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Courses in Cinema & Technocultural Studies (CTS)

Lower Division

12. Introduction to Media Computation (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion/laboratory—1 hour. Introduction to key computational ideas necessary to understand and produce digital media. Fundamentals of programming are covered as well as analysis of how media are represented and transmitted in digital form. Aimed primarily at non-computer science students. (Same course as Engineering: Computer Science 012.) GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng | AH or SE, VL. —W. (W.) Neff

20. Filmmaking Foundations (5)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours; film viewing—2 hours; project. Prerequisite: recommended: course 5/Technocultural Studies 5 and/or Film Studies 1. Introduction to filmmaking concepts, principles, and methods. Hands-on exercises build critical and creative capacities. Emphasis on form, content and the historical dialectic between classical narrative filmmaking conventions and artists' challenges to these conventions. Weekly Lab, Lab Preparation, and Evening Screening. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, VL.—F. (F.)  Wyman

40A. Media History 1, Guttenberg to Oppenheimer (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—2 hours; extensive writing. History of Media to 1945, with particular focus on mechanically reproduced mass media technologies including the printing press, the newspaper, photography, cinema, radio and early computing technology. Analysis of inter-related cultural and political topics. (Same Course As: Science and Technology Studies 40A.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.—F. (F.) 

40B. Media History 2 1945-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1hour; film viewing—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 40A. History of media from 1945 to present, with particular focus on the development of the computer, digital network and internet technologies in the context of other media infrastructures like radio, television and satellite networks. Analysis of inter-related cultural/political topics. (Same course as Science & Technology Studies 40B.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.—F. (F.)  

41A. History of Cinema from 1895 to 1945 (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—3 hours; extensive writing. Examination of the cultural context of the emergence of cinema. Discussion of cinema as a product of the age of industrialization and conquest, as well as an element of urban culture, and mass transportation. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.

41B. History of Cinema from 1945 to the present (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—3 hours; extensive writing. Examination of cinema in the postwar period. Study of world cinema trends and the economic and socio-political conditions enabling innovative work in the film industry. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.

Upper Division

116. Design on Screen (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—2 hours. Analysis of the contribution of outstanding designers for cinema, television and filmed entertainment. Study of diverse aesthetic theories of production design and art direction, costume design, or cinematography. Introductory principles and practice, history. May be repeated two times for credit when topic differs. (Same course as Dramatic Art 116.) Offered irregularly. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, VL.—Iacovelli, Morgan

124E. Costume Design for Film (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: for Dramatic Art majors; Dramatic Art 24 or 124D or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of the art and business of film costume design. Script analysis, costume research, developing design concepts, budgeting, and current production practices and methods. Execution of designs for period and contemporary films. Viewing of current films. (Same course as Dramatic Art 124E.) GE credit: ArtHum | AH, OL, VL.—W. (W.) Morgan

146A. Modern Iranian Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: upper-division standing, or consent of instructor. Iranian cinema of the 20th century in the context of profound cultural and social changes in Iran especially since the Iranian Revolution. Produc­tions by representative directors such as Kiarostami, Makhmalbaf, Bahram Beizaie are included. Knowl­edge of Persian not required. (Same course as Mid­dle East/South Asia Studies 131A.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—(S.) 

147A. Chinese Film (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: History 9A or any course on traditional China; upper division standing. English language survey of Chinese film, from its inception to the end of the twentieth century. Chinese films as important texts for understanding national, transnational, racial, gender, and class politics of modern China. (Same course as Chinese 101.) GE credit: ArtHum, Div | AH, VL, WC.—S. (S.) Chen

148B. Japanese Literature on Film (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Survey of films based on works of Japanese literature, emphasis on pre-modern and early modern texts. Introduction to major directors of Japan, with a focus on cinematic adaptation. Lectures and readings in English. Films in Japanese with English subtitles. (Same course as Japanese 156.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE. —(S.) Sorensen

150. Media Theory (5)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—3 hours; extensive writing. Critical and theoretical approaches to the emergence of new technologies since the invention of photography. Examine various approaches to media (formalist, semiotic, structuralist, Frankfurt School, cybernetics, visual and gamer theory). (Same course as Science and Technology Studies 151.) GE credit: AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.

162. Surveillance Technologies and Social Media (4)

Lecture—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: Technocultural Studies 1 or course 20. Study of the ubiquitous presence of CCTV, face recognition software, global tracking systems, biosensors, and data mining practices that have made surveillance part of our daily life. Exploration of the boundary between security and control, information and spying. (Same course as Science & Technolody Studies 162.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ACGH, AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.—Ravetto

172. Video Games and Culture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Technocultural Studies 1 or English 3 or Science and Technology Studies 1 or equivalent. Critical approaches to the study of video games, focusing on formal, historical, and cultural modes of analysis. History of software and hardware in North American and global contexts. Relations of games to society, politics, economics, literature, media, and the arts. (Same course as Science and Technology Studies 172 and English 172.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, VL.

174. Acting for Camera (4)

Lecture/laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis and practice of acting skills required for camera work and digital media. May be repeated eight times for credit when instructor differs. (Same course as Dramatic Art 174.)—S. (S.) Anderson, Merlin

Courses in Film Studies (FMS)

Lower Division

1. Introduction to Film Studies (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—3 hours. Analysis of film form and narrative, including cinematography, editing, and sound. Issues in film studies, including authorship, stardom, race, gender, class, and cultural identity. Includes introduction to selected cinematic movements and national film traditions. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)—Fisher, Lu, Ravetto-Biagioloi, Smoodin

45. Vampires and Other Horrors in Film and Media (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—3 hours. History of representations of vampires and horror generally from the 19th through 21st centuries. Emphasis on transnational history of the horror genre; psychologies of horror effects; issues of race, gender, and class; intersections with prejudice, medicine, modernity. (Same course as German 45.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum | ACGH, AH, DD, OL, VL, WC, WE.—W, S. Fisher

90X. Lower Division Seminar (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing and consent of instructor. Study of a special topic in film studies in a small class setting. May be repeated for credit if topic differs. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

92. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Supervised internship off and on campus in areas of Film Studies. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

120. Italian-American Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. Exploration of representations of Italian-American identity in American (U.S.) cinema. Analysis of both Hollywood and independently produced films, especially as they represent ethnicity, gender, and social class of Italian Americans. Not open for credit to students who have completed Humanities 120. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | ACGH, AH, DD, OL, VL, WC, WE.—S. (S.) Heyer-Caput, Schiesari

121. New Italian Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 and upper- division standing, or consent of instructor. Italian cinema of the 21st century in the context of profound cultural and social changes in Italy since World War II. Productions by representative directors such as Amelio, Giordana, Moretti, Muccino are included. Knowledge of Italian not required. (Same course as Italian 121.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—S. Heyer-Caput

121S. New Italian Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 and upper- division standing, or consent of instructor. Italian cinema of the 21st century in the context of profound cultural and social changes in Italy since World War II. Productions by representative directors such as Amelio, Giordana, Moretti, Muccino are included. Knowledge of Italian not required. (Same course as Italian 121S.) GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—F, S. (F, S.) Heyer-Caput

124. Topics in U.S. Film History (4)

Lecture—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. Study of an aspect of American film history (such as the silent era; the studio system; U.S. avant-garde cinema), including the influences of technological, economic, regulatory, cultural, and artistic forces. Not open for credit to students who have completed Humanities 124 unless topic differs. May be repeated two times for credit if topic differs. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | ACGH, AH, DD, OL, VL, WE.—S. (S.) Clover, Fisher, Simmon, Smoodin

125. Topics in Film Genres (4)

Lecture—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. A study of one or more of the film genres (such as the documentary, the musical, film noir, screwball comedy, or the western), including genre theory and the relationship of the genre(s) to culture, history, and film industry practices. Not open for credit to students who have completed Humanities 125 unless topic differs. May be repeated two times for credit if topic differs. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WE.—W. (W.) Clover, Constable, Fisher, Ravetto-Biagioli, Simmon, Smoodin

127. Film Theory (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or consent of instructor. Survey of the conceptual frameworks used to study film (including semiotics, psychoanalysis, spectatorship, auteur, genre and narrative theories). Historical survey of major film theorists. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—S. (S.) Fisher, Ravetto-Biagioloi

129. Russian Film (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of Subject A requirement. History of Russian film; film and social revolution, the cult of Stalin, dissident visions; film and the collapse of the Soviet empire; gender and the nation in Russian film. Course taught in English; films are in Russian with English subtitles. (Same course as Russian 129.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, VL, WC, WE.—W.

142. New German Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. German filmmakers of the 1960s-1980s such as Fassbinder, Herzog, Syberberg, Brückner, Schlöndorf, Kluge, Wenders. Knowledge of German not required. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (Same course as German 142) GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—F. (F.) Fisher

176A. Classic Weimar Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: Humanities 1. German Weimar (1919-1933) cinema. Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau, and G.W. Pabst among others. Influence on world-wide (esp. Hollywood) film genres such as film noir, horror, science fiction, and melodrama. Not open for credit to students who have completed Humanities 176. (Same Course as German 176A.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—F. Fisher

176B. Postwar German Cinema (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. Exploration of German cinema from 1945 to 1980, when the Nazi past was a central theme. Includes study of postwar "rubble films," escapist "homeland films," and New German Cinema of the 1970s (including films by Fassbinder, Kluge, Syberberg, and Herzog). Not open for credit to students who have completed Humanities 177. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—W. 

189. Special Topics in Film Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1, upper division standing, or consent of instructor. Group study of a special topic in film, focusing on a national tradition, a major filmmaker, or a specific era. May be repeated three times for credit. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WE. —F, S. (F, S.) Clover, Constable, Fisher, Heyer-Caput, Lu, Simmon, Smoodin

190X. Upper Division Seminar (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instructor. Study of a special topic in film studies in a small class setting. May be repeated for credit if topic differs. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

192. Internship (1-12)

Supervised internship off and on campus in areas of Film Studies. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

194H. Special Study for Honors Students (1-5)

Variable—1-5 hours; independent study—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing; GPA of at least 3.500; consent of instructor. Guided research on a topic in Film Studies in preparation for the writing of an honors thesis in course 195H or the creation of an honors project in course 196H. May be repeated two times for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

195H. Honors Thesis (1-5)

Independent study—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: course 194H and consent of instructor; GPA of at least 3.500; senior standing. Writing of an honors thesis on a topic in Film Studies under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated two times for credit. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: AH, VL, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

196H. Honors Project (1-5)

Project—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: course 194H and consent of instructor; GPA of at least 3.500; senior standing. Creation of an honors film, video, or mixed-media project under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated two times for credit. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: AH, VL, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

197T. Tutoring in Film Studies (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: consent of program director. Leading of small voluntary discussion groups affiliated with one of the Program's regular courses. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Professional

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit (S/U grading only.)

Courses in Technocultural Studies (TCS)

Lower Division

1. Introduction to Technocultural Studies (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Contemporary developments in the fine and performing arts, media arts, digital arts, and literature as they relate to technological and scientific practices. GE credit: ArtHum | AH, VL, WE.—Ostertag

5. Media Archaeology (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Evolution of media technologies and practices beginning in the 19th Century as they relate to contemporary digital arts practices. Special focus on the reconstruction of the social and artistic possibilities of lost and obsolete media technologies. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng | AH or SE, VL, WE.

7A. Technocultural Workshop; Digital Imaging (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Workshops in technocultural digital skills; Digital Imaging. Offered irregularly. GE credit: VL.—F, Su. (F, Su.) 

7B. Technocultural Workshop; Digital Video (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Workshops in technocultural digital skills; Digital Video. Offered irregularly. GE credit: VL.—F, Su. (F, Su.) 

7C. Technocultural Workshop; Digital Sound (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Workshops in technocultural digital skills; Digital Sound. Offered irregularly. GE credit: VL.—F, Su. (F, Su.) 

7D. Technocultural Workshop; Web Design (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Workshops in technocultural digital skills; Web Design. GE credit: VL.

7E. Technocultural Workshop; Topics in Digital Production (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Workshops in technocultural digital skills; Topics in Digital Production. May be repeated for credit. Offered irregularly. GE credit: VL.—S, Su. (S, Su.) 

Upper Division

100. Experimental Digital Cinema I (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Experimental approaches to the making of film and video in the age of digital technologies. Opportunities for independent producers arising from new media. Instruction in technical, conceptual and creative skills for taking a project from idea to fruition. GE credit: VL.—Wyman

101. Experimental Digital Cinema II (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100. Continuation of course 100 with further exploration of digital cinema creation. Additional topics include new modes of distribution, streaming, installation and exhibition. GE credit: VL.—Wyman

103. Interactivity and Animation (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Fundamentals of creating interactive screen-based work. Theories of interactivity, linear versus non-linear structures, and audience involvement and participation. Use of digital production tools to produce class projects. GE credit: VL.—Drew

104. Documentary Production (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Prerequisite: course 7B or equivalent proficiency, course 155. Traditional and new forms of documentary, with focus on technocultural issues. Skills and strategies for producing work in various media. Progression through all stages of production, from conception through post-production to critique. GE credit: VL.—Drew, Wyman

110. Object-Oriented Programming for Artists (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. Introduction to object-oriented programming for artists. Focus on understanding the metaphors and potential of object-oriented programming for sound, video, performance, and interactive installations. GE credit: VL.—S. Ostertag

111. Community Media Production (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Use of video and new media tools to address social issues among neighborhood and community groups. Students will use basic video, sound, and lighting techniques as they work with local groups in a group video project. GE credit: VL.—S. (S.)

112. New Radio Features and Documentary (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. New feature and documentary production for radio and other audiophonic media, including audio streaming Web sites and installation. Emphasis on new and experimental approaches to audio production for broadcast on community radio and in international arts programming.

113. Community Networks (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Impact and implications of computer- based networks in community, civic, and social life. Subjects may include community-access computer sites, neighborhood wireless networks, the digital divide, open-source software, and citizen action.

115. Electronics for Artists (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1. Creative application of electronic technology relevant to media and fine arts involving both electronic principles and hands-on application.—S. (S.) Drew

120. History of Sound in the Arts (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1. A survey of the use of sound, voice, noise, and modes of listening in the modernist, avant-garde, and experimental arts, from the late 19th Century to the present. Focus on audiophonic and audiovisual technologies.—Kahn

121. Introduction to Sonic Arts (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; lecture/laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 7C. Introduction to the use of sound within the arts. Techniques and aesthetics of experimental contemporary practices. Creation of original sound works.—Ostertag

122. Intermediate Sonic Arts (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 121, 170C. Techniques of recording, editing, mixing, and synthesis to combine voice, field recordings, and electronic signals. Incorporating live, recorded, and found sounds to create multidimensional stories. Presentation of live performances, audio recordings, and sound installations.—Ostertag

123. Sight and Soundtrack (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 7C, 170C. The use of sound to articulate, lend mood or subconsciously underscore visual, environmental or performative situations, combining music, voice, sound effects and other noises to create sound designs that enhance, alter or support action and movement.—Ostertag

125. Advanced Sound: Performance and Improvisation (4)

Workshop—3 hours; practice—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 121 and 122 or consent of instructor. Culmination of TCS sound courses. Class will focus on performance and improvisation, culminating in a final public performance. Students will be expected to do extensive reading and rehearsal outside of class time.—S. (S.) Ostertag

130. Fundamentals of 3D Computer Graphics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. A foundation course that teaches students the theory of three dimensional computer graphics, including modeling, rendering and animation. Development of practical skills through the use of professional software to create computer graphics.—F. (F.) Neff

131. Character Animation (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 130 or consent of instructor. The art of character animation in three dimensional computer animation. Movement theory, principles of animation, animation timing. Development of technical and practical skills.—S. (S.) Neff

150. Introduction to Theories of the Technoculture (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Major cultural theories of technology with emphasis on media, communications, and the arts. Changing relationships between technologies, humans, and culture. Focus on the evolution of modern technologies and their reception within popular and applied contexts. GE credit: ArtHum |VL.—Dyson

151. Topics in Virtuality (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1. Social, political, economic, and aesthetic factors in virtual reality. Artificial environments, telepresence, and simulated experience. Focus on contemporary artists' work and writing. GE credit: VL.—Dyson

152. New Trends in Technocultural Arts (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Current work at the intersection of the arts, culture, science, and technology including biological and medical sciences, computer science and communications, and artificial intelligence and digital media. GE credit: VL.—Dyson

153. Concepts of Innovative Soundtracks (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Innovative and unconventional soundtracks in cinema, media arts, and fine arts. Introduction to basic analytical skills for understanding sound-image relationships.—Kahn

154. Outsider Machines (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Invention, adaptation and use of technologies outside the mainstream, commonsense, and the possible. Topics include machines as metaphor and embodied thought, eccentric customizing and fictional technologies. GE credit: VL.

155. Introduction to Documentary Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Recent evolution of the documentary. The personal essay film; found-footage/appropriation work; non-linear, multi-media forms; spoken word; storytelling; oral history recordings; and other examples of documentary expression. GE credit: ArtHum  | ACGH, AH, DD, VL.—F. (F.) Drew

158. Technology and the Modern American Body (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1 and either American Studies 1A or 5. The history and analysis of the relationships between human bodies and technologies in modern society. Dominant and eccentric examples of how human bodies and technologies influence one another and reveal underlying cultural assumptions. (Same course as American Studies 158.) GE credit: ArtHum | ACGH, AH, WE.—de la Pena

159. Media Subcultures (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Relationships between subcultural groups and media technologies. Media as the cohesive and persuasive force of subcultural activities. List-servs, Web sites, free radio, fan 'zines, and hip-hop culture. GE credit: Div | ACGH, VL.—W. (W.) Drew

160. Ghosts of the Machine: How Technology Rewires our Senses (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Historical, aesthetic and critical approaches to how information technologies produced ghost effects or a sense of terror in response to new media like the photograph, gramophone, film, typewriter, computer, Turing Machine. Focus on technological media transforms sense perception. (Same course as Science and Technology Studies 160.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, VL, WE.—Ravetto-Biagioli

170A. Advanced Technocultural Workshop (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 7A or the equivalent. Workshop in advanced technocultural digital skills: Digital Imaging. GE credit: VL.

170B. Advanced Technocultural Workshop (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 7B. Workshop in advanced technocultural digital skills: Digital Video. GE credit: VL.

170C. Advanced Technocultural Workshop (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 7C. Workshop in advanced technocultural digital skills: Digital Sound. GE credit: VL.

170D. Advanced Technocultural Workshop (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 7D. Workshop in advanced technocultural digital skills: Web Design. GE credit: VL.

170E. Advanced Technocultural Workshop (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Workshop in advanced technocultural digital skills: Topics in Digital Production. GE credit: VL.

175. Small Scale Film Production (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Lecture and intensive workshop teaching small-scale film production. Appointments as a(n) director, director of photography, actor, writer, lighting designer, sound designer and other critical positions are used to produce and submit a short film to a film festival. (Same course as Dramatic Art 175.) May be repeated two times for credit.—S. (S.) Anderson, Drew

190. Research Methods in Technocultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; project. Introduction to basic research methods for Technocultural Studies: electronic and archived images, sounds and data, satellite downlinking, radiowave scanning, and oral histories. GE credit: VL, WE.—Drew

191. Writing Across Media (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Introduction to experimental approaches to writing for different media and artistic practices. How written texts relate to the images, sounds, and performances in digital and media production. GE credit: WE.—Jones

192. Internship (1-4)

Internship—3-12 hours. Supervised internship on or off campus in area relevant to Technocultural Studies. May be repeated two times for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

197T. Tutoring in Technocultural Studies (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Undergraduates assist the instructor by tutoring students in one of the department's regularly scheduled courses. May be repeated for credit up to eight units. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Guided study with faculty member in independent scholarly activity. May be repeated for credit up to eight units.
(P/NP grading only.)

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Updated: November 21, 2017 12:17 PM