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Courses in Engineering: Mechanical (EME)

Lower Division

1. Mechanical Engineering (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Description of the field of mechanical engineering with examples taken from industrial applications, discussions of the practice with respect to engineering principles, ethics, and responsibilities. (P/NP grading only.)—F. (F.) 

5. Computer Programming for Engineering Applications (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16A or 21A (may be taken concurrently). Structured programming in C for solving problems in engineering. Introduction to MATLAB and comparison study of C/C++ with MATLAB. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 124. GE credit: QL, SE, SL, VL.—F. (F.) Cheng

50. Manufacturing Processes (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in: Engineering 4 and Physics 9A. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science Engineering majors. Modern manufacturing methods, safety, manufacturing instructions, computer-aided manufacturing and their role in the engineering design and development process. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F, W, Su. (F, W, Su.) Farouki, Linke, Soshi

92. Internship in Mechanical Engineering (1-5)

Internship. Prerequisite: lower division standing; approval of project prior to period of internship. Supervised work-study experience in engineering. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

97TC. Mentoring and Tutoring Engineering in the Community (1-4)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Mentoring, coaching, tutoring and/or supervision of students in K-12 schools in Engineering-related topics. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor; lower division standing. (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

106. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 103 and 105. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science Engineering majors. Inviscid incompressible flow, compressible flow, ideal gas mixtures, psychrometrics, reacting mixtures and combustion. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Aldredge, Kennedy, Park

108. Measurement Systems (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 100 and Engineering 102; Engineering 104 recommended. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science & Engineering and Mechanical/Materials Science & Engineering. Stability of flexible systems. Introduction to fluid-structure interaction. Mechanical vibrations. Experiments to illustrate principles of mechanical systems. Theory of measurements; Signal analysis; Demonstration of basic sensors for mechanical systems; Experimental project design; Experiments involving voltage measurement; strain gauges, dynamic systems of 0th, 1st and 2nd order. Three units of credit for students who have previously taken Biomedical Engineering 111; two units of credit for students who have previously taken Biological Systems Engineering 165; one unit of credit allowed for students who have completed course 107B (former version of course 108). GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Erickson, Hill, Horsley, La Saponara

109. Experimental Methods for Thermal Fluids (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—1.5 hours; discussion—1 hour; extensive writing. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in course 106. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science & Engineering and Mechanical/Materials Science Engineering Majors. Experiments to illustrate principles of thermal-fluid systems. Statistical and uncertainty analysis of data; statistical design of experiments; measurement devices; experiments involving thermodynamic cycles, combustion, compressible and incompressible flows. Not open for credit to students who have completed Chemical Engineering 150A. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Aldredge, Davis, Delplanque, Hwang, Kennedy, Robinson

115. Introduction to Numerical Analysis and Methods (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in: Engineering 6 or course 5 or Computer Science Engineering 30 or Chemical and Materials Science Engineering 6; C- or better in: Mathematics 21A, 21B, 21C, 21D, 22A, 22B; C- or better in: Physics 9A, 9B, 9C. Number representation, Taylor expansions, error and stability analysis, roots of nonlinear equations, sets of linear equations, numerical integration, ordinary differential equations. Not open for credit to students who have taken Applied Science Engineering 115. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W. (F, W.) Jensen

121. Engineering Applications of Dynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 102; C- or better in Engineering 6 or course 5 or Computer Science Engineering 30. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science Engineering majors. Technical elective that revisits dynamic principles with emphasis on engineering applications; stressing importance of deriving equations of motion and setting these into format for computer solution with computer simulation lab, students gain experience with solving complex, real engineering applications. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL, VL.—S. (S.) Margolis

134. Vehicle Stability (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 102. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science Engineering majors. Introduction to the static and dynamic stability characteristics of transportation vehicles with examples drawn from aircraft, high-performance automobiles, rail cars and boats. Laboratory experiments illustrate the dynamic behavior of automobiles, race cars, bicycles, etc. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—S. (S.) Karnopp

139. Stability of Flexible Dynamic Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in Engineering 102 and 103. Stability of flexible systems. Introduction to fluid-structure interaction. Mechanical vibrations. Design of mechanical subsystems or systems under constraints. Dynamic instabilities. Flutter. Control effectiveness. Energy extraction from fluid-structure interactions. Design applications to aerospace, mechanical and biomedical systems. No credit for students who have completed Aerospace Science and Engineering 139. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (S.) Sarigul-Klijn

150A. Mechanical Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in: Engineering 45 or Engineering 45Y; C- or better in both Engineering 104 and course 50 (may be taken concurrently). Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering majors. Principles of engineering mechanics applied to mechanical design. Theories of static and fatigue failure of metals. Design projects emphasizing the progression from conceptualization to hardware. Experimental stress analysis and mechanical measurements using strain gages. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL, WE.—F, S, Su. (F, S, Su.) Hill, Moore, Ravani, Schaaf

150B. Mechanical Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in course 150A. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Principles of engineering mechanics applied to the design and selection of mechanical components. Design projects, which concentrate on conceptual design, engineering analysis, methods of manufacture, material selection, and cost. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—W, S. (W, S.) Farouki, Linke

151. Statistical Methods in Design and Manufacturing (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in course 150A. Restricted to Restrictions on Enrollment Text: Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Methods of statistical analysis with emphasis on applications in mechanical design and manufacturing. Applications include product evaluation and decision making, stress-strength interference, probabilistic design, systems reliability, and fatigue under random loading. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—W. (W.) C. Davis

152. Computer-Aided Mechanism Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 102; C- or better in course 5 or Engineering 6 or Computer Science Engineering 30. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Principles of computer-aided mechanism design. Computer-aided kinematic, static, and dynamic analysis and design of planar mechanisms such as multiple-loop linkages and geared linkages. Introduction to kinematic synthesis of mechanisms. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—(F.) Cheng

154. Mechatronics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in each of the following: Engineering 100 and Engineering 102 and course 50. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Mechatronics system concept and overview, control system design ware architecture, microcontroller and interface technology for mechatronics control, sensor for mechatronics systems, actuator drives. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—S. (S.) Yamazaki

161. Combustion and the Environment (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in course 106. Introduction to combustion kinetics; the theory of pre-mixed flames and diffusion flames; turbulent combustion; formation of air pollutants in combustion systems; examples of combustion devices which include internal combustion engines, gas turbines, furnaces and waste incinerators; alternative fuel sources. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—W. (W.) Shaw

163. Internal Combustion Engines and Future Alternatives (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in course 50 and course 106. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Fundamentals of internal combustion engine design and performance. Future needs to adapt to environmental concerns, and the feasibility of better alternatives in the future. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F. (F.) Erickson, Park

164. Introduction to Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in both course 106 and 165. Introduction to basic mechanisms and processes associated with heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), including equipment and systems used for HVAC in residential and commercial buildings. Only 2 units for students who have completed Civil and Environmental Engineering 125. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. Modera

165. Heat Transfer (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in course 5 or Engineering 6 or Computer Science Engineering 30; C- or better in Engineering 103 and 105. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer. Computational modeling of heat transfer in engineering. Applications to engineering equipment with the use of digital computers. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F, S, Su. (F, S, Su.) R. Davis, Narayanan, Shaw

171. Analysis, Simulation and Design of Mechatronic Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 100 and 102. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Modeling of dynamic engineering systems in various energy domains. Analysis and design of dynamic systems. Response of linear systems. Digital computer simulation and physical experiments. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F, W. (F, W.) Assadian, Horsley, Karnopp

172. Automatic Control of Engineering Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 100 and 102. Restricted to Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering/Materials Science and Engineering. Classical feedback control; block diagrams; control systems performance specifications; steady state errors; rise and settling times; root locus; PID controllers; control design with Bode and Nyquist plots; stability; phase and gain margin; lead and lag compensators; state variable feedback controllers. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Eke, Horsley, Joshi

185A. Mechanical Engineering Systems Design Project (4)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in: course 150A and course 165 (may be taken concurrently); Communications 1 or 3 recommended; upper division composition recommended. Restricted to Senior standing in Mechanical Engineering (EMEC). Major mechanical engineering design experience; the mechanical engineering design process and its use in the design of engineering systems incorporating appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: SciEng | OL, QL, SE, VL, WE.—W. (W.) C. Davis, Velinsky, Moore

185B. Mechanical Engineering Systems Design Project (4)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 185A and senior standing in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Major mechanical engineering design experience; the mechanical engineering design process and its use in the design of engineering systems incorporating appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: Sci | OL, QL, SE, VL, WE.—S. (S.) Velinsky, C. Davis, Moore, Robinson

189A. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Energy Systems and the Environment (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Energy Systems and the Environment. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189B. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Engineering Controls (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Engineering Controls. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189C. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Engineering Dynamics (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Engineering Dynamics. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189D. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Biomechanics (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Biomechanics. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189E. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Fluid Mechanics (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Fluid Mechanics. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189F. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Manufacturing Engineering (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Manufacturing Engineering. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189G. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering and Product Design (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Mechanical Engineering and Product Design. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189H. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Mechatronics Systems (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Mechatronics Systems. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189I. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; MEMS/Nanotechnology (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in MEMS/Nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189J. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Solid and Structural Mechanics (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Solid and Structural Mechanics. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189K. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Thermodynamics (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Thermodynamics. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

189L. Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering; Vehicle and Transportation Systems (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Directed group study in Vehicle and Transportation Systems. May be repeated for credit when the topic is different. Offered irregularly.

192. Internship in Engineering (1-5)

Internship. Prerequisite: upper division standing; approval of project prior to period of internship. Supervised work experience in mechanical engineering. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

197TC. Mentoring and Tutoring Engineering in the Community (1-4)

Prerequisite: upper division standing; consent of instructor. Mentoring, coaching, tutoring and/or supervision of students in K- 12 schools in Engineering-related topics. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

Courses in Aerospace Science and Engineering (EAE)

Lower Division

1. Introduction to Aerospace Science Engineering (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Description of the field of aerospace engineering with examples from industry, government, and research. Aerospace engineering principles, ethics, and responsibilities. (P/NP grading only.)—F. (F.)

10. From the Wright Brothers to Drones and Quadcopters (2)

Lecture—2 hours. History of aircraft and its influence on society. Topics covered will include Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, safety considerations, economics and privacy issues. Aerodynamics, stability and control will also be introduced. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SciEng or SocSci | SE or SS.—Su. (Su.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and lower division standing. (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

126. Theoretical and Computational Aerodynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in course 127; C- or better in Engineering 180 or Applied Science Engineering 115 or Mechanical Engineering 115 or Mathematics 128C. Development of general equations of fluid motion. Study of flow field kinematics and dynamics. Flow about a body. Thin airfoil theory. Viscous effects. Applications of numerical methods to wing analysis and design. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. Hafez

127. Applied Aircraft Aerodynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in Mechanical Engineering 106. Experimental characteristics of wing sections. High-lift devices. Lift and drag at high Mach numbers. Drag aerodynamics. Total aircraft drag estimation. Aerodynamic design procedures. GE credit: QL, SE, SL, WE.—F. (F.) Robinson

129. Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in Engineering 102. Restricted to upper division standing. Aircraft and spacecraft stability and control. Derivation of fundamental equations of motion for aircraft/spacecraft. Specialization of equations for aircraft. Fundamentals of feedback. Aircraft flight control systems. Specialization of equations of motion for orbiting spacecraft. Spacecraft attitude control systems. GE credit: QL, SE.—W. (W.) Hess, Kong

130A. Aircraft Performance and Design (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in course 127; C- or better in course 129 (may be taken concurrently). Major aircraft design experience with multiple realistic constraints including aerodynamics, performance analysis, weight estimation, stability and control, and appropriate engineering standards. GE credit: SciEng | SE, QL, VL.—W. (W.) van Dam

130B. Aircraft Performance and Design (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in course 130A. Restricted to upper division standing. Major aircraft design experience incorporating multiple realistic constraints including: refinement and iteration of initial design; cost analysis, detailed design, and analysis of aircraft structure; propulsion system; aerodynamics, stability, and control/handling qualities; manufacturing; or appropriate engineering standards. GE credit: OL, SE, SL, VL, WE.—S. (S.) van Dam

133. Finite Element Methods in Structures (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisites: grade of C- or better in Engineering 104. Open to College of Engineering Students. Introduction to the aerospace structural design process. History of aircraft and spacecraft materials. Effects of loading beyond elastic limit. Deflections and stresses due to combined loading. Virtual work principles, and finite element methods. Applications to aerospace structures. GE credit: SE.—F. (F.) Sarigul-Klijn

135. Aerospace Structures (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Engineering 104; course 126 or 127 recommended. Analysis and design methods used in aerospace structures. Shear flow in open, closed and multicell beam cross-sections, buckling of flat and curved sheets, tension field beams, local buckling. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—W. (W.) La Saponara

137. Structural Composites (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in Engineering 104. Overview of materials and technology for creating structures from fiber reinforced resin matrix composite material systems. Elementary design analysis and case studies emphasizing aeronautical applications. GE credit: SE.—La Saponara

138. Aircraft Propulsion (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: C- or better in Mechanical Engineering 106. Analysis and design of modern aircraft gas turbine engines. Development and application of cycle performance prediction techniques for important engine configurations. Introduction to the operation and design of inlets, compressors, burners, turbines, and nozzles. Cycle design studies for specific applications. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—W. (W.) R. Davis

140. Rocket Propulsion (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Mechanical Engineering 106. Restricted to upper division standing. Fluid and thermodynamics of rocket engines, liquid and solid rocket propulsion. Space propulsion concepts and space mission requirements. Not open for credit to students who have taken identical course 189A prior to Fall Quarter 2013. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (W.) R. Davis, Delplanque

141. Space Systems Design (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in Engineering 102 and Mechanical Engineering 106. Introduction to space systems design including space project organization, requirements definition and specification, concepts formulation, system tradeoffs, subsystem design. Prototype space mission concepts are presented and a multidisciplinary mission design is developed that considers all relevant architecture elements. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F. (F.) Joshi

142. Orbital Mechanics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: grade of C- or better in Engineering 102. Restricted to upper division standing. Satellite orbits, multistage rockets, current global boosters, and new technologies. Design application problems include satellites, trajectory optimizations, and interplanetary trajectories. Not open for credit to student who have completed course 189B prior to Fall Quarter 2013. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W, Su. (Su.) 

189C. Flight Simulation and Testing in Design of Aircraft and Spacecraft (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102; consent of the instructor. Teaches flight test techniques together with data analysis methods to prepare students for any type of flight testing including fixed wing, rotary wing and launch vehicles. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—Sarigul-Klijn

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

Courses in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering (MAE)

(Formerly courses in Aeronautical Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering.)

Graduate

207. Engineering Experimentation and Uncertainty Analysis (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 107A and 107B. Design and analysis of engineering experiments with emphasis on measurement standards, data analysis, regressions and general and detailed uncertainty analysis, including statistical treatment of experimental data intervals, propagation of bias and precision errors, correlated bias approximations, and using jitter programs.—F. (S.) C. Davis

208. Measurement Methods in Fluid Mechanics and Combustion (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 165 and Engineering 103. Application of shadow, schlieren and other flow visualization methods. Introduction to optics and lasers. Measurement of velocity and concentrations in reacting and non-reacting flows with laser diagnostic techniques including LDV, Rayleigh, Raman and fluorescence scattering and CARS. Offered irregularly.

210A. Advanced Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103, 105 and Mechanical Engineering 165. Development of differential equations governing continuity, momentum and energy transfer. Solutions in laminar flow for exact cases, low and high Reynolds numbers and lubrication theory. Dynamics of inviscid flow.—F. (F.) Aldredge, Shaw

210B. Advanced Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 210A. Study of stability and transition to turbulence. Introduction to the physics of turbulence. Modeling of turbulence for numerical determination of momentum and heat transfer.—W. (W.) Hwang

211. Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103, 105 and Mechanical Engineering 165 or the equivalent. Design aspects of selected topics; heat conduction, fins; heat transport in ducts, boundary layers and separated flows; heat exchangers.—W. Erickson, Park, Narayanan

212. Biomedical Heat and Mass Transport Processes (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 165, Biological Systems Engineering 125, Chemical Engineering 153 or the equivalent. Application of principles of heat and mass transfer to biomedical systems related to heat exchange between the biomedical system and its environment, mass transfer across cell membranes and the design and analysis of artificial human organs. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 212.) Offered irregularly.—Aldredge

213. Advanced Turbulence Modeling (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 210B. Methods of analyzing turbulence; kinematics and dynamics of homogeneous turbulence; Reynolds stress and heat-flux equations; second order closures and their simplification; numerical methods; application to boundary layer-type flows; two-dimensional and three-dimensional hydraulic and environmental flows. Offered irregularly.—Aldredge

215. Biomedical Fluid Mechanics and Transport Phenomena (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 or Chemical Engineering 150B or Civil and Environmental Engineering 141. Application of fluid mechanics and transport to biomedical systems. Flow in normal physiological function and pathological conditions. Topics include circulatory and respiratory flows, effect of flow on cellular processes, transport in the arterial wall and in tumors, and tissue engineering. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 215.) Offered irregularly.

216. Advanced Thermodynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 105. Study of topics important to energy conversion systems, propulsion and other systems using high temperature gases. Classical thermodynamics and quantum statistical mechanics of nonreacting and chemically reacting gases, gas mixtures, and other substances. Offered in alternate years.—W. Shaw

217. Combustion (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 and 105, Mechanical Engineering 106. Restricted to graduate students. Review of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Discussion of reacting flows, their governing equations and transport phenomena; detonations; laminar flame structure and turbulent combustion. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Shaw

218. Advanced Energy Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 and 105, or the equivalent. Review of options available for advanced power generation. Detailed study of basic power balances, component efficiencies, and overall powerplant performance for one advanced concept such as a fusion, magnetohydrodynamic, or solar electric powerplant.—(F.) Erickson

219. Introduction to Scientific Computing in Solid and Fluid Dynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 and 104. Scientific calculations with finite element and finite difference methods for multi-dimensional problems in solid and fluid dynamics are performed with examples in C, C++, FORTRAN, and MATLAB script files. Derivation of the basic equations of motion in finite volume form with applications to elasticity, waves.—F. (F.) Delplanque

220. Mechanical Vibrations (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 122. Multiple degrees of freedom; damping measures; Rayleigh's method; vibration absorbers; eigenvalues and modeshapes; modal coordinates; forced vibrations; random processes and vibrations; autocorrelation; spectral density; first passage and fatigue failure; nonlinear systems; phase plane. Offered in alternate years.—Eke

222. Advanced Dynamics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102. Dynamics of particles, rigid bodies and distributed systems with engineering applications; generalized coordinates; Hamilton's principle; Lagrange's equations; Hamilton-Jacobi theory; modal dynamics orthogonality; wave dynamics; dispersion.—F. (F.) Karnopp

223. Multibody Dynamics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102. Coupled rigid-body kinematics/dynamics; reference frames; vector differentiation; configuration and motion constraints; holonomicity; generalized speeds; partial velocities; mass; inertia tensor/theorems; angular momentum; generalized forces; comparing Newton/Euler, Lagrange's, Kane's methods; computer-aided equation derivation; orientation; Euler; Rodrigues parameters. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 223.)—W, S. (W.) Eke, Ravani

225. Spatial Kinematics and Robotics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: C Language and course 222. Spatial kinematics, screw theory, spatial mechanisms analysis and synthesis, robot kinematics and dynamics, robot workspace, path planning, robot programming, real-time architecture and software implementation. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 225.) Offered irregularly.—Ravani

226. Acoustics and Noise Control (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 122. Description of sound using normal modes and waves; interaction between vibrating solids and sound fields; sound absorption in enclosed spaces; sound transmission through barriers; applications in design, acoustic enclosures and sound walls, room acoustics, design of quiet machinery.—Sarigul-Klijn

227. Research Techniques in Biomechanics (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—4 hours; term paper or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mathematics 22B and consent of instructor; Exercise Science 115 recommended. Experimental techniques for biomechanical analysis of human movement. Techniques evaluated include data acquisition and analysis by computer, force platform analysis, strength assessment, planar and three-dimensional videography, data reduction and smoothing, body segment parameter determination, electromyography, and biomechanical modeling. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 227/Exercise Science 227.) Offered irregularly.

228. Introduction to BioMEMS (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: BS engineering discipline or consent of instructor. Ideal for beginning graduate or advanced undergraduate students interested in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) topics related to biological applications. Covers topics from various disciplines related to BioMEMS: mechanical, electrical, biomedical, chemical engineering, and materials science. Offered in alternate years.—F. C. Davis

229. Design & Analysis of Micro-Electromechanical Systems (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; Engineering 45, 100, 104; Engineering 122 recommended. Mechanical design of micro-electronmechanical systems (MEMS). Device modeling: lumped parameter models; energy methods; nonlinearities; electrical and mechanical noise sources. Actuation and measurement methods: capacitive, piezoresistive, thermal, piezoelectric, and optical techniques. Review of basic electronics: bridge circuits, amplitude modulation; lock-in detection. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Horsley

231. Musculo-Skeletal System Biomechanics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 102. Mechanics of skeletal muscle and mechanical models of muscle, solution of the inverse dynamics problem, theoretical and experimental methods of kinematic and kinetic analysis, computation of intersegmental load and muscle forces, applications to gait analysis and sports biomechanics. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 231.) Offered irregularly.

232. Skeletal Tissue Mechanics (3)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 104B. Overview of the mechanical properties of the various tissues in the musculoskeletal system, the relationship of these properties to anatomic and histologic structure, and the changes in these properties caused by aging and disease. The tissues covered include bone, cartilage and synovial fluid, ligament and tendon. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 232.)—S. (S.) Fyhrie

234. Design and Dynamics of Road Vehicles (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 134. Analysis and numerical simulation of road vehicles with on design applications.—W. (W.) Velinsky

236. Aerodynamics in Nature and Technology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 103. Introduction to aerodynamics in nature, fundamentals of turbulence in atmospheric flows, planetary boundary layers, pedestrian-level winds in urban areas. Criteria for laboratory modeling of atmospheric flows, wind-tunnel testing. Offered irregularly.

237. Analysis and Design of Composite Structures (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 104 or equivalent. Modeling and analysis methodology for composite structures including response and failure. Laminated plate bending theory. Introduction to failure processes. Includes discussion of aerospace structural analysis.—S. (F.) La Saponara

238. Advanced Aerodynamic Design and Optimization (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Application of aerodynamic theory to obtain optimum aerodynamic shapes. Both analytic solutions and solutions obtained with numerical optimization techniques will be examined. Includes introduction to the calculus of variations and numerical optimization techniques. Offered irregularly.—van Dam

239. Advanced Finite Elements and Optimization (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 180 or Applied Science 115 or Mathematics 128C. Introduction to advanced finite elements and design optimization methods, with application to modeling of complex mechanical, aerospace and biomedical systems. Application of states of the art in finite elements in optimum design of components under realistic loading conditions and constraints. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 239.) Offered in alternate years.—W. Sarigul-Klijn

240. Computational Methods in Nonlinear Mechanics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Applied Science Engineering 115 or Mathematics 128B or Engineering 180. Deformation of solids and the motion of fluids treated with state-of-the-art computational methods. Numerical treatment of nonlinear dynamics; classification of coupled problems; applications of finite element methods to mechanical, aeronautical, and biological systems. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 240.) Offered irregularly.—Sarigul-Klijn

242. Stability of Thin-Walled Structures (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 104 or equivalent. Static stability of thin-walled aerospace structures treated from both theoretical and practical design perspectives. Both monolithic and composite construction considered. Buckling of stiffened panels, shells, and thin-walled beams, experimental methods and failure/crippling processes. Offered irregularly.—La Saponara

248. Advanced Turbomachinery (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 and 105. Preliminary aerodynamic design of axial and radial flow compressors and turbines. Design of diffusers. Selection of turbomachine and configurations and approximations to optimum dimensions and flow angles. Introduction to through flow analysis. Rotating stall and surge, and aeromechanical considerations. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) R. Davis

250A. Advanced Methods in Mechanical Design (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 150A and 150B or the equivalents, or consent of instructor. Applications of advanced techniques of solid mechanics to mechanical design problems. Coverage of advanced topics in stress analysis and static failure theories with emphasis in design of machine elements. Design projects emphasizing advanced analysis tools for life cycle evaluation.—F. (F.) Ravani, Velinsky

250B. Advanced Methods in Mechanical Design (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 250A. Applications of advanced techniques of solid mechanics to mechanical design problems. Advanced topics in variational methods of mechanics with emphasis in design of machine elements. Design projects emphasizing advanced analysis tools.—W. Hill

250C. Mechanical Performance of Materials (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in stress analysis and mechanical behavior of materials. Occurrence, mechanisms, and prediction of fatigue and fracture phenomenon. Use of stress and strain to predict crack initiation. Use of fracture mechanics to predict failure and crack propagation. Effects of stress concentration, manufacturing, load sequence, irregular loading, and multi-axial loading.—Hill

251. Mechatronics System Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 154 and 172 or Electrical and Computer Engineering 157A, 157B. Motion mechanism design, electric actuator, power electronics motion control, sensor technologies, personal computer-based control systems design, motion control general operating system and real time operating systems, motion control software design, discrete event control software design. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Yamazaki

252. Information Processing for Autonomous Robotics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 6, Mechanical Engineering 5, or equivalent programming experience, Mechanical Engineering 154, 171, or consent of instructor. Computational principles for sensing, reasoning, and navigation for autonomous robots. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Joshi

253. Network Theory and Applications (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 22A; Mathematics 22B; Statistics 13 or 120; experience with computer software; or consent of instructor. Develops the mathematical theory underlying growth, structure and function of networks with applications to physical, social, biological and engineered systems. Topics include network growth, resilience, epidemiology, phase transitions, software and algorithms, routing and search control, cascading failures. (Same course as Computer Science Engineering 253.) Offered in alternate years.—F. D'Souza

254. Engineering Software Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 5, Engineering 180. Principle and design of engineering software. Advanced topics in engineering software design, applications of object-oriented programming, very high-level languages, real-time multi-thread computing and sensor fusion, Web-based network computing, graphics, and GUI in engineering. Offered in alternate years.—F. Cheng

255. Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: proficiency in a high level programming language such as Fortran, Pascal, or C. Representation and processing of geometrical information in design and manufacturing. Numeric and symbolic computations. Coordinate systems and transformations. Bezier and B-spline curves and surfaces. Interpolation and approximation methods. Intersections, offsets, and blends. Path planning for machining, inspection, and robotics applications. Offered in alternate years.—S. Farouki

258. Hybrid Electric Vehicle System Theory and Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 150B, graduate standing in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering. Advanced vehicle design for fuel economy, performance, and low emissions, considering regulations, societal demands and manufacturability. Analysis and verification of computer design and control of vehicle systems in real vehicle tests. Advanced engine concepts. Offered irregularly.

261. Gas Dynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 or the equivalent. Flow of compressible fluids. Isentropic flow. Flow with friction, heat transfer, chemically reacting gas and particle mixtures. Normal and oblique shock waves, combustion, blast and expansion waves. Method of characteristics. Offered irregularly.

262. Advanced Aerodynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Aeronautical Engineering 126. Study of invicid and viscous flows about aerodynamic shapes at subsonic, transonic and supersonic conditions. Application of aerodynamic theory to design for reduced drag and increased lift. Offered irregularly.—Hafez

263. Introduction to Computational Aerodynamics and Fluid Dynamics (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 103 or consent of instructor. Introduction to numerical methods for solution of fluid flow problems. Discretization techniques and solution algorithms. Finite difference solutions to classical model equations pertinent to wave phenomena, diffusion phenomena, or equilibrium. Application to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. Offered irregularly.

264. Computational Aerodynamics (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Aeronautical Science and Engineering 126, Engineering 180, or consent of instructor. Numerical methods for aerodynamics flow simulation in the transonic regime. Solutions of steady and unsteady potential and compressible boundary layer equations. Numerical schemes for mixed type equations and shock waves/numerical grid generation. Viscous/inviscid interaction and coupling procedures. Offered irregularly.—Hafez

266. Advanced Wind-Tunnel Testing (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in fluid dynamics. Aspects of low-speed wind-tunnel testing for solving aeronautical and non-aeronautical problems including tunnel corrections, scale effects, force and moment measurements, and flow visualization. Offered irregularly.—van Dam

267. Parallel Computations in Fluid/Thermal Sciences (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 106, 165, Engineering 180 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. Programming languages and constructs for engineering analysis on parallel computers including MPI (distributed), OpenMP (shared), and Fortran95. Graduate or junior/senior undergraduate as a technical elective. Offered in alternate years.—(F.) R. Davis

268. Wind Power Engineering (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Engineering 102 and 103, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals for understanding the conversion of wind power to mechanical power and electricity. Related engineering, economic and societal issues. Offered in alternate years.—F. (F.) van Dam

269. Fuel Cell Systems (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 106, 107, 165, or equivalent, or consent of instructor; graduate or junior/senior undergraduate as a technical elective. Limited enrollment. Basics of electrochemistry and fuel cell engines in mobile and stationary applications. Aspects of fuel cell energy converters and their subsystems including practice with existing fuel cell and hydrogen systems on campus. Offered in alternate years.—S. Erickson

271. Advanced Modeling and Simulation of Mechatronic Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 172 or the equivalent. Multiport models of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and thermal devices; bond graphs, block diagrams and state space equations; modeling of multiple energy domain systems; three-dimensional mechanics; digital simulation laboratory.—F. (F.) 

272. Theory and Design of Control Systems (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 172 or the equivalent. Mathematical representations of linear dynamical systems. Feedback principles; benefits and cost of feedback. Analysis and design of control systems based on classical and modern approaches, with emphasis on applications to mechanical and aeronautical systems.—Assadian

274. Analysis and Design of Digital Control Systems (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 172. Discrete systems analysis; digital filtering; sample data systems; state space and transform design techniques; quantization effects; multi-input, multi-output systems. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Hess

275. Advance Aircraft Stability and Control (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Development and analysis of aircraft equations of motion. Flexible modes. Response to control actuation. Random inputs and disturbances. Stability and control augmentation system design. Handling qualities. Offered in alternate years.—S. Hess, Kong

276. Data Acquisition and Analysis (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Application of computers for data acquisition and control. Topics include computer architecture, characteristics of transducers, hardware for laboratory applications of computers, fundamentals of interfaces between computers and experimental equipment, programming techniques for data acquisition and control, basic data analysis. Offered in alternate years.

290C. Graduate Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Individual and/or group conference on problems, progress, and techniques in mechanical and aeronautical engineering research. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

297. Seminar (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Current topics in engineering including developments in mechanical and aeronautical engineering with presentations by students, faculty, and visitors. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

298. Group Study (1-5)

299. Research (1-12)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)

Professional

390. The Teaching of Aeronautical Science and Engineering (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: meet qualifications for teaching assistant and/or associate-in in Aeronautical Science and Engineering. Methods of leading discussion groups or laboratory sections, writing and grading quizzes, use of laboratory equipment, and grading laboratory reports. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM