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202. Quantitative Epidemiology I: Probability (5)

Lecture—4 hours; laboratory—2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16A/B or 17A/B or 21A/B or equivalent; Statistics 102 and 108 or Population Health and Reproduction 402 and 403 or equivalent; concurrent or previous enrollment in a basic epidemiology course (e.g., course 205). Foundations in probability for epidemiologists. Emphasis on properties of and relationships between distributions and application of probability concepts to epidemiology. Includes a mathematical skills laboratory to assist in solution of epidemiologic problems.

203. Quantitative Epidemiology II: Statistical Inference (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 202, or Statistics 130A, or 131A, or 133; basic course in Epidemiology (205 or equivalent). Provides the mathematical statistics foundation for statistical models, methods, and data analysis.

204. Quantitative Epidemiology III: Statistical Models (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 203, or Statistics 130B, or 131B, or 133; Statistics 108 recommended; basic course in Epidemiology (205 or equivalent); consent of instructor. Introduces statistical models, methods, and data analysis in the areas of generalized linear model and survival analysis methodology.

204A. Foundation of Statistical Models, Methods, and Data Analysis for Scientists (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Statistics 130A, or Statistics 131A, or Statistics 133, course 228 recommended. Provides the mathematical statistics foundation for statistical models, methods, and data analysis.—W. (W.) Bang

204B. Statistical Models, Methods, and Data Analysis for Scientists (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 204A; Statistics 108 recommended. Introduces statistical models, methods, and data analysis in the areas of generalized linear, survival, and correlated data methodology.—S. (S.) Li

205. Principles of Epidemiology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 202, an introductory statistics course, or consent of the instructor. Basic epidemiologic concepts and approaches to epidemiologic research, with examples from veterinary and human medicine, including outbreak investigation, infectious disease epidemiology, properties of tests, and an introduction to epidemiologic study design and surveillance. (Same course as Preventive Veterinary Medicine 205.)—F. (F.) 

205A. Principles of Epidemiology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 402 or consent of instructor. Basic epidemiologic concepts and approaches to epidemiologic research, with examples from veterinary and human medicine, including outbreak investigation, infectious disease epidemiology, properties of tests, and an introduction to epidemiologic study design and surveillance. (Same course as Preventive Veterinary Medicine 405.)

205B. Integration of Epidemiologic Concepts (2)

Discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 405/course 205A can be taken concurrently. In-depth analysis and integration of basic epidemiologic concepts and approaches to epidemiologic research presented in Preventive Veterinary Medicine 405/course 205A, with more mathematical and theoretical basis and examples from veterinary and human medicine, including outbreak investigation, infectious disease epidemiology, properties of diagnostic tests, study design, and surveillance.—F. (F.) 

206. Epidemiologic Study Design (4)

Lecture—30 sessions; discussion—9 sessions; laboratory—2 sessions. Prerequisite: course 205 or consent of instructor. Builds on concepts presented in course 205. Concepts of epidemiologic study design--clinical trials, observational cohort studies, case control studies--introduced in course 205A are covered in more depth, using a problem-based format. Discussion of published epidemiologic studies. (Same course as Preventive Veterinary Medicine 206.)

207. Advanced Epidemiologic Methodology (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 206. In-depth integration of advanced epidemiological concepts. Theory, methods, and applications for observational studies including random and systematic error, confounding, counterfactuals, causal inference, effect modification, internal and external validity, estimability, and interpretation of effect measures, and advanced study designs. (Same course as Public Health Sciences 207.)—S. (S.) Hertz-Picciotto, Kass

208. Analysis and Interpretation of Epidemiologic Data (3)

Lecture—16 sessions; laboratory—21 sessions; project. Prerequisite: course 204 (may be taken concurrently) and 207, and either Statistics 144 or Population Health and Reproduction 202 and entry level skill in standard statistical software (e.g., SPSS, BMDP, SAS, Stata, MinTab, S-Plus). Application of theory and concepts of statistics and epidemiology to analysis and interpretation of data typically found in veterinary and human epidemiologic research.—F. (F.) Beckett

209. History of Epidemiology in Public Health (2)

Lecture—0.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Introduction to the history of epidemiology in solving major public health problems. Original historical articles will be read/discussed. Topics may include: infectious disease, accidents/adverse events, nutritional deficiencies, community vaccination trials, occupational exposures, cancer, birth defects, cardiovascular disease, and smoking. (Same course as Public Health Sciences 209.)—W. (W.) Hertz-Picciotto

220. Problems in Epidemiologic Study Design (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 405 and 406 or the equivalent; Population Health and Reproduction 207 concurrently; Statistics 102 and 106 or the equivalent. Design and development of research protocols and funding applications for peer review. Application of research methods data collection and management and statistical analysis in research proposals. Methods of evaluating research proposals, mechanisms of funding, specifying human subjects considerations.—S. (S.) 

222. Epidemiological Modeling (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 405. Techniques of model building and simulation of infectious diseases will be explored. Epidemiologic modeling philosophy, construction and validation will be emphasized. Offered in alternate years.—W. 

223. Spatial Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 205A or Preventive Veterinary Medicine 205. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatial statistics. Students are expected to complete a term project based on their graduate research. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) 

224. Health and Ecological Risk Analysis (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 406 or consent of instructor; background in statistics, including multivariable techniques; a course in differential equations. A methodological approach to risk analysis for human and animal-related health and ecological issues. Basic principles of risk analysis, including perception, communication, assessment and management. Emphasis on the assessment of risk.—S. (S.) 

225. Advanced Topics in Epidemiology Methods (2)

Discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 205B, 206, and 207 (or equivalents, with consent of instructor). An in-depth study of topics in epidemiology theory and methods, selected from: causal inference, confounding, study design, or other related areas, with year to year variation. Readings are assigned and students are expected to lead discussions on them. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly.—S. Hertz-Picciotto

226. Methods for Longitudinal and Repeated Measurement Data (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 204 or consent of instructor. Mixed models for longitudinal data (LD)/repeated measurements; Mean and covariance models; General linear LD models; Random coefficients models; Linear mixed effects models for continuous outcome; Generalized linear mixed effects model for discrete outcome including binary, ordinal and count data.—F. (F.) Nguyen

229. Geographic Information Systems for Health Professionals (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Emphasis on basic geographic and data management principles. Focus on software proficiency in application to analyzing/solving health-related problems. For graduate and professional students in epidemiology, public health, preventive veterinary medicine, health informatics with interest in spatial techniques in research.—S. (S.) 

230. Introduction to Molecular Epidemiology (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 205. Overview of the modern field of molecular epidemiology. Integrates molecular biology into traditional epidemiologic research by identifying pathways, molecules and genes that influence the risk of developing disease.—S. Schmidt

231. Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: introductory epidemiology course (e.g., course 205). Infectious disease epidemiology and prevention, with emphasis on human and veterinary diseases of global health importance. Major global health epidemics and challenges of infectious diseases, by mode of transmission. (Same course as Public Health Sciences 211.)—W. (W.) DeRiemer

240. Principles of Injury Epidemiology (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Overview of the epidemiology of human injury, including general principles, surveillance methods, behavioral factors, environmental factors, treatment issues and engineering and legal interventions related to vehicular injuries, drownings, falls, fires and burns, poisonings, firearm injuries, and other intentional injuries.—W. (W.) Romano

251. Environmental Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 405 (may be taken concurrently); upper division undergraduates who have completed Environmental Studies 126; or the equivalent. Examination of the human health effects and the risk of disease from community, occupational, and personal exposure to toxic substances. Offered in alternate years.—F. Schenker

252. Social Epidemiology (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 205A; consent of instructor. Social determinants of health; psychosocial and physiological pathways; health and social inequality; gender and racial/ethnic disparities in health; social support, social cohesion and health; social gradient in behavioral risk factors; social ecological approaches to health intervention; interventions addressing social determinants. (Same Course as Public Health Sciences 252.)—S. (S.) 

260. Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases and Aging (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Overview of the epidemiology of chronic disease in old age. Topics include biology of aging, epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, neoplasms, osteoporosis and fractures, psychosocial factors and health in old age, dementias, functional status and prevention of disease.—W. (W.)

270. Research Methods in Occupational Epidemiology (3)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 205A or Preventive Veterinary Medicine 205; Statistics 102 or Preventive Veterinary Medicine 202. Methods used in epidemiologic research on occupational hazards. Topics include design and analysis of cohort and case-control studies, sample size, measuring dose, choosing a control group, validation of employment and health data, interpreting negative studies, and analysis software. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Beaumont

272. Cancer Epidemiology (2)

Recitation—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: must have basic understanding of epidemiologic and statistical concepts that are covered in courses 205A, 205B, 206 (may be taken concurrently), and Statistics 102. We will cover the underlying concepts essential to understanding cancer epidemiology, such as trends in incidence and survival, epidemiologic methods used to assess cancer etiology, prevention and control, and an introduction to the cancerinitiation and progression multi-stage model.—W. (W.) Cress

290. Seminars in Epidemiology (0.5)

Seminar—0.5 hours. Faculty and students will present and lead discussion of ongoing or published epidemiologic research. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

291. Seminars in Human Health Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Critical review, evaluation, and discussion of research in health services and clinical epidemiology. Presentation of statistical, epidemiologic, and econometric methods. Students present their own research and critique the work of others. May be repeated for credit. (Same course as General Medicine 291.) (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

298. Group Study (1-5)

Seminar—1-5 hours. Group study in selected areas of epidemiology.

299. Research (1-12)

Research in selected areas of epidemiology. (S/U grading only.)

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Updated: February 23, 2017 2:30 PM