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Courses in Community and Regional Development (CRD)

Lower Division

1. The Community (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Basic concepts of community analysis and planned social change. The dynamics of community change through case studies of communities including peasant, urban ghetto, suburban mainline, and California farm workers. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE.—F, W. (F, W.) Tarallo

2. Ethnicity and American Communities (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing; term paper. Historical and cultural survey of the role of various ethnic groups in the development of American communities. Examines ethnicity as a cultural factor, ethnicity as power and issues related to selected American ethnic groups. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, SS, WE.—F, S. (F, S.) 

20. Food Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Social aspects of agri-food systems. Social science perspectives applied to food and agricultural sustainability in relation to ecology, knowledge, technology, power, governance, labor, social difference, and social movements. Social and environmental effects of commodity chains in comparative global context. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | OL, VL, SS, WE.—F. (F.) Galt

92. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Supervised internship, off and on campus, in community and institutional settings. (P/NP grading only.).

98. Directed Group Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

118. Technology and Society (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2. Impact of technology on labor relations, employment, industrial development and international relations. Internal relations of technology development and deployment. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE.—F. (F.) Kenney

140. Dynamics of Regional Development (4)

Lecture—4 hours; extensive writing; term paper; project. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2. Industrial cluster formation and institutions. Technology, labor relations and interfirm linkages in global value chains. California and other regions are used as case studies. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.—W. (W.) Kenney

141. Organization of Economic Space (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2. Globalization and technological restructuring of economic activity focusing on new spatial patterns of production and circulation and their implications for workers, communities and societies, both in the U.S. and around the globe. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE.—F. (F.) 

142. Rural Change in the Industrialized World (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2. Geography of rural environment with emphasis on rural restructuring. Demographics, community, economy, governance, agriculture, and environmental conservation in rural areas of industrialized world. Case studies from and comparisons drawn between North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.—W. (W.) Galt

147. Community Youth Development (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; project; extensive writing or discussion; term paper. Community influences on youth well-being, youth as agents of community change, and policies to support healthy communities for young people. Special emphasis on disparities in youth well-being related to race, class, immigration status, gender, sexual-orientation. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | DD, OL, SS, VL, WE.—S. (S.) London

149. Community Development Perspectives on Environmental Justice (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; extensive writing or discussion; project; term paper. Environmental justice social movements; inequitable distribution of pollution on low-income communities of color; histories, policies, and innovations associated environmental justice movements in the United States and around the world. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | DD, OL, SS, VL, WE.—S. (S.) London

151. Community Field Research: Theory and Analysis (4)

Lecture—4 hours; extensive writing; project. Prerequisite: course 1; any upper division Community and Regional Development course is recommended. Emphasis on the design and analysis of community research considering the relationship between theory and practice. Study of community research methods, including structural analysis, elite interviewing, and ethnographic approaches. Course requires design and completion of field research project. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE.—S. (S.) Tarallo

152. Community Development (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 151 or Sociology 2 or Anthropology 2 or Asian American Studies 100 or Chicana/o Studies 132 or African American & African Studies 101. Introduction to principles and strategies of community organizing and development. Examination of non-profit organizations, citizen participation, approaches to reducing poverty, community needs assessment, and regional development strategies. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE.—F. (F.) Brinkley

153A. International Community Development: Asia (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or Anthropology 2 or International Agricultural Development 10 or Sociology 1 or 2 or Political Science 1. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in Japan and the impact of global forces in different settings. Alternative strategies with emphasis on self-reliance and locally controlled development. Course is based in Kyoto, Japan, and includes field trips. GE credit: SocSci, Div | OL, SS, VL, WC, WE.—Su. (Su.) Fujimoto, Wiener

153B. International Community Development: Europe (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Anthropology 2 or International Agricultural Development 10 or Sociology 1 or 2 or Political Science 1. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in Europe and the impact of global forces in different settings. Alternative strategies with emphasis on self-reliance and locally controlled development. Course is based in Freiburg, Germany, and includes field trips to France and Switzerland. GE credit: SocSci, Div | SS, WC.—Su. (Su.) 

153C. International Community Development: Africa (4)

Lecture—2 hours; fieldwork—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Anthropology 2 or International Agricultural Development 10 or Sociology 1 or 2 or Political Science 1. Examination and analysis of community development efforts in Africa and the impact of global forces in urban and rural settings. Focus on strategies that promote self-reliance and locally controlled development. Course based in South Africa, includes field trips. GE credit: SocSci, Div | SS, WC.—Su. (Su.) 

154. Social Theory and Community Change (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; course 1 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2. Comparative overview of the dominant social science paradigms for the study of community development and change. Among the paradigms discussed are functionalism, conflict theory/Marxism, structuralism, methodological individualism, reflexive modernity. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WC, WE.—F, W. (F, W.) Lacy

156. Community Economic Development (5)

Lecture—4 hours; laboratory—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 152 or Plant Sciences 21 or Engineering Computer Sciences 15; consent of instructor. How low income communities work together to improve their economic well-being, increase their control over their economic lives, and build community power and decision-making. Includes techniques to analyze community economic potential and identification of appropriate intervention tools. Group project. GE credit: SocSci | QL, SS, WE.—W. (W.) 

157. Politics and Community Development (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Analyzes political, economic and sociocultural forces shaping the form and function of local communities in the U.S. Considers theories of the state, the community and social change and case studies of actual community development in comparative historical perspective. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, SS, WE.—F. (F.)

158. Small Community Governance (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; fieldwork—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or Sociology 1 or Political Science 1. Governing institutions and political processes in rural and small urban places. Local government organization, community autonomy, leadership, political change, policy development, and select policy issues including public finance. Field research on political processes or policy issues in select communities. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) London

162. People, Work and Technology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2; upper division standing recommended. Restricted to upper division standing. Analysis of the relationship between work, technology, and human experience. Theories of the causes and consequences of labor process change; impacts of race/ethnicity, class, gender, and citizenship status on work; responses of workers, communities, and policy-makers to workplace changes.—F, W. (F, W.) Visser

164. Theories of Organizations and Their Roles in Community Change (5)

Lecture—4 hours; laboratory—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2; Statistics 13 or 13V or Sociology 46B. Planned change within and through community organizations. Private voluntary organizations, local community associations, and local government. Relationship between community organizations and social capital. Collaborative original data gathering and professional report writing. GE credit: SocSci | ACGH, DD, OL, SS, VL, WE.—W. (W.) Brinkley

171. Housing and Social Policy (4)

Lecture—4 hours; term paper. Social impact, economics, and politics of housing in the United States. Special attention given to federal, state, and local policy and program strategies to produce and preserve affordable housing and inclusive neighborhoods.—S. (S.) Wiener

172. Social Inequality: Issues and Innovations (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; extensive writing; term paper; project. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2; upper division standing recommended. Focus on the dimensions, causes, and means of alleviating social inequality in the U.S. Examination and analysis of major theories and forms (class, race/ethnicity, gender, and citizenship status) of inequality. Policy-based and grassroots approaches to change.—S. (S.) Visser

176. Comparative Ethnicity (4)

Lecture—4 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or Sociology 1 or Anthropology 2 and upper division standing recommended. Role of ethnicity in shaping social systems and interaction. Analytical approaches to and issues arising from the study of ethnicity, through utilization of data from a range of different societies. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, SS, WC, WE.—S. (S.) Guarnizo

180. Transnational Community Development (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; extensive writing; project; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1, or Anthropology 2, or Sociology 1. The effects of grassroots, non-state, non-corporate actors from abroad on local, national and international development. Socioeconomic, political, and cultural implications of transnational actions undertaken by international non-governmental organizations, individual migrants, and migrant grassroots civic organizations. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WC, WE.—S. (W.) Guarnizo

192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: completion of 84 units and consent of instructor. Supervised internship, off and on campus, in community and institutional settings. (P/NP grading only.)

194HA. Special Study for Honors Students (4)

Independent study—3 hours; seminar—1 hour; project; term paper. Prerequisite: completion of 135 units at the time of enrollment; GPA 3.500 in the major; GPA 3.300 in overall standing; completion of at least four upper division courses; agreement of a faculty member to serve as thesis adviser; consent of instructor. Community and Regional Development Honors is a program of direct reading, research and writing culminating in the preparation of a Senior Honors Thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—F, W. (F, W.) Kenney

194HB. Special Study for Honors Students (4)

Independent study—3 hours; seminar—1 hour; project; term paper. Prerequisite: completion of 135 units at the time of enrollment; GPA 3.500 in the major; GPA 3.300 in overall standing; completion of at least four upper division courses; agreement of a faculty member to serve as thesis adviser; consent of instructor. Community and Regional Development Honors is a program of direct reading, research and writing culminating in the preparation of a Senior Honors Thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—F, W. (F, W.) Kenney

197T. Tutoring in Community and Regional Development (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing; completion of course to be tutored; consent of instructor. Assisting instructor in one of the Community and Regional Development's regular courses by tutoring individual students or small groups of students in a laboratory, in voluntary discussion groups, or other voluntary activities. May be repeated up to 10 units for credit. Offered irregularly. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. 

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Graduate

240. Community Development Theory (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Introduction to theories of community development and different concepts of community, poverty, and development. Emphasis on building theory, linking applied development techniques to theory, evaluating development policy, and examining case studies of community development organizations and projects. (Same course as Geography 240.)—F. (F.) 

241. The Economics of Community Development (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Economic theories and methods of planning for communities. Human resources, community services and infrastructure, industrialization and technological change, and regional growth. The community's role in the greater economy. (Same course as Geography 241.) Offered irregularly.—Kenney

242. Community Development Organizations (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 240. Class size limited to 15 students. Theory and praxis of organizations with social change agendas at the community level. Emphasis on non-profit organizations and philanthropic foundations.—S. (S.) Hirtz

242S. Community Development Organizations (International) (4)

Fieldwork—10 hours; lecture—5 hours; workshop—5 hours. Prerequisite: course 240. Class size limited to 10 students. Theory and praxis of organizations with social change agendas at the community level. Emphasis on local governance, non-profit organizations and philanthropic foundations at an international level.—Su. (Su.) Hirtz

244. Political Ecology of Community Development (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Community development from the perspective of geographical political ecology. Social and environmental outcomes of the dynamic relationship between communities and land-based resources, and between social groups. Cases of community conservation and development in developing and industrialized countries. (Same course as Geography 254.)—W. (W.) Galt

245. The Political Economy of Urban and Regional Development (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 157, 244, or the equivalent. How global, political and economic restructuring and national and state policies are mediated by community politics; social production of urban form; role of the state in uneven development; dynamics of urban growth and decline; regional development in California. (Same course as Geography 245.)—S. (S.) 

246. The Political Economy of Transnational Migration (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Theoretical perspectives and empirical research on social, cultural, political, and economic processes of transnational migration to the U.S. Discussion of conventional theories will precede contemporary comparative perspectives on class, race, ethnicity, citizenship, and the ethnic economy. (Same course as Geography 246.)—W. (W.) Guarnizo

247. Transformation of Work (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in history or social science degree program or consent of instructor. Exploration of the ways that the experience, organization, and systems of work are being reconfigured in the late twentieth century. The impacts of economic restructuring on local communities and workers.—F. (F.) Visser

248. Social Policy, Welfare Theories and Communities (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Theories and comparative histories of modern welfare states and social policy in relation to legal/normative, organizational, and administrative aspects. Analysis of specific social issues within the U.S./California context. Not open for credit to students having completed Community & Regional Development 248A and 248B. (Same course as Geography 248.) Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Hirtz

248A. Social Policy, Welfare Theories and Communities I (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Theories and comparative histories of modern welfare states. Theories of welfare and social policy in relation to normative, organizational, and administrative aspects of welfare and social policy. Offered in alternate years.—Hirtz

248B. Social Policy, Welfare Theories and Communities II (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Concurrent enrollment in course 248A. Analysis of a specific set of social issues within the U.S./California context. Issues may include poverty, hunger, housing, health, family, disability, economic opportunity, affirmative action orientations, gender, old age, or special social groups. Offered in alternate years.—Hirtz

249. Media Innovation and Community Development (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Restricted to graduate students. Role of innovative media in communities and social change. Studies historical, practical and theoretical issues involving media in community organizing, social justice movements, democracy initiatives, and economic justice.—S. (S.) 

250. Professional Skills for Community Development (4)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours; project—2 hours; fieldwork; extensive writing or discussion. Prerequisite: course 240. Priority enrollment for Masters and Ph.D. students in Community and Regional Development. Help students develop the practical skills needed to work professionally in organizations that are involved in community development. Provides an overview of community development planning, project management, and consultation skills.—W. (W.) Benner, Hirtz, London

290. Seminar (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Analysis of research in applied behavioral sciences. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. Hirtz

292. Graduate Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Individually designed supervised internship, off campus, in community or institutional setting. Developed with advice of faculty mentor. (S/U grading only.)

293. Community Development Graduate Proseminar (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: enrollment in Community Development graduate group. Restricted to first year Community Development graduate students only. Introduction to graduate training in Community Development. Seminar designed to introduce students entering graduate work in the Community Development Graduate Group to its ongoing activities. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.) Galt

298. Group Study (1-5)

299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM