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Courses in Hydrologic Science (HYD)

Questions pertaining to the following courses should be directed to the instructor or to the Resource Sciences Teaching Center in 113 Veihmeyer Hall or in 1150 Plant and Environmental Sciences Building 530-752-1603.

Lower Division

10. Water, Power, Society (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Water resources issues. How water has been used to gain and wield socio-political power. Water resources development in California as related to current and future sustainability of water quantity and quality. Roles of science and policy in solving water problems. (Same course as Science and Society 10.) GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Wrt | SE or SS, SL.—S. (S.) Fogg

47. Watershed Processes and Water Quality in the Tahoe Basin (2)

Lecture/laboratory—21 hours; fieldwork—9 hours; discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of environmental, soil, or hydrologic sciences. Watershed processes, runoff water-quality management, restoration in Lake Tahoe Basin. Soils, precipitation-runoff, revegetation and adaptive management related to erosion control, effective solutions, development of restoration strategies. Students develop field restoration. Course involves 3 days of instruction in Tahoe City. (Same course as Environmental Science and Management 47.) Not open to students who have successfully completed Environmental and Resource Sciences 47. (Formerly Environmental and Resource Sciences 47.) GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.—Su. (Su.) Grismer

92. Hydrologic Science Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: lower division student, consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in Hydrologic Science. Internship supervised by a member of the faculty. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered irregularly. (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

103N. Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 9B. Fluid mechanics axioms, fluid statics, kinematics, velocity fields for one-dimensional incompressible flow and boundary layers, turbulent flow time averaging, potential flow, dimensional analysis, and macroscopic balances to solve a range of practical problems. (Same course as Biological Systems Engineering 103.) Offered irregularly. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL.—F. (F.) 

110. Irrigation Principles and Practices (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 7A; Soil Science 100 recommended. General course for agricultural and engineering students dealing with soil and plant aspects of irrigation and drainage. Soil-water principles including water movement, plant responses to irrigation regimes, water use by crops; also irrigation systems and water quality. Not open for credit to students who have completed Water Science 110. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—(S.) Goldhamer, Grattan

124. Plant-Water-Soil Relationships (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hours. Prerequisite: one upper division course in soil science, such as Soil Science 100; and one upper division course in plant science or plant biology, such as Plant Biology 111; or consent of instructor. Principles of plant interactions with soil and atmospheric water environments and practical applications to crop management (e.g., irrigation) and plant eco-physiology (e.g., drought). Not open for credit to students who have completed Water Science 104. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.—S. (S.) Shackel

134. Aqueous Geochemistry (6)

Lecture—4 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2B. Chemistry of natural waters; dielectric properties of water; thermodynamic and mass-action relations; metal hydrolysis; acid-base equilibria; metalcoordination chemistry; solubility calculations; electron-exchange reactions; sorptive partitioning; ion exchange; and dissolved organic matter. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—S. (S.) Hernes, Parikh

141. Physical Hydrology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Physics 9B, Mathematics 21B; course 100 recommended. Introduction to the processes that constitute the hydrologic cycle. Special emphasis on a quantitative description of the following processes: precipitation, infiltration, evaporation, transpiration, surface runoff, and groundwater runoff. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL, VL.—F. (F.) Puente

142. Systems Hydrology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 141 or Civil and Environmental Engineering 142. General course considering hydrologic processes from a systems or statistical model perspective. General probability concepts are applied to frequency, time series and spatial data analysis. Linear systems are also considered in conjunction with Kalman filter techniques. GE credit: SciEng | OL, QL, SE.—W. (W.) Puente

143. Hydrological Processes in Ecosystems (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 141 or Environmental and Resource Science 100. Movement and storage of water are integral parts of landscape and ecosystem functioning. Hydrological processes in individual ecosystems and the role of water linking the myriad components of the landscape. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.—(W.) Pasternack

144. Groundwater Hydrology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16B or 21A; course 103 or Engineering 103 recommended. Fundamentals of groundwater flow and contaminant hydrology. Occurrence, distribution, and movement of groundwater. Well-flow systems. Aquifer tests. Well construction operation and maintenance. Groundwater exploration and quality assessment. Agricultural threats to groundwater quality: fertilizers, pesticides, and salts. (Same course as Hydrologic Science 144.) Offered alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL, VL.—F. (F.) Harter

146. Hydrogeology and Contaminant Transport (5)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—2 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 144 or Civil and Environmental Engineering 144 or the equivalent. Physical and chemical processes affecting groundwater flow and contaminant transport, with emphasis on realistic hydrogeologic examples. Groundwater geology and chemistry. Fundamentals of groundwater flow and transport analysis. Laboratory includes field pumping test and work with physical and computer models. (Same course as Geology 156.) GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Fogg

147. Runoff, Erosion and Water Quality Management in the Tahoe Basin (3)

Lecture/laboratory—30 hours; fieldwork—15 hours; discussion—10 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: Physics 7B or 9B, Mathematics 16C or 21C, Civil and Environmental Engineering 142 or course 141 or Environmental and Resource Sciences 100. Practical hydrology and runoff water quality management from Tahoe Basin slopes. Development of hillslope and riparian restoration concepts, modeling and applications from physical science perspectives including precipitation-runoff relationships, sediment transport, and detention ponds. Five days of instruction in Tahoe City. (Same course as Biological Systems Engineering 147.) GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.—Su. (Su.) Grismer

150. Water Law (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor or upper division standing. Principles and issues of California Water Law. Types of water rights, groundwater rights and management, and protection of instream uses. Water projects, role of federal government and federal/state relations. Basic water quality acts, endangered species act, water transfers and current water issues. GE credit: SocSci | ACGH, SS.—W. (W.) Cahill

151. Field Methods in Hydrology (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours; fieldwork—3 hours. Prerequisite: Environmental and Resource Sciences 100 or course 141. Measurement methods and data analysis for evaluation of water storage, movement and contamination in the field. Equipment such as data loggers, water and sediment samplers, pressure transducers, weather stations, surveying equipment, and flow meters will be used. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.—W. Pasternack

182. Environmental Analysis using GIS (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—4 hours. Prerequisite: Applied Biological Systems Technology 180 or the equivalent GIS experience and skills; general biology and/or ecology courses recommended. Ecosystem and landscape modeling with emphasis on hydrology and solute transport. Spatial analysis of environmental risk analysis including ecological risk assessment, natural resource management. Spatial database structures, scripting, data models, and error analysis in GIS. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Applied Biological Systems Technology 182.) GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL, VL.—W. (W.) Hijmans

192. Hydrologic Science Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-40 hours. Prerequisite: completion of 84 units and consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in water science. Internship supervised by a member of the faculty. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: senior standing. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM