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Courses in Management (MGT/MGB/MGP)

Lower Division

11A. Elementary Accounting (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Basic concepts of accounting; interpreting and using financial statements; understanding accounting principles. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W. (F, W.)

11B. Elementary Accounting (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 11A. Theory of product costing; Analyzing the role and impact of accounting information on decision making; planning and performance evaluation. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.)

12Y. Navigating Life's Financial Decisions (3)

Lecture—2 hours; web virtual lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Survey of major life financial decisions (e.g., career choice, consumption v. saving, investments, mortgages, insurance) and how decision-making biases (e.g., overconfidence, present bias, limited attention) can lead to suboptimal choice. The course draws on research from economics, psychology, and sociology. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SS, QL.—W. (W.) 

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Seminar—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to all undergraduates, but is primarily intended for lower division students. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Upper Division

100. Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 11A. Course is open to all upper division undergraduate and graduate students, except those in the Graduate School of Management. Introduction to the concepts, methods, and uses of accounting and financial reporting.—F. (F.) 

120. Managing and Using Information Technology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Develop an analytical framework to manage and monitor business systems concerned with operational, human, and organizational interactions. Introduction to computer hardware, systems software, and information systems. Management of information technology and the impact of information systems on modern management. GE credit: SocSci | SS.Aram

140. Marketing for the Technology-Based Enterprise (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Quantitative analysis of needs in a product (technology-based) economy, with emphasis on how scientists, engineers, and business people interact to develop and market products and services.—W. (W.) Findlay

150. Technology Management (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Management of firms in high technology industries such as software development and biotechnology research. Motivating and managing workers, organizing for innovation, and making decisions. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—W, S, Su. (W, S, Su.) Olson

160. Financing New Business Ventures (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 11A; Mathematics 16B, 17B, or 21B; Statistics 13. Concepts/methods used to structure and finance new business ventures. Topics include evaluating the net social (financial) benefit of new investment projects; raising venture capital; the role of the venture capitalist; and the choice of organizational structure in new ventures. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F. (F.) Briscoe

170. Managing Costs and Quality (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 11A. Designing cost systems in high technology organizations and managing operations to maximize quality and minimize costs. Topics include activity based costing and management, managing quality and time to create value, ethical issues in cost assignment, and differential costing for decision. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) 

180. Supply Chain Planning and Management (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Course develops key concepts and relationships between supply chain design and business models and strategies. Much of the focus is on quantitative techniques for analysis and management of the production and delivery of goods and services by an organization. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F. (F.) Hopman

Graduate—Core Courses

200A. Financial Accounting (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management. Introduction to the concepts and objectives underlying the preparation of financial statements. Topics include understanding the accounting cycle, measurement and valuation problems associated with financial statement components, consideration of the usefulness of financial statements in the analysis of a corporation's operations.—F. (F.) M. Yetman

200B. Managerial Accounting (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management. Information managers should know to be effective, including: product costing, motivating people, and differential analysis for decision making. Includes team projects and written and oral presentations.—W, Su. (W, Su.) 

201A. The Individual and Group Dynamics (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management. Examines basic psychological and social psychological processes shaping human behavior and applies knowledge of these processes to the following organizational problems: motivation, job design, commitment, socialization, culture, individual and group decision making, and team building.—F. (F.) Elsbach

201B. Organizational Strategy and Structure (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first year courses in Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Open to MBA students only. Strategic management of organizations, including analysis of industries, firm resources and capabilities and corporate strategy. Strategy formulation, implementation and strategic decision-making. Firm and industry life cycles and change. Analysis of organizational design and structure including differentiation and integration.—F. (F.) Dokko

202A. Markets and the Firm (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management. Examines the interaction of consumers, firms and government, and the effect this interaction has on the use of resources and firm profitability. Fundamental economic concepts such as marginal analysis, opportunity cost, pricing, and externalities are introduced and applied.—W. (W.) Stango

202B. Business, Government, and the International Economy (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 202A. Examines the influence of government and international factors on business. Topics include distribution of income, business cycles, inflation and interest rates, the federal debt, monetary policy and international trade and finance.—W. (W.) Taylor

203A. Data Analysis for Managers (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management MBA program or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistics and data analysis for managerial decision making. Descriptive statistics, principles of data collection, sampling, quality control, statistical inference. Application of data analytic methods to problems in marketing, finance, accounting, production, operations, and public policy.—W. (W.)  

203B. Forecasting and Managerial Research Methods (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 203A. Practical statistical methods for managerial decision making covers regression analysis, time series analysis and forecasting, design and analysis of experiments in managerial research and contingency table analysis. Application of these methods to marketing, finance, accounting, production, operations, and public policy.—W. (W.) Tsai

204. Marketing Management (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management. Analysis of market opportunities, elements of market research, development of marketing strategies, market planning and implementations, and control systems. Consumer and industrial markets, market segmentation, pricing strategies, distribution channels, promotion, and sales.—S. (S.) Naik

205. Financial Theory and Policy (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management. Corporate financial policy and investment management. Covers capital budgeting, optimal financial structure, cost-of-capital determination, risk measurement. Develops basic valuation principles for investments with long-lived and risky cash-flows, and extends these to derivative securities, asset portfolios, investment management and hedging.—S. (S.) Barber

206. Decision Making and Management Science (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student in the Graduate School of Management MBA program or consent of instructor. Develops decision-making and problem-solving skills in conjunction with a quantitative model-building approach. Emphasizes how structured modeling techniques, probability forecasts, simulations, and computer optimization models are used in the overall process of making decisions in an uncertain environment.—Su. (Su.) R. Chen

207. Management Information Systems (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate student or consent of instructor. Introduction to computer programming and data handling skills. Use of computer in organizations, emphasis on managerial aspects of computing. Standard and nonstandard uses of data files, centralization versus decentralization of computing, office automation, computer security.—F. (F.) Aram

Electives

Students must complete the Management core course requirement before enrolling in any of the following courses, or petition with consent of the instructor.

215. Business Law (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of Administration core requirements or petition with consent of instructor. Introduction to law and legal process in the United States. Sources of law. Structure and operation of courts, federal-state relationships, fundamentals of administrative law, fundamentals of business law.—W, Su. (W, Su.)

216. Managing Professionals, Budgets, Controls and Ethics (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Performance measures, budgetary controls and ethical pressures which occur at middle management levels in service-type operations. Addresses such organizations as engineering, medical groups, law offices, management consultants.—F. (F.) Suran

217. The Business of Politics (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Class size limited to 30 students. Covers the roll of business and business leaders as policy and political actors at the federal, state, and local level, including government relations programs, regulation of business by government, political campaigns, and policy as a business advantage.—W, Su. (W, Su.) M. Smith

220. Management of Social Networks (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 201A. Open to MBA students only. Principles and applications of social network theory: coordinating divergent interests to create value for individuals and organizations. Emphasis on conceptual models, web-based diagnostic tools, and practical applications.—F. (F.) 

223. Power and Influence in Management (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Investigation of the bases of power in organizations and the tactics used to translate power into influence. Topics include the control of resources (including information), social psychological processes (including commitment), the construction of meaning, and ethics.—F. (F.) Palmer

224. Managing Human Resources (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Open to MBA students only. Restricted to MBA students only. Explore choices firms make in managing workers--decisions as to wages, benefits, working conditions, and other management policies and practices. Analyze employment systems' fit with firms' environments and strategies, and the consequences of choices managers make regarding policies and practices. Not open to students who have taken MGT 224 or MGP 224.—W, Su. (W, Su.) Hsu

234. Pricing (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first year core courses at the Graduate School of Management or equivalent, including courses 202A & 203B. Restricted to students in the MBA Program. Combines lectures, cases and homework to teach students tools and skills necessary to analyze pricing situations, make pricing decisions, and implement them, in a systematic manner.—S. (S.) 

239. Digital Marketing (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 204. Course equips students for a career in digital marketing and social media. Topics include online advertising, search engine optimization, interactive mktg, online privacy issues, e-commerce, social influence, social network theory, measurement of social influence, integrating social and traditional media.—S. (S.) Peters

240. Management Policy and Strategy (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: first-year core courses of M.B.A. program. Examines the scope of missions, objectives strategies, policies, structures, measurements and incentives which bear on the management of an organization. Real client organizations, in the private and public sectors, are assigned to student teams as the subjects of study.—F. (F.)  

241. New Product Development (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 249 or consent of instructor. Open to graduate students in the Graduate School of Management. State-of-the-art concepts and methods to enhance the effectiveness of new product development activities. Focuses on the understanding of managerial issues and acquiring the ability to solve problems.—W, Su. (W, Su.) Aravindakshan

242. Marketing Communications (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Issues in designing a marketing communications strategy. Topics include mass and direct communications, institutional aspects of advertising, consumer behavior, evaluating ad effectiveness, determining ad budget, creative strategy, and use and abuse of promotions.—S. (S.) 

243. Customer Relationship Management (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first-year core courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Restricted to MBA students only. Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is a management approach under which marketing activities are organized and measured around customers (rather than around brands.) This approach is appealing because customers, not brands, are those who make buying decisions.—F. (F.)  Aravindakshan

244. New and Small Business Ventures (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Student teams develop complete business plans for their own start-up ventures. Process includes: elevator pitch, business strategy, comprehensive bottoms-up financial projections, capital requirements, product differentiation, competitive, alliance, and go-to- market strategy development, investor presentation, and comprehensive written business plan.—F, W. (F, W.) Lowe

245. Business Writing (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first-year core courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Restricted to MBA students only. Techniques for sharpening writing skills are introduced, along with grammatical structure, word choice, and punctuation. Learn to develop styles that are pitch-perfect for given situations and to think strategically about each communication challenge in a management setting.— W. (W.) 

246. Negotiation and Team Building (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 202, 205. Basic theory of negotiation; applies theory to process of building teams to achieve business purposes. Covers integrative and distributive strategies of claiming value, how to recognize bargaining tricks, uncovering hidden agendas, brainstorming to extend Pareto frontier.—W. (W.) Olson

247. Customer Service as a Marketing Tool (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Understanding the distinct features of services, how to create value through service, methods of building strong relationships with customers, methods of measuring and building customer satisfaction, and measuring the financial impact of service improvement.—F. (F.) 

248. Marketing Strategies (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Examines process by which organizations develop strategic marketing plans. Includes definition of activities and products, marketing audits, appraising market opportunities, design of new activities and products, and organizing marketing planning function. Applications to problems in private and public sector marketing.—F. (F.)  Rubel

249. Marketing Research (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Course addresses the managerial issues and problems of systematically gathering and analyzing information for making private and public marketing decisions. Covers the cost and value of information, research design, information collection, measuring instruments, data analysis, and marketing research applications.—W. (W.) Bunch

250. Technology, Competition and Strategy (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first-year core courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Why is software typically so defective? Why do many firms in the IT industry give away their best products free? This course helps you analyze questions like these by modeling competition and strategy in the network, technology and information industries.—W. (W.)  Bhargava

251. Management of Innovation (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Managing innovative enterprise in changing and uncertain environments. Covers technology forecasting and assessment, program selection and control, financial management, regulation, and ethics.—F. (F.) Hargadon

252. Managing for Operational Excellence (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Open to students in the Graduate School of Management. Explores the management of operations as applied to manufacturing as well as services provided both inside and outside the organization. Develop an understanding of how uncertainty affects planning and delivery by looking at fundamental models of operations.—S. (S.)  Woodruff

253. Corporate Social Responsibility (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Goal in this course will be to develop a thought process and approach to corporate social responsibility that students will be able to build on during their post-school leadership roles, whether as corporate executives, entrepreneurs, or NGO leaders.—S. (S.) Ansbach

255. Entrepreneurship and Venture Investment Clinic (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Class size limited to 30 students. Provides the necessary analytical and design tools to create business ideas and refine business models based on emerging technologies. Students learn to work closely in small teams to synthesize technical, strategic, and marketing needs into designs for new ventures.—S. (S.) Vaidya

258. Mergers and Acquisitions (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Course focuses on the market for corporate acquisitions and restructuring activity. Topics include: sources of value creation; takeovers; anti-takeover provisions; bidding strategies; use of leverage in buyouts; regulatory risk and hurdles; and, valuation approaches for highly leveraged transactions.—F. (F.) Marquez

259. Banking and the Financial System (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 205 or Management 205 or Management Working Professional 205; consent of instructor. Analyzes the role of financial markets and institutions in allocating capital. Focuses on: bank lending; debt securities; financial market innovations; regulation; functions of commercial banks and other financial intermediaries. Utilizes case studies.—S. (S.) Marquez

260. Corporate Finance (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Focuses on planning, acquiring, and managing a company's financial resources. Includes discussion of financial aspects of mergers and other forms of reorganization; analysis of investment, financial, and dividend policy; and theories of optimal capital structure.—S. (S.) Scherbina

261. Investment Analysis (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Examines asset pricing theories and relevant evidence, including the investment performance of stocks and bonds. Topics include the efficiency of markets, domestic and international portfolio diversification, factors influencing the value of stocks and other investments, and portfolio management and performance.—F. (F.) J. Chen

262. Money and Security Markets (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Examines how money and securities markets are organized; how public agencies, businesses, others obtain and invest funds in those markets. Relationship between interest rates, monetary policy, government's role in improving capital markets, approaches to assessing changes in regulation of specific markets.—F. (F.) 

263. Derivative Securities (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Open to students enrolled in the MBA program. Behavior of options, futures, and other derivative securities markets and how public agencies, business and others use those markets. Trading strategies involving options, swaps, and financial futures contracts. Pricing of derivative securities, primarily by arbitrage methods.—F. (F.) Edelen

264. Business Taxation (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Analysis of the impact of business taxation on investment, production, and finance decisions. Discussion of the relationship between business organization and tax liability. Course is not intended for tax specialists.—F. (F.)  

265. Venture Capital and the Finance of Innovation (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first-year core courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Examines venture capital finance and the related practice of R&D finance. Goal is to apply finance tools and framework to the world of venture capital and financing of projects in high-growth industries.—W. (W.) Yasuda

266. International Finance (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 207 or the equivalent. Studies fixed and floating exchange-rate systems. Topics include determinants of a nation's balance of international payments; macroeconomic interdependence of nations under various exchange-rate regimes and its implications for domestic stabilization policies; and the international coordination of monetary and stabilization policies.—Su. (Su.) 

267. Teams and Technology (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to working professional MBA students. Theory and practice of managing teams with primary goals of: providing conceptual guidelines for analyzing and diagnosing group dynamics and determining strategic options as a manager; imparting interpersonal skills for implementing effective strategies; understanding how technological change affects team processes.—S. (S.)  Olson

268. Articulation and Critical Thinking (3)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours. With commitment to this course, students will become competent public speakers, write well at a level expected in business, think efficiently and critically about business challenges and have a useful personal code of ethics to shape their actions and decisions. No student may repeat course for credit.—F. (F.) D. Kennedy

269. Business Intelligence Technologies-Data Mining (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Descriptive and Predictive Data mining methods covering association rules, clustering, classification, text mining, etc. Big data Technologies. Business applications. Hands-on data mining skills. Business intelligence for managerial decision making.—S. (S.) Yang

270. Corporate Financial Reporting (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Analyzes and evaluates contemporary issues in financial reporting and develops implications of those issues for business decision makers, investment managers, and accounting policymakers.—F. Su. (F. Su.) Wong

271. Strategic Cost Management (3)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Theoretical frameworks and associated techniques for using organizational design and cost management to achieve a sustainable, profitable cost structure. Topics include: target costing, process design for low cost, total cost of ownership, cost of customers, implementing structural change, and incentives.—W. (W.) Anderson

272. Evaluation of Financial Information (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Studies how investors, creditors, others use accounting and other information in making rational investment, lending decisions. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of financial information in a variety of contexts. Where applicable, recent research in finance and economics is discussed.—W. (W.) Skaife

273. Accounting and Reporting for Government Nonprofit Entities (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Concepts, methods, and uses of accounting and financial reporting by governmental and nonprofit entities. Introduction to budgeting and performance evaluation, and accounting for entities such as hospitals, universities, and welfare agencies.—S. (S.) 

274. Corporate Governance (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: restricted to full-time MBA students or consent of instructor. Discusses how corporations can better operate in the interests of shareholders and public. Directly relevant to managers, consultants in compensation and incentives, staff working on mergers and acquisitions, corporate regulators, shareholder rights activists, and board members.—S. (S.) 

276. Real Estate, Finance and Development (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Focus on single family, attached, detached, multi-family, and light commercial development. Students will study factors which make up successful real estate developments. Course will consider financial aspects involved in land acquisition, land development, construction, and project lending.—Su. (Su.) 

281. Systems Analysis and Design (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Design and specification of computer-based information systems. Applications systems development life cycle, use requirements and feasibility assessment, logical and physical design, program development and testing, conversion and implementation.—W. (W.) 

282. Supply Chain Management (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of first year core courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent; knowledge of Microsoft Excel. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Matching supply with demand is a primary challenge for a firm: excess supply is too costly, inadequate supply irritates customers. Matching supply to demand is easiest when a firm has a flexible supply process, but flexibility is generally expensive.—S. (S.) R. Chen

284. Applied Linear Models for Management (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Covers regression, analysis of variance, and multivariate analysis. Topics will focus on applications to management and policy problems.—W. (W.) 

285. Time Series Analysis and Forecasting (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 203B. Considers application of time series methods to evaluation and forecasting problems. Covers univariate and multivariate ARIMA models and transfer function models. Applications will be in such areas as economics, finance, budgeting, program evaluation, and industrial process control.—S. (S.)  Tsai

286. Telecommunications and Computer Networks (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 280. Communication system components; common carrier services; design and control of communications networks; network management and distributed environment; local area networks; data security in computer networks.—S. (S.) 

287. Business Database and Database Marketing (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Practical introduction to fundamental principles of database management systems and database marketing. Database design. SQL queries. Concepts of database marketing, data warehouse, data visualization and big data analytics.—W. (W.) Yang

288. Special Topics in Management of Information Systems (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Managerial aspects of information systems. Topics stressing applications in organizations chosen from: economics of computers and information systems, decision support systems, management of computer-based information systems, office automation.— Topkis

290. Topics in General Management (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Advanced topics in general management. Varied topics to cover more extensively issues discussed in courses 201A and 201B, or current business interest topics in fields of business writing, business communications, development, or workplace processes. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)  

291. Topics in Organizational Behavior (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Advanced topics in social psychology and sociology of organizations. Varied topics to cover more extensively issues discussed in courses 201A and 201B, or current business interest topics in fields of organization design, strategy, development, or workplace processes. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

292. Topics in Finance (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Contemporary and emerging issues in finance. Application of modern techniques of finance to business problems. Use of appropriate electronic database and research techniques. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

293. Topics in Marketing (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent Advanced topics in marketing, which may include marketing research, new product development, brand management, pricing, distribution management, service marketing, hitech marketing, advertising, sales promotions, marketing through the Web. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

294. Topics in Accounting (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Contemporary and emerging issues in financial management accounting. Application of modern techniques of evaluation and analysis of financial information. Use of appropriate electronic database and research techniques. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

295. Topics in Information Technology (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Applications of information technology to management and management of information technology. Adaptation to the dynamic nature of the field. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

296. Topics in Technology Management (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Cyclical nature of innovation and technological change, features of innovative firms and industries, national innovation systems, and impact of information technologies on innovation processes. May be repeated for credit.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) 

297. Topics in International Management (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: completion of all first-year graduate courses at the Graduate School of Management or the equivalent. Broader environment in which U.S. firms and their foreign competitors operate. Integration of material from other topics courses (marketing, strategy, finance, accounting, information technology, technology management) into the international setting. May be repeated for credit.—W. (W.) 

298. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Bunch

299. Individual Study (1-12)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Bunch

Professional

401. Crisis Management (1)

Laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Establishes and explores the defining characteristics of crises. Will learn to anchor crisis management firmly within overall strategic management and also acquire a set of useful tools and techniques for planning for and handling actual crises. (S/U grading only.)—W. (W.) 

402. Crisis Communications and Reputation Management (1)

Laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Intended to provide you with an understanding of the framework and tools necessary to successfully address communications and reputation management tasks in a variety of crisis situations.—S. (S.) 

403. Business Statistics Practicum (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: MGT, MGP, or MGB 203A; MGT, MGP, or MGB 203B concurrently or completed. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Applies techniques and concepts in business statistics to real case studies.—F. (F.) 

404. Organizational Change Management (1)

Laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Challenges in getting significant changes made in organizations. Learn Organization Change Management (OCM) techniques and discuss case situations where OCM techniques play a role. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.)  Mathur

405. Business Literature (1)

Laboratory/discussion—1 hour. Will examine Business history – historical trends that might influence contemporary business. Some argue that the recent collapse of our financial system might have been averted if business leaders had a better sense of history. (S/U grading only.) —W. (W.) 

406. Ethical Issues in Management (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Explores the philosophical foundation of ethical theory and its recent applications to business situations. Professional codes of ethics, such as those promulgated by educational, managerial, engineering, scientific, medical and legal professional societies, are presented. (S/U grading only.)—W. (W.) 

407. Storytelling for Leadership (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Internalize the fundamental principles behind stories that educate, influence, motivate, inspire, persuade and connect. (S/U grading only.)—Su. (Su.) Charnsupharindr

408. The Business of the Media (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Focuses on the media industries and how emerging digital technologies are disrupting the way media consumption, distribution and business models work. Will highlight the economics of several media, both news and entertainment.—Su. (Su.) Louie

409. Managing Multi-Asset Class Investment Portfolios (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: courses 202A, 203A, 205. Examines top down management of multi-asset class portfolios. Topics include bonds, hedge funds, private equity, real estate, commodities, endowments, return generation, performance analysis, credit cycles, financial crises, manager selection, investment policy, and investment careers. Student teams present endowment portfolio recommendations.—S. (S.) Dolan

410. Corporate Governance (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Covers recent and not-so-recent business and accounting scandals, discuss how corporations can better operate in the interests of shareholders and the public, and learn from people who rely on corporate governance in making investment decisions. (S/U grading only.)—W. (W.) 

411. Turnaround Management (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Evaluate the financial performance of a company, identify opportunities for improvement, propose real solutions to enhance performance, and most important inspire action in staff. (S/U grading only.)—S. (S.)  

412. International Marketing (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Understanding basic concepts of international marketing. Understanding and managing heterogeneous, dynamic, and interdependent environments across countries. How to develop and implement an international marketing strategy: where and how to compete, how to adapt your marketing mix. (S/U grading only.)—W. (W.) Peters

413. Sustainable Business Ventures: Business and Energy (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Introduction to sustainability goals, indicators, values, measurement techniques, and practice how it applies to large and small enterprise.—W. (W.) Jaffe

414. Multi-Channel Marketing (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Multi-channel marketing strategies empower managers to create value for different customer segments. Covers the necessary concepts to evaluate and select go-to market strategies in order to capitalize on the ubiquity of modern customers. (S/U grading only.)—W. (W.) Rubel

415. Climate Risks and Opportunities (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Provide a working knowledge of the risks and opportunities arising from climate change and climate policy for businesses.—Su. (Su.) Mazzacurati

416. Topics in Private Equity (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 205. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Focuses on the finance principles related to the risk and return of the private equity (PE) industry, valuation of PE target companies, the structuring of leveraged buyouts (LBOs), and the management of portfolio companies. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.) Yasuda

417. Incentives and Controls (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Understand how organizations use financial and nonfinancial performance management and incentive systems to motivate people and manage resources. (S/U grading only)—S. (S.) 

418. Scientific Discovery and Business Innovation at Scale in the Food and Agriculture Sector (1)

Lecture—3 hours. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Scientific discovery and business innovation within the food and agriculture sector profoundly influences the sustainability of society and enterprise competitiveness. Students will learn how business innovation models co-exist antagonistically or synergistically with scientific discovery and its influence on enterprise competitiveness. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Schmitz

419. Business Strategy Consulting Skills (1)

Lecture—5 hours. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Students will learn practical business consulting skills which will help apply strategy theories in the workplace. Students will learn and practice tools to frame and analyze problems, conduct research, communicate findings and navigate client relationships. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.) Bethlahmy

420. Advanced Optimization in a Python-based Modeling Language (1)

Web virtual lecture—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 252 or MGT 252 or MGP 252, and course 206 or MGT 206 or MGP 206. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Covers advanced optimization modeling techniques and practical application of modern, scalable modeling language. Techniques will be developed using examples from production planning in a supply chain, but students may explore other areas of application of optimization for their final project. (S/U grading only.)—W. (W.) Woodruff

422. Behavioral Finance and Valuation (1)

lecture—1 hour. Prerequisite: MGT 260 or MGP 260 or course 260, and MGT 261 or MGP 261 or MGP 261 or course 261. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Investor psychology and market frictions can cause asset prices to deviate from fundamental values, creating profit opportunities for sophisticated investors. The course will cover techniques of financial analysis with the goal of learning how to value assets and identify mispricing. (S/U grading only.)—S. (S.) Scherbina

423. Leader as Coach: An Introduction to Coaching Skills for Leaders (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Course introduces the fundamental coaching skills and coaching models that leaders can apply in everyday interactions with their team and colleagues in order to build trust, overcome challenges and help others discover their own full potential. (S/U grading only.) Offered irregularly.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Charnsupharindr

424. Practicum for Managing People in Modern Organizations (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 224. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Provides solid grounding in the management of work and the employment relationship. Examines firms' interrelated policies and practices for managing people.—W. (W.) Hsu

425. Digital Marketing Techniques (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Course provides students with an introduction to digital marketing. The course introduces MBA students to the fundamental aspects and tools of online marketing communication, i.e., how organizations use digital channels to effectively communicate their value propositions to the target customers. (S/U grading only.) Offered irregularly.—S. (S.) Blanchard

426. The Business of Healthcare (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program (Business Administration—Working Professional, Business Administration—Bay Area, Business Administration—Full-Time). Course is intended to provide students with an overall understanding of the unique business aspects of the healthcare industry. (S/U grading only.) Offered irregularly.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Bird, Murin

427. The Business of Healthcare (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program (Business Administration—Working Professional, Business Administration—Bay Area, Business Administration—Full-Time). Course looks at the pitfalls of implementing international strategies, and suggest several accessible, yet powerful frameworks to help international managers implement strategies successfully and completely. (S/U grading only.) Offered irregularly.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Katzenstein

428. Renewable Energy Ventures: Planning, Funding and Regulatory Risk Assessment for Entrepreneurs and Investors (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Advanced innovation lab will introduce students to issues addressed by entrepreneurs and investors in renewable ventures. Lectures, simulations, case studies and practical experience of the presenters will be delivered. Offered irregularly.—Su. (Su.) Schefsky

429. Detection and Prevention of Asset Misappropriation Fraud in the Workplace (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Course will discuss the fundamentals of fraud detection and prevention in the workplace. Students will learn the major schemes involving workplace fraud, how management can detect fraud and what policies and procedures can be implemented to prevent fraud. Offered irregularly.—F, Su. (F, Su.) Briscoe

430. Learning From Catastrophes: Lessons for Managers (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Restricted to students enrolled in the MBA program. Catastrophes unfold in surprisingly similar ways. In this course, students will analyze catastrophes to understand these common patterns and investigate how they can be prevented and mitigated. Students will then apply these lessons to management to gain unconventional insights. Offered irregularly.—Su. (Su.) Pugnetti

434. Practicum for Pricing (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 234. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Enhance understanding of the principles and concepts learned in Pricing by (1) teaching the necessary statistical and mathematical skills, and (2) requiring a report for a real Pricing case.—W. (W.) 

440. Integrated Management Project (3)

Project—3 hours. Prerequisite: first-year core courses of MBA program. Applies classroom learning to solve complex business challenges for real world clients. Student teams learn practical consulting skills while their clients benefit from the student's experience, insights, and work product.—W. (W.) Dinunzio, Lowe

440A. Integrated Management Project (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: first-year core courses of MBA program. Restricted to full-time MBA students. Applies classroom learning to solve complex business challenges for real world clients. Student teams learn practical consulting skills while their clients benefit from the student's experience, insights, and work product. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—F. (F.) 

440B. Integrated Management Project (3)

Project—3 hours. Prerequisite: first-year core courses of MBA program. Restricted to full-time MBA students. Applies classroom learning to solve complex business challenges for real world clients. Student teams learn practical consulting skills while their clients benefit from the student's experience, insights, and work product. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—W. (W.) 

442. Practicum for Marketing Communication (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 242. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Provides experience applying concepts learned in Marketing Communications to a realistic advertising or communication problem faced by firms.—S. (S.)  

443. Practicum for Customer Relationship Management (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 243. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Hands-on training in applying Customer Relationship Management concepts and metrics to secondary data. Enhances ability to interpret results and decide the right type of marketing actions by requiring an executive report at the end of the quarter.—F. (F.)  Aravindakshan

448. Practicum for Marketing Strategies (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 248. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Provides opportunities to apply the concepts covered in the Marketing Strategies class through a group project involving the analysis of strategic marketing decisions based on business-related issues, simulation and modeling.—F. (F.) Rubel

449. Marketing Research Practicum (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 249. Restricted to students in the MBA program, or in some cases with permission of instructor. Provides opportunities to apply the concepts and methods covered in the Marketing Research class. Hands-on and project-based, work could be either individual or in groups depending on enrollments and/or interests of students.—S. (S.) Bunch

450. Practicum for Technology Strategy and Competition (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 250. Restricted to students in the MBA program. In-depth practicum project course. Apply theories, concepts, and models, learned in course 250 to a real-world business problem, through data collection, data analysis, simulation, modeling and post-model interpretation.—W. (W.) Bhargava

460. Practicum for Corporate Finance and Real Estate (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 260. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Work in groups to select and value a financial entity. It could be a firm, a sports player, a building, a project, or a patent. Grade based on an in-class presentation and a write-up.—S. (S.) Scherbina

461. Practicum for Investment Analysis (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 261. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Provides practical experience applying concepts learned in Investment Analysis to a realistic portfolio management setting via a hypothetical exercise. Produce a realistic executive summary and presentation of an investment proposal for a hypothetical client.—F. (F.)  R. Chen

464. Practicum for Taxes and Business Strategy (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 264. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Practical application project drawing from the tax planning theory contained in course 264. Project consists of a business formation and operation, change in organization (incorporation), and movement into multi-national and multi-jurisdictional tax.—F. (F.)  R. Yetman

465. Practicum for Venture Capital (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 265. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Provides an opportunity to apply concepts learned in Venture Capital in a realistic setting. Complete project analyzing a potential investment in a hypothetical venture and prepare an deal term sheet/investment agreement.—S. (S.) Yasuda

467. Practicum for Teams and Technology (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 267. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Groups investigate the performance, creativity, conflict, information sharing, and leadership behaviors of a real world team. Provide consulting advice to the team, which not only gives analytic skills, but also builds presentation skills.—S. (S.) Olson

469. Practicum for Business Intelligence Technologies (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 269. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Projects applying concepts learned in Business Intelligence Technologies to real business problems.—W. (W.) Yang

482. Practicum for Supply Chain Management (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: MGT, MGP, or MGB 282 is a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Restricted to students in the MBA program. Provides experience applying concepts learned in Supply Chain Management to a realistic management setting via a project.—S. (S.) R. Chen

490. Directed Group Study Management Practicum (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; sponsorship of a GSM Academic Senate faculty member; approval of graduate adviser. Provides opportunity for students to gain experience in applying business methodologies previously acquired in other GSM courses. May be repeated for credit. Offered irregularly.—Su. (Su.)  

498. Directed Group Study Management Practicum (1-12)

Project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; sponsorship of a GSM Academic Senate faculty member, and approval of graduate adviser. Provides the opportunity for students to gain experience in applying business methodologies previously acquired in other GSM courses. May be repeated up to 6 units for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Bunch

499. Directed Individual Study Management Practicum (1-12)

Project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; sponsorship of a Graduate School of Management Academic Senate faculty member and approval of graduate adviser. Provides the opportunity for students to gain experience in applying business methodologies previously acquired in other Graduate School of Management courses. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Bunch

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Updated: June 14, 2016 3:57 PM