and Society in Europe: 1500-1789 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 4B recommended. Roles and perceptions of women from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Emphasis on social and economic factors as well as on discussions of women in the writings of political theorists and social commentators. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

148B. Women and Society in Europe: 1789-1920 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 4C and 148A recommended. Roles and perceptions of women from the French Revolution to World War I, primarily in France and England. Emphasis on social and economic developments within a loosely chronological and comparative framework. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

148C. Women and Society in Europe: 1914-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 148B recommended. The history of 20th-century Europe from the perspective of women and the family, and of sexual and gender relations. Emphasis on the impact on women of major events and movements, such as World War I, fascism, Soviet communism, World War II, the welfare state, feminism, and mass culture. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

149. Comparative Cultural History of Modern Britain and France, 1880-1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Cultural comparison of the histories of Britain and France during the fin de siecle. Addresses cultural debates of the period (including gender, race, class) and the practices of cultural history. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151A. England: The Middle Ages (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 4A recommended. Origins of England to the accession of the Lancastrians. Survey includes: impact of Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon institutions; rise of the Church, common law, parliament, and the economy; thought, arts, and literature to the age of Chaucer and Wyclif. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151B. England: The Early Modern Centuries (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: courses 4A, 4B; course 151A recommended. From Lancaster and York to the Glorious Revolution. Includes growth of the Church of England; beginnings of modern worldwide economy; rise of the gentry and parliament; thought, arts, and literature in the times of More, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Wren, and Newton. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

151C. Eighteenth-Century England (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. English history from the Glorious Revolution to the French Revolution. Examination of the transformation of one of Europe’s most politically unstable kingdoms into the firmly established constitutional monarchy which provided an environment fit to engender the industrial revolution. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Landau

151D. Industrial England (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. English history from Waterloo to the Battle of Britain; the rise and continuance of the first industrial nation, examining the transformation of landed to class society, oligarchy to democracy and bureaucracy, Bentham to Bloomsbury, empire to commonwealth. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Landau

159. Women and Gender in Latin American History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: one course either on Latin America or in women’s history in another world area. Roles of women and men in the history of Latin America, with an emphasis on the intersection of gender with racial and class categories. Introduction to the theoretical premises of women’s and gender history. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Langland

160. Spain and America in the 16th Century (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. The Atlantic world in the 16th century, particularly the transcultural and reciprocal social and economic relations between Spain and America in the course of colonization. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. Harris

162. History of the Andean Region (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. History of the Andean region, the area that now comprises modern Peru, Bolivia, and Chile, from the beginning of human settlement to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. (III.) C. F. Walker

163A. History of Brazil (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. The history of colonial and imperial Brazil from 1500 to 1889. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

163B. History of Brazil (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. The history of the Brazilian republic from 1889 to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Langland

164. History of Chile (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 161A, 161B, 165, or 168 recommended. Emphasis on the history of Chilean political economy from 1930 to the present. Various strategies of development (modernization, Marxism, Neo-Liberalism); the rise of mass politics; the course of foreign relations; and the richness of Chilean literature. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

165. Latin American Social Revolutions (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Major social upheavals since 1900 in selected Latin American nations; similarities and differences in cause, course, and consequence. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

166A. History of Mexico to 1848 (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Political, economic, and social development of pre-Columbian, colonial and national Mexico to 1848. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

166B. History of Mexico Since 1848 (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. History of Mexico from 1848 to the present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

167. Modern Latin American Cultural and Intellectual History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Introduction to the cultural and intellectual history of modern Latin America including architecture, cinema, painting, music, and literature. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—C.F. Walker, Reséndez

168. History of Inter-American Relations (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written reports. Diplomatic history of Latin America since independence, intra-Latin American relations, relations with the United States, participation in international organizations, and communism in Latin America. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. C.F. Walker

169A. Mexican-American History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Economic, social, religious, cultural and political development of the Spanish-speaking population of the Southwestern United States from about 1800 to 1910. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Oropeza

169B. Mexican-American History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Role of the Mexican and Mexican-American or Chicano in the economy, politics, religion, culture and society of the Southwestern United States since 1910. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—I. Oropeza

170A. Colonial America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Colonial society from 1607 to the American Revolution, with emphasis on European expansion, political, social and economic foundations, colonial thought and culture, and imperial rivalry. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—II. Smolenski, Taylor

170B. The American Revolution (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Analysis of the Revolutionary epoch with emphasis on the structure of British colonial policy, the rise of revolutionary movements, the War for Independence and its consequences, and the Confederation period. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—III. Smolenski, Taylor

170C. The Early National Period, 1789-1815 (4)

Lecture—3 hours. Political and social history of the American republic from the adoption of the Constitution through the War of 1812 and its consequences. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

171A. Jacksonian America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. The political and social history of the United States from the end of the War of 1812 to the Compromise of 1850. How the market revolution transformed American life, and led the nation towards war. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—Kelman

171B. Civil War and Reconstruction (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Examination of the political and social history of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the end of Reconstruction in 1876. Causes of the war, the war itself, and the problems of reconstruction after the war. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—I. Kelman

171BF. The Civil War in American Film (1)

Discussion—1 hour; film viewing. Prerequisite: course 171B concurrently. Viewing and discussion of films with short writing assignments. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: AH or SS.

171D. Selected Themes in 19th Century American History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Interpretative overview of a single topic in the history of the United States in the 19th century. Sample topics include social history, the 1850s, and southern history. May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

172. American Environmental History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17A. Examination of changing relations between people and nature in the area of the current United States from pre-Columbian times to the present. Topics include ecological change; perceptions of nature; social conflicts over “proper” uses of nature; environmental movement. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—II. Warren

173. Becoming an American: Immigration and American Culture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17B or 72B recommended. An introduction to the wide range of immigrant experiences and cycles of nativism that have shaped American culture in the twentieth century. From novels, memoirs and films, students will explore how external and internal immigration has created a multicultural society. Offered alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—I. Tsu

174A. The Gilded Age and Progressive Era: United States, 1876-1917 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17B. U.S. history and the construction of modern America from the end of Reconstruction to U.S. entry into World War I. Includes Southern redemption, Western incorporation, electoral corruption, labor movements, Populism, Progressivism, women’s suffrage, U.S. imperial expansion, and immigration restriction. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—Rauchway

174AD. Emergence of Modern America: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour; short papers. Prerequisite: course 174A concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174A. (P/NP grading only.)

174B. War, Prosperity, and Depression: United States, 1917-1945 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17B. America’s emergence as a world power, the business culture of the 1920s, the New Deal and World War II. Emphasis on such issues as government regulation of the economy, welfare capitalism, and class, racial, ethnic, and gender conflicts. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—II. Olmsted, Rauchway

174BD. America in War, Prosperity and Depression: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour; short papers. Prerequisite: course 174B concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174B. (P/NP grading only.)

174C. The United States Since World War II, 1945 to the Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. America’s struggle to respond to new complexities in foreign relations, social tensions, family changes and media. Emphasis on such topics as: Cold War; anticommunist crusade; civil rights, feminist and environmentalist movement; New Left; counterculture; Vietnam; Watergate; and the moral majority. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—III. Olmsted, Oropeza

174CD. The United States Since World War II: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 174C concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174C. (P/NP grading only.)

174D. Selected Themes in 20th Century American History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17B or the equivalent. Interpretive overview of a single topic in the history of the United States in the 20th century with attention to the phases and processes of historical change. May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—II. Olmsted

174DD. Selected Themes in 20th Century American History: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 174D concurrently. Intensive discussion of topics and readings for course 174D. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

175. American Intellectual History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17B and upper division standing. Ideas that have shaped politics and society in the United States from colonial times to the present. Topics include American liberalism, republicanism, democracy, constitutionalism, communitarianism, utopianism, pragmatism, feminism, Darwinism, nationalism, conservatism, and economics. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—Rauchway

176A. Cultural and Social History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Study of social and cultural forces in American society in the nineteenth century with emphasis on social structure, work and leisure, socialization and the family, social reform movements and changes in cultural values. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—II. Hartigan-O'Connor

176B. Cultural and Social History of the United States (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Study of social and cultural forces in American society in the twentieth century with emphasis on social structure, work and leisure, socialization and the family, social reform movements and changes in cultural values. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.

177A. History of Black People and American Race Relations, 1450-1860 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of black people in the United States from the African background to Reconstruction. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—C.E. Walker

177B. History of Black People and American Race Relations, 1860-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of black people and race relations from 1860-present. Emphasis on Civil War, Reconstruction, Segregation, Age of Accommodation, black nationalism, urbanization, civil rights, and changing ideology of race relations. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—Materson, C.E. Walker

178A. Race in America, 1492-1865 (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 17A or 17B or course 177A or 177B. Racial formation during the Age of Discovery, the Colonial Period, Early National and Antebellum periods up to the Civil War. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 178. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—I. C.E. Walker

178B. Race in America, 1865-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Racial Formation in the Post Civil War. United States from 1860 to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—II. C.E. Walker

179. Asian American History, 1850-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. The historical experience of people of Asian ancestry in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Migration, labor, community formation, race relations, women and gender, popular culture. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—Tsu

180AN. American Political History,
1789-1896 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Growth of American politics from the birth of the republic to the end of the nineteenth century. Development of political parties, the expanding electorate, and how social issues such as slavery shaped the political process. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 180A. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

180BN. American Political History,
1896-present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17B. Politics in the United States from 1896 to the present. Topics include race and partisan politics; communism and anti-communism; the New Deal and the centralization of government; and the rise of the imperial presidency. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 180A or 180C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.

181. Religion in American History to 1890 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 17A. American religious history from colonization through the Gilded Age. Topics include religious diversity in America; native American religion; Protestant evangelism; gender and religion; religion and bigotry; African American religion; religion in the Civil War; and religion’s response to modernization. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—Smolenski

182. Gender and Justice in American History (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper-division standing recommended. Intersection of gender and law in North America from the colonial period through the 20th century. Topics include witchcraft, suffrage, child custody, protective labor laws, regulation of sexuality. Analysis of legal change, trials, and cultural influences. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—Hartigan-O'Connor

183A. The Frontier Experience: Trans-Mississippi West (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. The fur trade, western exploration and transportation, the Oregon Country, the Greater Southwest and the Mexican War, the Mormons, mining discovery, and the West during the Civil War. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—Taylor, Warren

183B. The Frontier Experience: Trans-Mississippi West (4)

Lecture—3 hours; written and/or oral reports. Spread of the mining kingdom, the range cattle industry, Indian-military affairs, settlement of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountain Regions and political organization of the West. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, WE.—I. Warren

184. History of Sexuality in America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. History of sexuality in America from pre-European through the late twentieth century. Topics include birth control, marriage, sexual violence, prostitution, inter-racial relationships, heterosexuality and homosexuality, the feminist, gay, and lesbian liberation movements, AIDS, commercialization of sexuality. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—Materson

185A. History of Science in America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; research paper. Survey of the European background. Study of American scientific institutions, ideas, personalities, creative processes in science, and of relationships between society and science from colonial times to present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WE.

185B. History of Technology in America (4)

Lecture—3 hours; research paper. Study of American technology, emphasizing biographical approach to historical understanding of technological change, creative processes, institutions, ideas, and relationships between technology and society from colonial times to present. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | AH or SS, WE.

188. America in the 1960s (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Tumult and upheaval in American politics, culture, and society 1961-1969. Civil rights; Vietnam, the draft and the anti-war movement; rock and roll and the counterculture; modern feminism; modern conservatism; student movements; urban unrest and insurrection. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SocSci | ACGH, DD, SS, WE.—Kelman, Rauchway

189. California History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing. California history from the pre-colonial period to the present including dispossession of California’s Indians, political economy of the Spanish and Mexican periods, Gold Rush effects, industrialization, Hollywood, water politics, World War II, Proposition 13, and the emergence of the Silicon Valley. Not open for credit to students who have completed two courses of course 189A, 189B, 189C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, AH or SS, DD, WE.—III. Tsu, Warren

190A. Middle Eastern History I: The Rise of Islam, 600-1000 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the disintegration of the Abbasid Caliphate; the formative centuries of a civilization. Politics and religion, conquest and conversion, arts and sciences, Christians, Jews and Muslims, gender and sexuality, orthodoxy and heterodoxy. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Tezcan

190B. Middle Eastern History II: The Age of the Crusades, 1001-1400 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history during the age of the Crusades and Mongol invasions. The idea of holy war, the Crusades, the Mongols as the bearers of Chinese arts, nomads and sedentary life, feudalism, mysticism, slavery, women in the medieval Middle East. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Tezcan

190C. Middle Eastern History III: The Ottomans, 1401-1730 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Middle Eastern history from the foundation of the Ottoman Empire on the borderlands of Byzantine Anatolia through its expansion into Europe, Asia, and Africa, creating a new cultural synthesis including the Arab, Greek, Islamic, Mongol, Persian, Slavic, and Turkish traditions. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Tezcan

190D. Middle Eastern History IV: Safavids Iran, 1300-1720 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Middle Eastern history focusing on Safavid Empire (present-day Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, up to Georgia), beginning with the origins of the dynasty as a powerful religious family, to the establishment of the Empire, focusing on Social, Religious, Economic, and Political History. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Anooshahr

191A. Classical China (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. History of Chinese civilization from its origins through the establishment of city states and the flowering of classical philosophy, to the rise and fall of the First Empire. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191B. High Imperial China (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Political disunion and the influx of Buddhism; reunification under the great dynasties of T’ang, Sung, and Ming with analysis of society, culture and thought. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Bossler

191C. Late Imperial China (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; two long papers. Prerequisite: course 9A or upper division standing. Patterns and problems of Chinese life traced through the Ming and Ch’ing dynasties (c. 1500–1800), prior to the confrontation with the West in the Opium War. Readings include primary sources and novels portraying elite ethos as well as popular culture. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

191D. Nineteenth Century China: The Empire Confronts the West (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; term paper. Prerequisite: course 9A, or upper division standing. The decline and fall of the Chinese Empire, with particular attention to the social and political crises of the 19th century, and the response of government officials, intellectuals, and ordinary people to the increasing pressures of Western imperialism. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Bossler

191E. The Chinese Revolution (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Analysis of China’s cultural and political transformation from Confucian empire into Communist state. Emphasis on emergence and triumph of peasant revolutionary strategy (to 1949), with some attention to its implications for post-revolutionary culture and politics. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II.

191F. History of the People’s Republic of China (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing. Prerequisite: upper division standing. Comprehensive analysis of recent Chinese history, including land reform, the Cultural Revolution, the post-Mao era, and the consequences of the new economic policies of the 1980s. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 190C. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III.

191G. Special Topics in Chinese History to 1800 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 9A or consent of instructor. Topics in the history of China from the beginning of the imperial period through the high Qing dynasty. Topics may be framed chronologically (e.g.,the Ming Dynasty) or thematically (e.g., Trade in early Chinese history). May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly. GE credit: AH, WC, WE.— Bossler, Javers

191H. Special Topics in Chinese History after 1800 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 9A or consent of instructor. Topics in the history of China since 1800. Topics may be framed chronologically (e.g., The Republican Period (1911-1948)) or thematically (e.g., The Modern Evolution of Chinese Law). May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly. GE credit: AH, WC, WE.— Bossler, Javers

191J. Sex and Society in Modern Chinese History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Role of sex, gender, and family relations in the development of Chinese politics, society, and personal life in the modern period, 1900-present. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 190C. Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, WC, WE.—Bossler

192. Internship in History (1-12)

Prerequisite: enrollment dependent on availability of intern positions, with priority to History majors. Supervised internship and study as historian, archivist, curator, or in another history-related capacity, in an approved organization or institution. (P/NP grading only.)

193A. History of the Modern Middle East, 1750-1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. Transformation of state and society within the Middle East from 1750 to 1914 under pressure of the changing world economy and European imperialism. Themes include colonialism, Orientalism, Arab intellectual renaissance, Islamic reform, state-formation, role of subaltern groups. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—El Shakry

193B. History of the Modern Middle East from 1914 (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. The Middle East from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, Palestine/Israel, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war, cultural modernism, exile and diaspora. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—II. El Shakry

193C. The Middle East Environment: Historical Change and Current Challenges (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Prerequisite: upper division standing recommended. Examines Middle East environment and human use of nature over last 10,000 years. Introduction to desert ecology, environmental history and current environmental problems. Case Studies of Egypt, Maghreb countries, Arabian peninsula/Gulf countries, desertification, water, indigenous knowledge, and national parks. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS.—Davis

193D. History of Modern Iran, From 1850 to Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 6 recommended. Modern Iran from the mid 19th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, modernization, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, VL, WC, WE.—Anooshahr

194A. Aristocratic and Feudal Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper and/or discussion. Broad survey of the cultural, social, religious, and political aspects of Japanese history from mythological times through the sixteenth century emphasizing comparison of the organizations, values, and beliefs associated with the aristocratic and feudal periods. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.

194B. Early Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper and/or discussion. Survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of Japanese history from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries emphasizing the development of those patterns of thought and political organization with which Japan met the challenge of the nineteenth-century Western expansionism. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div | AH or SS, WC, WE.—Kim

194C. Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper and/or discussion. Survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of Japanese history in the twentieth century emphasizing labor and social movements, militarism and the Pacific war, and the emergence of Japan as a major economic power. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Kim

194D. Business and Labor in Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Survey of labor and management relations in Japan from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

194E. Education and Technology in Modern Japan (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term papers. Survey of education and technology in Japan from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, WC, WE.

195B. History of Modern Korea (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing. History of Modern Korea, from Yi dynasty period to 1990s. Political and socioeconomic changes in 19th century, modernization under Japanese colonialism, postwar economic growth and effects of the Cold War. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—I. Kim

196A. Medieval India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of history of India in the millennium preceding arrival of British in the eighteenth century, focusing on interaction of the civilizations of Hinduism and Islam and on the changing nature of the state. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—II. Sen

196B. Modern India (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; written reports. Survey of cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of South Asian history from arrival of the British in the eighteenth century to formation of new independent states—India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan—in the twentieth century. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Div, Wrt | AH or SS, WC, WE.—III. Sen

197T. Tutoring in History (2)

Discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: enrolled as a History major with senior standing and consent of department chairperson. Tutoring of students in lower division courses. Weekly meeting with instructors in charge of courses. Written reports on methods and materials required. May be repeated one time for credit. No final examination. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor; upper division standing. (P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

 Graduate

201A-N, P-Q, S-T, W, X. Sources and General Literature of History (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent on instructor. Designed primarily for students preparing for higher degrees in history. (A) Ancient; (B) Medieval; (C) Renaissance and Reformation; (D) Early Modern Europe; (E) Europe since 1815; (F) China to 1880; (G) China since 1880; (H) Britain; (I) Latin America since 1810; (J) American History to 1787; (K) United States, 1787-1896 (L) United States since 1896; (M) Middle East; (N) Modern Japan; (P) African Historiography; (Q) Cross-Cultural Women’s History; (S) History of Science and Medicine; (T) Jewish History; (W) Sources and General Literature of History; (X) World History. May be repeated for credit when different subject area is studied.

202A-I. Major Issues in Historical Interpretation (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Fundamental issues and debates in the study of history. (A) Ancient; (B) Medieval Europe; (C) Modern Europe; (D) India; (E) Africa; (F) China; (G) Japan; (H) United States; (I) Latin America. Readings, papers, and class reports. May be repeated for credit when a different subject area is studied.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

203A. Research Seminar (4)

Seminar—3 hours; tutorial—1 hour. Designed for students preparing for higher degrees in history. Individual research and analysis resulting in substantial research paper of publishable quality. Completion required of all Ph.D. candidates. The three courses must be taken in continuous sequence, ordinarily during second year.—I. (I.)

203B-203C. Research Seminar (4-4)

Seminar—3 hours; tutorial—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 203A. Designed for students preparing for higher degrees in history. Individual research and analysis resulting in substantial research paper of publishable quality. Completion required of all Ph.D. candidates. The three courses must be taken in continuous sequence, ordinarily during second year. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—II, III. (II, III.)

204. Historiography (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Major issues in the philosophy and methodology of history.—I. (I.)

221. Medieval History (4)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 121A, 121B, 121C recommended. Topics in the history of medieval and early Renaissance Europe.

245. Modern European History (4)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 201E. Primary sources and research methodologies in the history of modern France and Germany. May be repeated one time for credit.—III. (III.)

261. Latin American History (4)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: two courses in Latin American history; reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

271A-271B. United States History (4-4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 201J-L or 202H. Research in literature, methods, and sources on aspects of United States history, culminating in each student completing a research paper in the field by the end of the second quarter. May be repeated for credit. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)

291A. Chinese History (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research on topics to be chosen by the students for the purpose of writing article-length papers. May be repeated for credit. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—Bossler

291B. Chinese History (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Completion of article-length papers on topics chosen by students. May be repeated for credit. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—Bossler

291C. Methods and Issues in Chinese History (4)

Seminar—2 hours; tutorial—1 hour. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Chinese; consent of instructor. Readings in Chinese historical materials. Training in the use of Chinese reference works (including on-line resources). May be repeated for credit.—I. (I.) Bossler

292. College Teaching Internship (4)

Internship—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 300 (may be taken concurrently). Student prepares and teaches one lower division history course in a nearby community college under the supervision of a UC Davis instructor and a community college instructor. (S/U grading only.)

298. Group Study (1-5)

299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

299D. Individual Study (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

 Professional

389. Introductory Seminar for Teaching Assistants (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: must be enrolled in course 390. An introduction to the broad comparative and theoretical issues of teaching methods and techniques in history. (S/U grading only.)—I. (I.)

390. Teaching History in College (2)

Discussion—2 hours. Designed for teaching assistants with emphasis on problems and procedures encountered by teachers of lower division classes at the university. (S/U grading only.)

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Updated: July 11, 2014 9:42 AM