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Courses in Geology (GEL)

Lower Division

1. The Earth (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to the study of the Earth. Earth's physical and chemical structure; internal and surface processes that mold the Earth; geological hazards and resources. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 50. Only 2 units of credit to students who have completed course 2. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Mukhopadhyay, Osleger

2. The Blue Planet: Introduction to Earth Science (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Study of the solid and fluid earth and its place in the solar system. Holistic examination of how the solid earth interacts with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and extraterrestrial environment. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 50. Only 2 units of credit to students who have completed course 1. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—W. (W.) Montańez

2G. The Blue Planet: Introduction to Earth Science Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 2 concurrently. Small group discussion and preparation of short papers for course 2. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE.—W. (W.) Montańez

3. History of Life (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 recommended. The history of life during the three and one-half billion years from its origin to the present day. Origin of life and processes of evolution; how to visualize and understand living organisms from their fossil remains. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Motani

3G. History of Life: Discussion (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 3 concurrently. Small group discussion and preparation of short papers for course 3. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—W. (W.) Motani

3L. History of Life Laboratory (1)

Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 3 concurrently. Exercises in understanding fossils as the clues to interpreting ancient life, including their functional morphology, paleoecology, and evolution. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Motani

4. Evolution: Science and World View (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to biological evolution. Emphasis on historical development, major lines of evidence and causes of evolution; relationships between evolution and Earth history; the impact of evolutionary thought on other disciplines. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, WE.—S. (S.) Vermeij

10. Modern and Ancient Global Environmental Change (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Fundamental scientific concepts underlying issues such as global warming, pollution, and the future of nonsustainable resources presented in the context of anthropogenic processes as well as natural forcing of paleoenvironmental change throughout Earth's history. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, VL.—F. (F.) Montańez

12. Evolution and Paleobiology of Dinosaurs (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Introduction to evolutionary biology, paleobiology, ecology and paleoecology, using dinosaurs as case studies. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W. (F, W.) Carlson

16. The Oceans (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Introductory survey of the marine environment. Oceanic physical phenomena, chemical constituents and chemistry of water, geological history, the seas biota and human utilization of marine resources. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 116. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—W, S. (W, S.) Hill, Spero

16G. The Oceans: Discussion (2)

Discussion/laboratory—2 hours; term paper or discussion. Prerequisite: course 16 concurrently. Scientific method applied to discovery of the processes, biota and history of the oceans. Group discussion and preparation of term paper. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 116G. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—W. (W.) Hill

17. Earthquakes and Other Earth Hazards (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Impact of earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, landslides, and floods on humans, structures, and the environment. Discussion of the causes and effects of disasters and catastrophes, and on prediction, preparation, and mitigation of natural hazards. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Billen, Kellogg

18. Energy and the Environment (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Conventional and alternative energy resources and their environmental impacts. Basic principles, historical development, current advantages and disadvantages, future prospects. Oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, wind, geothermal, water, tidal, solar, hydrogen, and other sources of energy for the 21st century. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, WE.—W. (W.) Verosub

18V. Energy and the Environment (3)

Web virtual lecture—1.5 hours; web electronic discussion—1.5 hours. Conventional and alternative energy resources and their environmental impacts. Basic principles, historical development, current advantages and disadvantages, future prospects. Oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, wind, geothermal, water, tidal, solar, hydrogen, and other sources of energy for the 21st century. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, WE.—W. (W.) Verosub

20. Geology of California (2)

Lecture—2 hours. The geologic history of California, the origin of rocks and the environments in which they were formed, the structure of the rocks and the interpretation of their structural history, mineral resources, and appreciation of the California landscape. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, VL.—W. Cowgill

25. Geology of National Parks (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Appreciation of the geologic framework underlying the inherent beauty of U.S. National Parks. Relationship of individual parks to geologic processes such as mountain building, volcanism, stream erosion, glacial action and landscape evolution. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL, VL.—F. (F.) Osleger

25V. Geology of National Parks (3)

Web virtual lecture—1 hour; web electronic discussion—2 hours. Appreciation of the geologic framework underlying the inherent beauty of U.S. National Parks. Relationship of individual parks to geologic processes such as mountain building, volcanism, stream erosion, glacial action and landscape evolution. No credit for students who have completed course 25. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (S.) Gee (UC San Diego), Osleger (UC Davis), Schwarz (UC Santa Cruz)

28. Astrobiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Origin, evolution and distribution of life in our solar system and the Universe. Detecting habitable worlds, Drake equations, necessities and raw materials for life, philosophical implications of the search for life elsewhere. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—F. (F.) Yin

30. Fractals, Chaos and Complexity (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16A or 21A. Modern ideas about the unifying ideas of fractal geometry, chaos and complexity. Basic theory and applications with examples from physics, earth sciences, mathematics, population dynamics, ecology, history, economics, biology, computer science, art and architecture. (Same course as Physics 30.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—(W.) Rundle

32. Volcanoes (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Role of eruptions, and eruptive products of volcanoes in shaping the planet's surface, influencing its environment, and providing essential human resources. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (S.) Cooper

35. Rivers (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Introduction to geomorphology, climate and geology of rivers and watersheds, with case examples from California. Assessment of impacts of logging, agriculture, mining, urbanization and water supply on river processes. Optional river field trips. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.

36. The Solar System (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Nature of the sun, moon, and planets as determined by recent manned and unmanned exploration of the solar system. Comparison of terrestrial, lunar, and planetary geological processes. Search for life on other planets. Origin and evolution of the solar system. (Former course 113-113G.) GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, VL, WE.—S. (S.) Osleger, Stewart

50. Physical Geology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: high school physics and chemistry. The Earth, its materials, its internal and external processes, its development through time by sea-floor spreading and global plate tectonics. Students with credit for course 1 or the equivalent may receive only 2 units for course 50. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—F. W. (F, W.) Billen, Cooper, Lesher, Zierenberg

50L. Physical Geology Laboratory (2)

Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 50 concurrently. Introduction to classification and recognition of minerals and rocks and to interpretation of topographic and geologic maps and aerial photographs. Students with credit for course 1L or the equivalent may receive only 1 unit for course 50L. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W. (F, W.) Billen, Cooper, Lesher, Zierenberg

60. Earth Materials: Introduction (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2A; Mathematics 16A or 17A or 21A; course 1 or 50; course 50L. Physical and chemical properties of rocks, minerals and other earth materials; structure and composition of rock-forming minerals; formation of minerals by precipitation from silicate liquids and aqueous fluids and by solid state transformations. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F. (F.) 

62. Optical Mineralogy (2)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 60 (can be concurrent). Optical properties of inorganic crystals; techniques of mineral identification using the polarizing microscope; strategies for studying rocks in thin section. GE credit: SciEng | SE, VL.—F. (F.) 

81. Learning in Science and Mathematics (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours; field work—2 hours. Limited to 26 students per section. Exploration of how students learn and develop understanding in science and mathematics classrooms. Introduction to case studies and interview techniques and their use in K-6 classrooms to illuminate factors that affect student learning. (Same course as Education 81.) (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SS, VL, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Latimer, Stevenson

91. Geology of Campus Waterways (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour; fieldwork—1 hour. Research characterizing geological processes in waterways on campus including links among hydrologic, atmospheric, physical, and human processes; carbon cycling and interpreting processes from sediments; field research techniques; research project design and implementation; implications of results for society and environmental policy. May be repeated for credit three times. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE, SL.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

92. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; lower division standing. Work-learn experience on and off campus in all subject areas offered by the department. Internships supervised by a member of the faculty. May be repeated for credit up to 12 units. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit up to three times. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor; lower division standing. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Upper Division

101. Structural Geology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 50 and 50L; Physics 7A or 9A; Mathematics 16A or 17A or 21A; consent of instructor. Class size limited to 35 students. Study of processes and products of rock deformation. Introduction to structural geology through a survey of the features and geometries of faults and folds, techniques of strain analysis, and continuum mechanics of rock deformation. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Cowgill, Oskin

101L. Structural Geology Lab (2)

Laboratory—6 hours; fieldwork—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 50 and 50L; Physics 7A or 9A; course 101 concurrently; consent of instructor. Class size limited to 15 students per session. Laboratory study of the processes and products of rock deformation. Introduction to the practice of structural geology through observations and analysis of rock deformation, including field measurement techniques and geologic mapping. GE credit: SciEng | SE, VL.—W. (W.) Cowgill, Oskin

103. Field Geology (3)

Fieldwork; laboratory. Prerequisite: course 101 and 101L; consent of instructor. Field mapping projects and writing geological reports. Weekly classroom meetings devoted to preparation of maps, cross sections, stratigraphic sections, rock descriptions, and reports.Seven-eight days on weekends during quarter. GE credit: SciEng | SE, VL, WE.—S. (S.) Cowgill, Lesher

105. Earth Materials: Igneous Rocks (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: courses 60, 62; Mathematics 16A or 17A or 21A; Chemistry 2B (can be concurrent). Origin and occurrence of igneous rocks. Laboratory exercises emphasize the study of these rocks in hand specimen and thin section. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—W. (W.) Cooper, Lesher

106. Earth Materials: Metamorphic Rocks (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 105. Physical and chemical properties of metamorphic rocks; interpretation of metamorphic environments. Laboratory exercises emphasize the study of these rocks in hand specimen and thin section. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—S. (S.) Lesher

107. Earth History: Paleobiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 3 or Biological Sciences 2A or Biological Sciences 10. Evolution and ecological structure of the biosphere from the origin of life to the present. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Carlson, Motani

107L. Earth History: Paleobiology Laboratory (2)

Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: courses 3 and 3L or Biological Sciences 2B; course 107 concurrently. Exercises in determining the ecological functions and evolution of individuals, populations, and communities of fossil organisms in field and laboratory. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Carlson, Motani

108. Earth History: Paleoclimates (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 50 or 116N or Environmental Science and Policy 116N; Chemistry 2A; consent of instructor. Geological and environmental factors controlling climate change, the greenhouse effect with a detailed analysis of the history of Earth's climate fluctuations over the last 600 million years. Past and present climate records are used to examine potential future climatic scenarios. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, SL, WE.—S. (S.) Spero, Montańez

109. Earth History: Sediments and Strata (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 50, 50L. Principles of stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis. Evaluation of historical and modern global changes in sedimentation within terrestrial and marine environments. Examination of the plate tectonic, climatic and oceanographic factors controlling the distribution and exploitation of economic fluids within sedimentary rocks. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Sumner

109L. Earth History: Sediments and Strata Laboratory (2)

Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 109 concurrently. Methods of stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of modern and ancient sediments. Identification of major sediment and sedimentary rock types. Outcrop and subsurface analysis of sedimentary basins. GE credit with concurrent enrollment in course 109. Includes four one-day field trips. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—W. (W.) Sumner

110. Summer Field Geology (8)

Fieldwork. Prerequisite: course 103, course 109; course 105 recommended. Advanced application of geologic and geophysical field methods to the study of rocks. Includes development and interpretation of geologic maps and cross sections; gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity and seismic surveys; and field analysis of plutonic and volcanic rock suites. Eight hours/day, six days/week for six weeks. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, VL, WE.—Su. (Su.) Oskin, Cowgill

115. Earth Science, History, and People (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing; course 1. Study of interplay between the Earth and its human inhabitants through history, including consideration of acute events such as earthquakes and eruptions as well as the geology of resources, topography, and water. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Wrt | OL, SE, WE.—S. (S.) Verosub

116N. Oceanography (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours; field work. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 or 16 or 50. Advanced oceanographic topics: Chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes; research methods and data analysis; marine resources, anthropogenic impacts, and climate change; integrated earth/ocean/atmosphere systems; weekly lab and one weekend field trip. (Same course as Environmental Science & Policy 116N.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—W. Hill, McClain

120. Origins: From the Big Bang to Today (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Limited enrollment. Long-term and large-scale perspectives on the origins of the universe, stars and planets, life, human evolution, the rise of civilization and the modern world. Multi-disciplinary approach to 'Big History' involving cosmology, astronomy, geology, climatology, biology, anthropology, archeology and traditional history. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (S.) Osleger

130. Non-Renewable Natural Resources (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 50. Origin, occurrence, and distribution of non-renewable resources, including metallic, nonmetallic, and energy-producing materials. Problems of discovery, production, and management. Estimations and limitations of reserves, and their sociological, political, and economic effects. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—F. (F.) Verosub

131. Risk: Natural Hazards and Related Phenomena (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Risk, prediction, prevention and response for earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, floods, storms, fires, impacts, global warming. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—W. (F.) Rundle

132. Introductory Inorganic Geochemistry (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 60 (can be concurrent); Chemistry 2B. Nucleosynthesis of chemical elements, physical and chemical properties of elements, ionic substitution, elemental partition, distribution and transport among planetary materials, basic thermodynamics and phase diagrams, isotopic geochronometers, stable isotope fractionation, mixing and dilution, advection and diffusion, geochemical cycles. Offered in alternate years.—F. Yin

134. Environmental Geology and Land Use Planning (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in Geology or course 1 or course 50; consent of instructor. Geologic aspects of land use and development planning. Geologic problems concerning volcanic and earthquake hazards, land stability, floods, erosion, coastal hazards, non-renewable resource extraction, waste disposal, water resources. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—W. (W.) Pinter

136. Ecogeomorphology of Rivers and Streams (5)

Lecture—1 hour; discussion/laboratory—2 hours; fieldwork; term paper or discussion. Prerequisite: upper division or graduate standing in any physical science, biological science, or engineering, and consent of instructor. Restricted to advanced students in the physical sciences, biological sciences, or engineering. Integrative multidisciplinary field analysis of streams. Class project examines hydrology, geomorphology, water quality and aquatic and riparian ecology of degraded and pristine stream systems. Includes cooperative two-week field survey in remote wilderness settings with students from diverse scientific backgrounds. GE credit: SciEng | SE, WE.—S. (S.) Pinter

138. Introductory Volcanology (4)

Lecture—2 hours; fieldwork—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 60 and 109; consent of instructor. Principles of physical and chemical volcanology. Taught in a volcanically active setting (e.g., Hawaii) with a strong field component. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F. (F.) Zierenberg

139. Rivers: Form, Function and Management (4)

Lecture—3 hours; fieldwork—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 50 or 50L; Mathematics 16B or 21B recommended. Analysis of river form and processes, emphasis on fluvial geomorphology, and river and stream restoration; case studies to illustrate concepts and applications. Two weekend field trips required. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F. Pinter

140. Introduction to Process Geomorphology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 50; Mathematics 16B or 21B. Quantitative description and interpretation of landscapes with emphasis on the relationships between physical processes, mass conservation, and landform evolution. Topics covered include physical and chemical weathering, hillslopes, debris flows, fluvial systems, alluvial fans, pedogenesis, eolian transport, glaciation and Quaternary geochronology. Offered in alternate years.—(F.) Oskin, Pinter

141. Evolutionary History of Vertebrates (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 3 or Biological Sciences 2A. Evolutionary history of vertebrates; fossil record and phylogeny; timing of major evolutionary events; appearance of major vertebrate groups; physical constraints in vertebrate evolution; paleobiogeography of vertebrates; effect of continental movement on vertebrate evolution; dinosaurs and other strange vertebrates. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—(W.) Motani

141L. Evolutionary History of Vertebrates Laboratory (1)

Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 141 (can be concurrent). Augments lecture course 141 through handling of specimens enabling in-person examination of three dimensional features observed in vertebrate skeletons, both fossil and living. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—(W.) Motani

142. Basin Analysis (3)

Laboratory—3 hours; lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 50, 50L, and 109. Analysis of sedimentary basins from initiation to maturity, including controls on sedimentary fill, subsidence analysis, sequence stratigraphy, core logs, and applications to petroleum exploration and hydrology. One two-day field trip. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, VL.—(F.) Sumner

143. Advanced Igneous Petrology (5)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 105, Mathematics 16C or 21C, Chemistry 2C. Physical and chemical properties of magmatic environments and processes of igneous rock formation. Laboratory study of representative igneous rocks. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE.—S. (S.) Cooper, Lesher

144. Historical Ecology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: upper division course in environmental science or ecology, or an introductory course in paleobiology. Ancient ecosystems and the factors that caused them to change. Species, expansion, evolution of new modes of life, geologically induced variations in resource supply, and extinction provide historical perspective on the biosphere of future. GE credit: SciEng | SE, WE.—W. (W.) Vermeij

145. Advanced Metamorphic Petrology (5)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 106; Hydrologic Science 134 or Chemistry 2C; Mathematics 16C or 21C. Metamorphic processes and the origin of metamorphic rocks. Laboratory study of representative rock suites. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE.—Lesher

146. Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2C, Physics 7C, and Mathematics 16C. Basic principles of nuclear chemistry and physics applied to geology to determine the ages of terrestrial rocks, meteorites, archeological objects, age of the Earth, to trace geological/environmental processes, and explain formation of the chemical elements in the Universe. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—F. Yin

147. Geology of Ore Deposits (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours; optional one-weekend field trip. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2C or Hydrologic Science 134, courses 60, 62, and 105. Tectonic, lithologic and geochemical setting of major metallic ore deposit types emphasizing ore deposit genesis, water/rock interaction and the environmental effects of mining. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—(S.) Zierenberg

148. Stable Isotopes and Geochemical Tracers (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2C or Hydrologic Science 134; courses 50, 50L, 60. Use of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in defining hydrologic processes; carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotopes as indicators of exchange between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Radiogenic, cosmogenic, and noble gas isotope tracers. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—S. Zierenberg

149. Geothermal Systems (3)

Lecture—3 hours; fieldwork. Prerequisite: courses 50 and 50L; Chemistry 2B. Geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of geothermal systems, including electrical power generation and direct use applications. Includes one day field trip on a weekend during the quarter. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Zierenberg

150A. Physical and Chemical Oceanography (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 116N or Environmental Science and Policy 116N; Physics 9B, Mathematics 21D, Chemistry 2C; consent of instructor. Physical and chemical properties of seawater, fluid dynamics, air-sea interaction, currents, waves, tides, mixing, major oceanic geochemical cycles. (Same course as Environmental Science and Policy 150A.) GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—F. (F.) McClain, Spero

150B. Geological Oceanography (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 50 or course 116N or Environmental Science and Policy 116N. Introduction to the origin and geologic evolution of ocean basins. Composition and structure of oceanic crust; marine volcanism; and deposition of marine sediments. Interpretation of geologic history of the ocean floor in terms of sea-floor spreading theory. (Same course as Environmental Science and Policy 150B.) GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) McClain

150C. Biological Oceanography (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; fieldwork. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 2A; a course in general ecology. Ecology of major marine habitats, including intertidal, shelf benthic, deep-sea and plankton communities. Existing knowledge and contemporary issues in research. Segment devoted to human use. One weekend field trip required. (Same course as Environmental Science and Policy 150C.) GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—Su. (Su.) Hill

152. Paleobiology of Protista (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 107 or Biological Sciences 2A; consent of instructor. Morphology, systematics, evolution, and ecology of single-celled organisms that are preserved in the fossil record. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—Hill

156. Hydrogeology and Contaminant Transport (5)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: Hydrologic Science 145, Civil and Environmental Engineering 144 or the equivalent. Physical and chemical processes affecting groundwater flow and contaminant transport, with emphasis on realistic hydrogeologic systems. Groundwater geology and chemistry. Fundamentals of groundwater flow and transport analysis. Laboratory includes field pumping test and work with physical and computer models. (Same course as Hydrologic Science 146.) GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Fogg

160. Geological Data Analysis (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21A. Introduction to quantitative methods in analyzing geological data including basic principles of statistics and probability, error analysis, hypothesis testing, inverse theory, time series analysis and directional data analyses. Use of computer in lectures and homework. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—W. (W.) Rundle

161. Geophysical Field Methods (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1 or 50; Mathematics 21C; Physics 7C or 9C. Geophysical methods applied to determining subsurface structure in tectonics, hydrogeology, geotechnical engineering, hydrocarbon and mineral exploration. Theory, survey design and interpretation of gravity, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, reflection and refraction seismology, and ground-penetrating radar measurements. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—F. (F.) Billen

162. Geophysics of the Solid Earth (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21C; Physics 7C or Physics 9C; consent of instructor. Theory and use of physics in the study of the solid earth. Gravity, magnetism, paleomagnetism, and heat flow. Application to the interpretation of the regional and large-scale structure of the earth and to plate tectonics. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—(W.) Kellogg

163. Planetary Geology and Geophysics (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21C; Physics 7C or Physics 9C; course 50 or course 36 or Astronomy 10G or Astronomy 10L or Astronomy 10S; consent of instructor. Principles of planetary science. Planetary dynamics, including orbital mechanics, tidal interactions and ring dynamics. Theory of planetary interiors, gravitational fields, rotational dynamics. Physics of planetary atmospheres. Geological processes, landforms and their modification. Methods of analysis from Earth-based observations and spacecraft. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—(W.) Yin

175. Advanced Field Geology (3)

Discussion—3 hours; fieldwork—6 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced field studies of selected geologic terrains, interpretation and discussion of field observations. May be repeated two times for credit when instructors varies. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—Cooper, Roeske

181. Teaching in Science and Mathematics (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours; field work—2 hours. Prerequisite: major in mathematics, science, or engineering; or completion of a one-year sequence of science or calculus and consent of the instructor. Class size limited to 40 students per section. Exploration of effective teaching practices based on examination of how middle school students learn math and science. Selected readings, discussion and field experience in middle school classrooms. (Same course as Education 181.) (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SS, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Horn

182. Field Studies in Marine Geochemistry (2-8)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—1-3 hours; fieldwork—6-40 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Marine geochemistry with the opportunity of going to sea or into the field on land. Techniques of sea-floor mapping using bottom photography, marine geochemical sampling, and method of data reduction and sample analysis. Analysis of data/samples collected. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—Hill

183. Teaching High School Mathematics and Science (3)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours; field work. Prerequisite: course 81/Education 81 or course 181/Education 181 and major in mathematics, science, or engineering; or completion of a one-year sequence of science or calculus and consent of the instructor. Limited to 40 students per section. Exploration and creation of effective teaching practices based on examination of how high school students learn mathematics and science. Field experience in high school classrooms. (Same course as Education 183.) GE credit: SocSci | OL, SS, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Pinter, Stevenson

190. Seminar in Geology (1)

Discussion—1 hour; seminar—1 hour; Presentation and discussion of current topics in geology by visiting lecturers, staff, and students. Written abstracts. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

192. Internship in Geology (1-12)

Internship. Prerequisite: upper division standing; project approval prior to internship. Supervised work experience in geology. May be repeated for credit for a total of 10 units. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

194A. Senior Thesis (3)

Prerequisite: open to Geology majors who have completed 135 units and who do not qualify for the honors program. Guided independent study of a selected topic, leading to the writing of a senior thesis. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of course sequence.) GE credit: SciEng | SE, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

194B. Senior Thesis (3)

Prerequisite: open to Geology majors who have completed 135 units and who do not qualify for the honors program. Guided independent study of a selected topic, leading to the writing of a senior thesis. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of course sequence.) GE credit: SciEng | SE, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

194HA. Senior Honors Project (3)

Independent study—9 hours. Prerequisite: open to Geology majors who have completed 135 units and who qualify for the honors program. Guided independent study of a selected topic, leading to the writing of an honors thesis. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: SciEng | SE, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

194HB. Senior Honors Project (3)

Independent study—9 hours. Prerequisite: open to Geology majors who have completed 135 units and who qualify for the honors program. Guided independent study of a selected topic, leading to the writing of an honors thesis. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) GE credit: SciEng | SE, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: senior standing in Geology or consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Graduate

205. Advanced Field Stratigraphy (3)

Lecture—1 hour; field work—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 109 and 110 or consent of instructor; course 206 recommended. Fieldwork over spring break. Application of stratigraphic techniques to research problems. Collection, compilation, and interpretation of field data. Integration of data with models for deposition and interpretations of Earth history. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Sumner

206. Stratigraphic Analysis (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 109, 109L or consent of instructor; course 144 recommended. Topics in advanced methods of stratigraphic analysis, regional stratigraphy and sedimentation, and sedimentary basin analysis. Emphasis on techniques used to interpret stratigraphic record and on current issues in stratigraphy and sedimentation. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Montańez

214. Active Tectonics (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Active deformation associated with faults, landslides, and volcanoes. Geodetic measurement techniques such as triangulation, trilateration, leveling, Global Positioning System (GPS), and radar interferometry. GPS data acquisition and analysis. Inversion of geodetic data and mechanical models of crustal deformation. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Oskin

216. Tectonics (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 or consent of instructor. Nature and evolution of tectonic features of the Earth. Causes, consequences, and evolution of plate motion, with selected examples from the Earth's deformed belts. Offered in alternate years.—Cowgill

217. Topics in Geophysics (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion and evaluation of current research in a given area of geophysics. Topic will change from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.—F, S. (F, S.) Billen, Kellogg, McClain

218. Analysis of Structures in Deformed Rocks (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 100, 100L, 101, 101L, 170; or consent of instructor. Recent advances in the understanding and analysis of structures in brittlely and ductilely deformed rocks. Detailed investigation of the characteristics of the structures, models for their formation, and applications to inferring the kinematics of larger scale tectonics. Offered in alternate years.Cowgill

219. Fracture and Flow of Rocks (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 100, 101, Mathematics 21 or 16, Physics 7 or 9, or consent of instructor. Origins of those structures in rocks associated with brittle and ductile deformation. Theoretical analysis, using continuum mechanics, and experimental evidence for the origin of the structures with emphasis on deformational processes in the earth. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Billen

220. Mechanics of Geologic Structures (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 170, Mathematics 21C, Physics 9A or 5A, or consent of instructor; Mathematics 21D and 22A recommended. Development in tensor notation of the balance laws of continuum mechanics, and constitutive theories of elasticity, viscosity, and plasticity and their application to understanding development of geologic structures such as fractures, faults, dikes, folds, foliations, and boudinage. Offered in alternate years.—Cowgill, Oskin

226. Advanced Sedimentary Petrology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 144 or consent of instructor. Advanced petrography and geochemistry of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Geochemical, textural and mineralogical evolution of sedimentary rocks reflecting depositional or burial processes. Laboratory work emphasizes thin section study of rocks. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Sumner

227. Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Discussion and application of stable isotope techniques for scientific research problems. Course emphasizes carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and sulfur isotopes. Laboratory will develop basic skills of cryogenic gas extraction and specific techniques for individual research using stable isotopes. Offered in alternate years.—Spero

228. Topics in Paleoceanography (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 108, 150A or consent of instructor. Critical discussion and review of selected topics in paleoceanography and paleoclimatology relating to the history of the processes controlling and affecting climate change and ocean circulation throughout the geologic record. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Spero

230. Geomorphology and River Management (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, course 139 or equivalent. Impacts of management and land use activities on the geomorphology of rivers and streams. Evaluation and use of analytical tools for river assessment. Assessment of river and stream restoration strategies and emerging issues in river management. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years.—Pinter

232. The Oceans and Climate Change (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Modern climate change and linkages between the ocean-atmospherecryosphere-terrestrial climate system. Importance of the ocean in forcing climate change, and the impacts of anthropogenic processes on the ocean. Topics vary. May be repeated three times for credit. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Hill

235. Surface Processes (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 50, 50L, 139; Mathematics 21B or 16B recommended. Recent advances in the analysis of landforms and their evolution. Detailed investigation of the tools used to document surface processes. Evaluation of concepts and processes that govern landscape evolution. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Oskin

236. Inverse Theory in Geology and Geophysics (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Inversion of data for model parameters. Evaluation of parameter uncertainties. Linear and nonlinear problems for discrete and continuous models. Bakus-Gilbert inversion. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) McClain

238. Theoretical Seismology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Elastodynamic wave equation. Greens functions and source representations. Ray theory. Plane and spherical waves and boundary conditions. Elastic wave propagation in stratified media. Offered in alternate years. (P/NP grading only.)—S. (S.) McClain

240. Geophysics of the Earth (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Earth Sciences and Resources 201, Physics 9B, Mathematics 22B. Physics of the earth's crust, mantle, and core. Laplace's equation and spherical harmonic expression of gravity and magnetic fields. Elastic wave equation in geologic media. Body and surface seismic waves. Equations of state, thermal structure of the earth. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Kellogg

241. Geomagnetism (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Nature and origin of the Earth's magnetic field. Present field and recent secular variation. Spherical harmonic analysis. Paleosecular variation. Polarity transitions and geomagnetic excursions. Statistics of polarity intervals. Dynamo theory. Planetary magnetism. Offered in alternate years.—F. (F.) Verosub

242. Paleomagnetism (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Principles and applications of paleomagnetism. Physical basis of rock and mineral magnetism. Field and laboratory techniques. Instrumentation. Analysis of paleomagnetic data. Statistical methods. Rock magnetic properties. Geological and geophysical applications. Offered in alternate years.—F. (F.) Verosub

246. Physical Chemistry of Metamorphic Processes (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 145, Chemistry 110A, or consent of instructor. Physiochemical principles of metamorphic mineral assemblages and methods of interpreting the paragenesis of metamorphic rocks. Offered in alternate years.

247. Metamorphic Petrology Seminar (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 145 or consent of instructor; course 246 recommended. Selected topics in metamorphic petrology (e.g., mass transport processes, tectonic settings, geothermometry, thermal structure of metamorphic belts, regional studies). May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.

250. Advanced Geochemistry Seminar (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 146 or consent of instructor. Critical review of selected topics in geochemistry including: ore genesis, hydrothermal and geothermal fluids, recent and ancient sediments, isotope geology, origin and chemistry of the oceans. Subject varies yearly depending on student interest. May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.—Cooper, Zierenberg

251. Advanced Topics in Isotope Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry (3)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Astrophysical context on origin of Solar System, synthesis of chemical elements, condensation sequence, star and planet formation, cosmochronology, building blocks of planets, development on planets' layered structure, atmosphere and hydrosphere and the role of comets/asteroids for volatile delivery. May be repeated three times for credit when topics differs. Offered in alternate years.—W. (W.) Yin

253. Current Topics in Igneous Petrology (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Geology; course 143 or consent of instructor. Topical seminar designed to help graduate students develop and maintain familiarity with current and past literature related to igneous rock petrogenesis. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.) Cooper, Lesher

254. Physical Chemistry of Igneous Processes (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 143 or consent of instructor; Chemistry 110A required; Chemistry 110B and 110C recommended. Introduction of modern concepts in chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, and fluid dynamics of magmatic systems for graduate students in petrology. Offered in alternate years.—Lesher

255. Experimental Petrology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 143 or consent of instructor. Introduction to techniques and methods of design and executing experiments on Earth-forming minerals and rocks. Problems and examples from igneous and metamorphic petrology will be utilized. Offered in alternate years.—Lesher

260. Paleontology (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology or a biological science. Selected problems in paleontology. Subject to be studied will be decided at an organizational meeting. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years.—F, S. (F, S.) Vermeij

261. Paleobiology Graduate Seminar 1: Evolutionary aspects (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Geology or a biological science; qualified undergraduates accepted on an exception-only basis. This course will treat one or more of several topics in paleobiology from a phylogenetic perspective, including major patterns in evolution, building the tree of life, extinction and phylogeny, phylogeny of major phyla, and the relation between taxonomy and phylogeny. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Offered in alternate years.—F, S. (F, S.) Carlson

262. Paleobiology Graduate Seminar: Methodological Aspects (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—2 hours. One or more major methods used in the study of fossils: Morphometrics and three-dimensional reconstruction of fossils, phylogenetic methodology, the application of geochemical techniques, and electron microscopy. May be repeated four times for credit if topic varies. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Motani

281N. Instrumental Techniques for Earth Scientists (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21A, 21B, 21C, Physics 7A, 7B, 7C or 9A, 9B, 9C or consent of instructor. Laboratory research techniques for new graduate students in Geology. Demonstration of and exposure to appropriate techniques in research. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Spero, Yin

285. Field Studies in Marine Geochemistry (2-8)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—1-3 hours; fieldwork—6-40 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Marine geochemistry with the opportunity of going to sea or into the field on land. Techniques of sea-floor mapping using bottom photography, marine geochemical sampling, and method of data reduction and sample analysis. Analysis of data/samples collected.—Hill

290. Seminar in Geology (1)

Seminar—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Presentation and discussion of current topics in geology by visiting lecturers, staff, and students. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

291. Geology of the Sierra Nevada (1)

Seminar. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Short oral presentations by students and faculty concerning results of their past work and plans for future work in the Sierra. A written abstract is required following the format required at professional meetings. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.)

292. River Forum (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Review and discussion of latest research and fundamental issues surrounding riverine systems, with emphasis on physical processes. Topics vary. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

293. Geologic Event of the Week (1)

Discussion—0.5 hours; seminar—0.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Seminar/discussion group to review and discuss recent earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other significant geologic events. The focus is on understanding the available observations, the physical processes behind each event, the geological setting, and societal consequences. May be repeated for credit three times for up to three units. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Kellogg

294. Structure/Tectonics Forum (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate student in geology or consent of instructor. Seminar/discussion group to review and discuss latest research in structural geology and tectonics, and on-going research of participants. Topics will vary each quarter depending on the interests of the group. Occasional field trips to areas of current interest. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (S/U grading only. Offered in alternate years.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Roeske

295. Advanced Problems in Geodynamics (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 100 and 101 or consent of instructor. Seminar dealing with problems in geodynamics. Topics will vary (e.g., ductile deformation mechanisms, brittle fracture, earthquake prediction, driving forces for plate tectonics, mantle convection). Emphasis on recent literature. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

296. Advanced Problems in Tectonics (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 or consent of instructor. Seminar dealing with current problems in tectonics of selected regions. Topics will change from year to year. Emphasis on study of recent literature. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—F. (F.) Cowgill

297. Geophysics Forum (1)

Seminar—0.5 hours; discussion—0.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student status in the Geology Department, or consent of instructor. Seminar/discussion group to review and discuss latest research in geophysics, and on-going research of participants. Topics will change each quarter depending on the interests of the group. May be repeated three times for credit. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Kellogg

298. Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. May be repeated up to 10 units for credit. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Professional

390. Methods of Teaching Geology (2)

Extensive writing or discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student standing in Geology. Introduction to graduate-level writing and undergraduate-level teaching skills in geology. Persuasive (proposal) writing workshop; discussions on campus teaching resources, presenting information, managing classroom dynamics, evaluating student performance. Participation in teaching program required for Ph.D. in Geology. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.) Billen

391. Ethical Issues in Earth Sciences (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Geology or consent of instructor. Reading and discussion of ethical issues arising in the earth sciences. Topics include scientific misconduct, gender equity in science, authorship of scientific papers, establishing priorities in research, and related issues. (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) 

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM