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Courses in Human Development (HDE)

Questions pertaining to the following courses should be directed to the instructor or to the Human and Community Development Advising Center in 1303 Hart Hall 530-752-2244.

Lower Division

12. Human Sexuality (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Vocabulary, structure/function of reproductive system; sexual response; pre-natal development; pregnancy and childbirth; development of sexuality; rape and sexual assault; birth control; sexually transmitted diseases; homosexuality; establishing/maintaining intimacy; sexual dysfunctions; communication; enhancing sexual interaction, cultural differences in attitudes towards sexuality. GE credit: SocSci, Div | ACGH, DD, SS.—F, S. (F, S.) 

92. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: field work experience or at least one course (e.g., course 100A, 100B, 140 or 140L) related to fieldwork assignment; consent of instructor. Supervised internship, off campus and on campus, in community and institutional setting. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 units or if involves progressively greater (supervised) participation in program delivery or assessment. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

98. Directed Group Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

100A. Infancy and Early Childhood (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1, Biological Sciences 1A, or 2A, or 10 or 10V; or Molecular and Cellular Biology 10; or Neurology, Physiology, and Behavior 10 or 12; or Microbiology 10. Biological, social, and cultural influences in the psychological growth and development of children, prenatal through age six. Two observations of preschool children required.—F, W, Su. (F, W, Su.) Hibel

100B. Middle Childhood and Adolescence (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1; and either course 100A or Psychology 140. Interplay of biological and social-cultural factors in the emotional, cognitive and social development from middle childhood through adolescence.—W, S, Su. (W, S, Su.) Guyer, Nishina

100C. Adulthood and Aging (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Development during early, middle, and late adulthood; biological, cognitive, and psycho-social aspects of adult development. Emphasis on normative patterns of development which characterize "successful aging."—F, S. Miller, Ober

101. Cognitive Development (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 100A or 100B or Psychology 140. Pass One restricted to Human Development or Psychology majors. Theories, methods, evidence, and debates in the field of cognitive development, such as nature/nurture, constraints on learning, and the role of plasticity. Topics include attention, memory, concepts about the physical and social world, and language. (Same course as Psychology 141.) GE credit: Wrt | WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Chen, Gibbs, Goodman, Graf Estes, Lagattuta, Rivera

102. Social and Personality Development (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 100A or 100B or Psychology 140. Pass One open to Human Development or Psychology majors. Social and personality development of children, infancy through adolescence. Topics include the development of personality, achievement motivation, self-understanding, sex-role identity, and antisocial behavior. Emphasis on the interface between biological and social factors. (Same course as Psychology 142.) GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Belsky, Gibbs, Hastings, Thompson

103. Cross-Cultural Study of Children (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 100A or Psychology 140; consent of instructor. Cross-cultural studies of children in developing countries and among minority groups in the U.S. GE credit: SocSci, Div | ACGH, DD, SS, WC.—F. (F.)

110. Contemporary American Family (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or Sociology 1 or Sociology 2. Factors currently influencing American families including changing economic conditions, changing sex roles, divorce, and parenthood; theories and research on family interaction.—W. (W.) Conger

117. Longevity (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instructor. Nature, origin, determinants, and limits of longevity with particular reference to humans; emphasis on implications of findings from non-human model systems including natural history, ecology and evolution of life span; description of basic demographic techniques including life table methods. (Same course as Entomology 117.) GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, SL, WE.—F. (W.) Carey

120. Research Methods in Human Development (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Statistics 13 or 13V or Education 114 or Psychology 41 or Sociology 46A and 46B. Scientific process, research designs, and experimental controls; APA manuscript style and scientific writing; statistical analysis and interpretation of results. Laboratory exercises to collect data, analyze and interpret results, and write scientific papers. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—F, S. (F, S.) Liu, Nishina

121. Psychological Assessment (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: courses 100A or 100B; Statistics 13 or 13V or Psychology 41 or Sociology 46A and 46B. Current issues and methodology related to the process of psychological assessment with children. Offered irregularly.

130. Emotionally Disturbed Children (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: courses 100A and 100B; or Psychology 140; consent of instructor. Discussion of psychosis, neurosis, behavior disorders, and learning difficulties in children.—W. (W.) Choe

132. Individual Differences in Cognition (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1; course 100A or 100B. Individual differences in cognition, including learning disabilities and giftedness. Education implications and neurodevelopmental substrates of individual differences in cognition. Offered irregularly.

140. Communication and Interaction with Young Children (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 100A; concurrent enrollment in course 140L required; consent of instructor. Enrollment requires sign up for laboratory time at the Child and Family Studies Center located at 244 First Street, Davis, CA. Integration of research, theory and practice in child development, emphasizing the role of relationships in creating a growth-promoting environment for young children. Includes: peer relationships, emotional understanding and self regulation, attachment, communication and school readiness.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Chen

140L. Laboratory in Early Childhood (3-5)

Laboratory—6-15 hours; laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 140, must be taken concurrently for first 3 units of credit; students must contact the Center for Child and Family Studies to enroll; consent of instructor. Limited enrollment. Application of theories of learning and development to interaction with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers at Early Childhood Laboratory. Applied skills in communication, guidance and curriculum. May be repeated two times for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Chen

141. Field Study With Children and Adolescents (4-6)

Lecture—2 hours, fieldwork—6-12 hours. Prerequisite: course 100A or 100B; consent of instructor. Study of children's affective, cognitive and social development within the context of family/school environments, hospitals and foster group homes. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 units.—F, S. (F, W, S.) 

142. Field Study with Emotionally Distressed Children and Adolescents (4-6)

Discussion—1.5 hours; fieldwork—6-12 hours. Prerequisite: course 130 (may be taken concurrently); consent of instructor. Field study with children who are identified as emotionally distressed, including those with internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems. May be repeated for credit for a total of 12 units following consultation with and consent of instructor.

143. Field Studies of the Elderly (4-6)

Discussion—2 hours; field work—6-12 hours. Prerequisite: course 100C or 160 may be taken concurrently; consent of instructor. Apply theory and research on adult development and aging, work with older adults in a variety of settings, and develop skills relevant to that application. Develop a small research project.—W. (W.) Miller, Ober

160. Social Aspects of Aging (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 100C. How the social context affects adult development and aging. Emphasis on demography, social policy, culture, and adaptation. Oral histories as class projects. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: Div.—F. (F.)

161. Applied Cognition and Aging (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1; course 100C. Principles from cognition and aging and applies these to real-world concerns in areas including education, technology, job performance, and health. Considers physical and social changes in later life that impact functioning. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—S. (S.) Miller

163. Cognitive Neuropsychology in Adulthood and Aging (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1; course 100C recommended. Theories, methods, and findings concerning the relationship between cognitive processes and brain functioning. Readings, lectures, and in-class discussions cover research on normal younger and older adults, neuropsychological case studies, and selected patient groups (e.g., amnesia, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease). Offered in alternate years.—F. (F.) Ober

190C. Introductory Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: involvement in ongoing research; consent of instructor. Instructors lead discussions with undergraduate students who involve themselves in a research project. Research papers are reviewed and aspects of project proposals developed out of class are presented and evaluated. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing and consent of instructor. Supervised internship off and on campus, in community, and institutional settings. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Graduate

200A. Early Development (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing; basic biology or physiology; one upper division course in psychology or a related field; one upper division or graduate course in developmental psychology (may be taken concurrently). Theory and research on the biological, social, cognitive, and cultural aspects of development from conception to the age of five years.—F. (F.) Belsky, Chen, Hibel

200B. Middle Childhood and Adolescence (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing; basic biology or physiology, and at least two upper division or graduate-level courses in psychology or related fields. Theory and research on biological, cognitive, social, and cultural influences on behavioral development from age five years until late adolescence.—W. (W.) Choe, Guyer, Nishina

200C. Development in Adulthood (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Theory and research focusing on social, personality, cognitive, and biological development from early to late adulthood. Emphasis is on theory development and continuity and change.—S. (S.) Miller, Ober

203. Adolescent Behavioral and Emotional Development (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200B. Analysis of recent theories, research methods, and major findings on adolescent behavioral and emotional development, including contextual and genetic influences on adolescence, pubertal transitions, and social/family contexts and processes. Emphasis on multi-level mechanisms underlying adolescent behavioral and emotional development. Offered in alternate years.

204. Developmental Neuroscience and Adolescent Psychopathology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Human Development, Psychology, Education, Neuroscience or consent of instructor. Introduction to human developmental neuroscience. Understanding of adolescence and its characterization as a time of risky and unhealthy behavior and vulnerability to onset of mental disorder as well as issues around plasticity of the adolescent brain and prevention/intervention. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Guyer

205. Path Analysis, Factor Analysis, and Structural Equation Modeling (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 204B or equivalent graduate courses in statistics or permission of the instructor; familiarity with multiple regression and the basics of matrix algebra. Graduate standing in HDGG, Psychology, Sociology, Education, or a related social science, or permission of the instructor. Introduction of basic concepts, principles, and applications of structural equation modeling including path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, multiple-group modeling, and latent growth curve modeling. Offered in alternate years.

207. Topics in Applied Cognitive Aging (4)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Human Development Graduate Group, Psychology, Education, or a related social science, or consent of the instructor. Apply principles from cognitive aging to real-world concerns in areas such as education, technology, job performance, and health. Examine how physical and social changes occurring in later life impact functioning. Offered in alternate years.—F. Miller

210. Theories of Behavioral Development (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing in behavioral sciences. Consideration of enduring issues in theories of behavioral development; analysis of adequacy of major theoretical schools (e.g., social learning, Piagetian) as scientific theories. Offered in alternate years.

211. Physiological Correlates of Behavioral Development (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An overview of mechanisms of organismic development and the implications of developmental biology for the analysis of behavioral ontogeny; consideration of parallels between processes of organismic development and behavioral development in children and infra-human mammals. Offered in alternate years.—(S.)

220. Research Methods in Human Growth and Development (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Statistics 13 or the equivalent and at least two upper division courses in Human Biology or Developmental Psychology. Overview of qualitative and quantitative approaches to empirical inquiry in the social sciences, with a focus on theory and research methods in biological growth and cognitive and social/emotional development from prenatal period to death.—W. (W.) Liu

232. Cognition and Aging (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 200C. The manner in which cognitive processes are affected by aging as well as an understanding of the changes in the central nervous system occurring with aging. Offered in alternate years.—Ober

234. Children's Learning and Thinking (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A or Psychology 212 recommended. Analysis of theories, research methods, and major findings of children's higher-order cognition, including origins of knowledge, development of problemsolving skills, reasoning strategies, and scientific concepts, with an emphasis on the underlying mechanism involved in children's thinking and learning processes. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Chen

238. The Context of Individual Development (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Human Development, Child Development, Education, Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology, or consent of instructor. Analysis of human development within the context of daily life. Contextualizing theories and methods of developmental psychology will be distinguished from contextual theories and methods. Developmental psychology models will be distinguished from child psychology models. Offered in alternate years.

239. Developmental Trajectories in Typical and Atypical Children; Birth to Five (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Human Development, Psychology, Sociology, a related social science, or permission of the instructor. Discuss theories of development in typical and atypical children from birth to five from a socio-cultural perspective including parent-child interaction, peer interactions, cultural contexts of learning, as well as theoretical and empirical issues for understanding continuities and discontinuities in development. Offered in alternate years.—S. 

240. Peer Relationships During Adolescence (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Graduate standing in Human Development, Psychology, Education, or consent of instructor. Course examines the role of peer relationships in adolescent development including forms and functions at the individual, dyadic and group levels. Ethnicity and cross cultural research will be discussed. Emphasis on methodology, including surveys, peer nominations/sociometrics, experimental, and observational designs. Offered irregularly.—K. Conger

250. Current Research on Family Relationships (4)

Lecture/discussion—6 hours; term paper. Graduate standing in Human Development Graduate Group, Psychology, Sociology, a related social science, or consent of instructor. Discussion of theories, methods, and current research on the nature and development of sibling, romantic, and parent-child relationships across the lifespan. Emphasis on interpersonal and family processes examined in ethnic/cultural contexts. Implications for individual development will be addressed.—S. K. Conger

252. Family Research, Programs and Policy (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Graduate standing in Human Development, Psychology, Sociology, related social sciences, or consent of instructor. Course examines the competing interests of research, policy, and service on current issues of family functioning and individual well being. The course considers communication barriers between researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) K. Conger

290. Seminar (3)

Seminar—3 hours. Discussion and evaluation of theories, research, and issues in human development. Different topics each quarter.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

290C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Supervising instructors lead research discussions with their graduate students. Research papers are reviewed and project proposals are presented and evaluated. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

291. Research Issues in Human Development (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the Behavioral Sciences. In-depth presentations of research issues in particular areas of behavioral development.—F, W. (F, W.) R. Conger

292. Graduate Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: consent of faculty (internship sponsor) and satisfactory completion of placement-relevant course work, for example: Education 213, 216; course 222, 242; Law 272, 273. Individually designed supervised internship, off campus, in community or institutional setting. Developed with advice of faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit up to 12 units if justified skill acquisition and promise of informing evaluation research. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

298. Group Study (1-5)

299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

Professional

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

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Updated: November 21, 2017 12:17 PM