Jump to content

Courses in Public Health Sciences (SPH)

Lower Division

92. Internship in Community Health (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing; consent of instructor. Students apply theory and concepts learned in the classroom through field work in a community health agency. (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

101. Introduction to Public Health (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: undergraduate standing. Provide basic concepts and controversies in public health, basic science of public health, social and behavioral factors in health and disease, environmental and occupational health issues, the relationship of public health to the medical care system and health care reform. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci | SE or SS.—W, S. (W, S.) McCurdy

102. Introduction to Human Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—1.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Learn and understand the practice of epidemiology as it relates to human populations. The content is fundamental to the Public Health minor and a required core course. GE credit: SE.—S. (S.) Garcia

104. Globalization and Health: Evidence and Policies (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Provides an overview of the evidence on the multiple effects of globalization policies on health. GE credit: SS, WC.—W. (W.)  De Vogli

105. Health Disparities in the U.S. (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Introduction to the principles and practice of health disparities research. GE credit: DD, SS.—W. (W.) Garcia

132. Health Issues Confronting Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Health issues confronting Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. (Same course as Asian American Studies 132.) GE credit: SocSci | SS. —W. (W.) 

160. General Health Education and Prevention (5)

Lecture—4 hours; discussion—1 hour. Open to students in the internship program for the Health Education Program only; class size limited to 50 students. Topics include addiction, substance abuse/prevention, nutrition, stress management, physical fitness, body image, reproductive anatomy and physiology, contraceptive options, safer sex, sexual health, healthy relationships, and other general wellness/health promotion topics. Practice in peer counseling and outreach presentations. (P/NP grading only.)—Su. (Su.) 

161. Campus Alcohol/Drug Abuse Prevention Program Peer Educator Training (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; practice—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 160 (may be taken concurrently); consent of instructor. Preparation for internship in campus and community substance abuse prevention and educational intervention. Addiction and other physiological responses to alcohol and other drugs. Harm-reduction strategies for individuals and target populations. High risk behaviors. Practice in peer counseling skills and outreach presentations to small and large groups. (P/NP grading only.)—S. (S.) 

162. Health Advocates Peer Educator Training (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; practice—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 160 (may be taken concurrently); consent of instructor. Preparation for internship in campus and community health promotion and risk reduction. Nutrition, stress management, physical fitness, body image and disordered eating, skin cancer prevention, and other general wellness/health promotion topics. (P/NP grading only.)—S. (S.) 

175W. Health Policy and Health Politics (4)

Seminar—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Restricted to students attending UC Washington Center program. Following the model of a Congressional subcommittee, identification of four salient health policy issues for study, research, and development of model policies to address them. (Same Course as UC Davis Washington Center 175.) GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, OL, SS, WE.—S. (S.) Wintemute

190C. Research Conference in Community and International Health (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Weekly conference on research problems, progress, and techniques in Community and International Health. Critical discussion of recent journal articles. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

192. Internship in Community Health Practice (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: upper division and graduate students; consent of instructor. The student, through fieldwork in a community health agency, learns to apply theory and concepts learned in the classroom. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Study in Community and International Health (1-5)

Prerequisite: undergraduate standing and consent of instructor. Study and experience for undergraduate students in any number of areas in community and international health. (P/NP grading only.)

199. Research in Community and International Health (1-5)

Prerequisite: undergraduate standing; consent of instructor. Student will work with faculty member in areas of research interest, including but not limited to injury control, international health, health policy, occupational and environmental health, health promotion and wellness, women's health, and health demographics. (P/NP grading only.)

Graduate

201. Introduction to Public Health (3)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Provides an overview of public health. Covers the history of public health in the U.S.; defines its major functions and constituencies; and, introduces fundamental principles of epidemiology, biostatistics, behavioral sciences, environmental health, infectious diseases, and reducing health disparities. May be repeated one time for credit.—Su. (Su.) Garcia

203. Learning and Teaching in Public Health Contexts (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Aimed at current and future public health professionals interested in learning more about the educational potential for interactions with community members and other health professionals—all stakeholders in improving the health of communities.—S. (S.)  Cassady, Ziegahn

204. Globalization and Health: Evidence and Policies (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Open to graduate student standing. In-depth integration of advanced epidemiological concepts. Provides an overview of the evidence on the multiple effects of globalization policies on health.—F. (F.) De Vogli

205. Health Disparities in the U.S. (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Introduction to the principles and practice of health disparities research. GE credit: DD, SS.—W. (W.) Garcia

207. Advanced Epidemiologic Methodology (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 206. In-depth integration of advanced epidemiological concepts. Theory, methods, and applications for observational studies including random and systematic error, confounding, counterfactuals, causal inference, effect modification, internal and external validity, estimability, and interpretation of effect measures, and advanced study designs. (Same course as Epidemiology 206.)—S. (S.) Hertz-Picciotto, Kass

209. History of Epidemiology in Public Health (2)

Lecture—0.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Introduction to the history of epidemiology in solving major public health problems. Original historical articles will be read/discussed. Topics may include: infectious disease, accidents/adverse events, nutritional deficiencies, community vaccination trials, occupational exposures, cancer, birth defects, cardiovascular disease, and smoking. (Same course as Epidemiology 209.)—W. (W.) Hertz-Picciotto

210. Public Health Informatics (2)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—2 hours. Restricted to upper division or graduate standing. Collection, verification, and utilization of data related to populations; infrastructure, functions, and tools used to generate public health knowledge supporting public health practices and policy development/dissemination. (S/U grading only.)—Su. (Su.) Hogarth

211. Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: introductory epidemiology course (e.g., Epidemiology 205). Infectious disease epidemiology and prevention, with emphasis on human and veterinary diseases of global health importance. Major global health epidemics and challenges of infectious diseases, by mode of transmission. (Same course as Epidemiology 231.)—W. (W.) DeRiemer

212. Migration and Health (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Principles of migration and health. Topics will include demographics, public health invention programs, health care delivery, occupational health, and effects of international migration on the health in communities of origin, transit and destination. Guest presentations by outside experts. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Schenker

222. Social & Behavioral Aspects of Public Health (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor required; graduate standing, Statistics 102 and 106. Theories and strategies of health behavior change at the individual, group, community, and environmental levels. Examples include: transtheoretical model, social networks, and social marketing. Theories are applied to solve common public health problems (cancer, obesity, smoking, and HIV/AIDS.—W. (W.) De Vogli

223. Obesity Prevention in Community Settings (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Look at causes of the obesity epidemic in the U.S.; identify and critically assess the research literature on various prevention strategies; understand, and apply evidence-based public health strategies to combat obesity; and translate the science to a general audience.—F. (F.)  Cassady

232. Health Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Health communication theories and research traditions. Topics include consumer health information seeking; physician-patient interaction; information, social marketing, "edutainment," and media advocacy campaigns; social networks and coping; media influences on health; and new communication technologies in health promotion and healthcare delivery. (Same course as Communication 232.) Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Bell

244. Introduction to Medical Statistics (4)

Lecture/discussion—6 hours; laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Introduction to statistical methods and software in clinical, laboratory and population medicine. Graphical and tabular presentation of data, probability, binomial, Poisson, normal, t-, F-, and Chi-square distributions, elementary nonparametric methods, simple linear regression and correlation, life tables. Only one unit of credit for students who have completed Statistics 100 or Preventive Veterinary Medicine 402.—Su. (Su.) Yang

245. Biostatistics for Biomedical Science (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Clinical Research 244 or course 244 or the equivalent; consent of instructor. Analysis of data and design of experiments for laboratory data. (Same course as Clinical Research 245.)—W. (W.) Kim

246. Biostatistics for Clinical Research (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 245 or Clinical Research 245. Emphasizes critical biostatistics for clinical research and targets biomedical audience. Students will develop understanding for basic planning and analysis of clinical studies and learn to develop collaborations with biostatisticians. (Same course as Clinical Research 246.) May be repeated for credit. Offered in alternate years.—W. Qi

247. Statistical Analysis for Laboratory Data (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Clinical Research 245 or course 245. Statistical methods for experimental design and analysis of laboratory data including gene expression arrays, RNA-Seq, and mass spec. (Same course as Clinical Research 247.)— S. Rocke

252. Social Epidemiology (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Epidemiology 205A; consent of instructor. Social determinants of health; psychosocial and physiological pathways; health and social inequality; gender and racial/ethnic disparities in health; social support, social cohesion and health; social gradient in behavioral risk factors; social ecological approaches to health intervention; interventions addressing social determinants. (Same Course as Epidemiology 252.)—S. (S.) 

255. Human Reproductive Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Preventative Veterinary Medicine 405, 406, Physics 220, Physiology 222 or equivalents or consent of instructor. Human reproductive effects and risk of reproductive disorders, examined from macro- and micro-environmental exposures in community and occupational settings, epidemiologic study designs and analyses. Offered in alternate years.—F. Hertz-Picciotto

262. Principles of Environmental Health Science (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor required. Principles, approaches and issues related to environmental health. Recognizing, assessing, understanding and controlling the impact of people on their environment and the impact of the environment on the public.—F. (F.) Bennett

264. Public Health Econometrics (2)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Principles of demand and supply; elasticity; benefits and costs; least squares regression; stepwise regression; economic and statistical significance; fixed and random effects; longitudinal data; non- linear relations; continuous and binary variables; instrumental variables; attrition bias; tobit regression; Two-part cost model. (S/U grading only.)—S. (S.)  Leigh

266. Applied Analytic Epidemiology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—2 hours. Prerequisite: Preventive Veterinary Medicine 404 or consent of instructor. Principles and applications in analysis of epidemiologic data. Methods of analyzing stratified and matched data, logistic regression for cohort and case-control studies, Poisson regression, survival-time methods. (Same course as Population Health and Reproduction 266.)—S. (S.) Kass, Kim

273. Health Services Administration (3)

Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Limited enrollment. Structure and function of public and private medical care. Topics include categories and trends in national medical spending, predictors of patient use, causes of death, managed care, HMOs, Medicare, Medicaid, costs of technology, and medical care in other countries.—W. (W.) Leigh

276. Critical Assessment in Health Policy and Economics (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Course aims to develop critical reading skills of the health policy and health economics literature, mainly following the microeconomic paradigm and analytical techniques. Some basic concepts of micro economic theory will be explained in the class.— F, W. (F, W.) Yoo

290. Topics in Public Health (1)

Seminar. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to students in Master of Public Health program, or permission of instructor. Seminar on key issues and current topics in public health. Course begins in August SSII. Students must enroll in August, then Fall and Winter. The course is a series but grades and units are given at end of each quarter. May be repeated four times for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Kass, McCurdy

295. International Health (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Forum for learning health issues and health care systems in other countries. Topics include health care for refugees, the impact of political strife on health, the health care professional in international settings. (S/U grading only.)—S. (S.) Koga

297. Public Health Practicum (1-16)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Open to Master of Public Health students. Practical fieldwork experience in public health. Placement site will vary based on the interest and experience of each student. May be repeated four times for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) McCurdy

298. Study in Community and International Health (1-5)

Prerequisite: graduate student in good academic standing; consent of instructor. Study and experience for graduate students in any number of areas in community and international health. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

299. Research in Community and International Health (1-12)

Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Student will work with faculty member in areas of research interest, including but not limited to injury control, international health, health policy, occupational and environmental health, health promotion and wellness, womens health, and health demographics. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

Professional

402. Introductory Medical Spanish (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: medical student or consent of instructor. The vocabulary needed to conduct a basic history and physical examination in Spanish. (H/P/F grading only.)—S. (S.) 

461. Clerkship in Community Health Group Practice (3-9)

Clinical activity—full time (2-6 weeks). Prerequisite: third- or fourth- year medical student. Overview of local community health in group practice situations. Students participate in treatment at several clinic sites in Yolo County. Topics include primary care, environmental health, maternal and child health, jail health, and preventive health care for the aged. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

465. Community Health Preceptorship (3-18)

Clinical activity—5-40 hours. Prerequisite: fourth-year medical student; consent of instructor. Participate at state or county health department or other public health organization in on-going investigations into current public health problems, e.g., birth defects, cancer control, diabetes, hypertension, injury control, infectious diseases, aging, Alzheimer's disease, and smoking and tobacco use control. (H/P/F grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) McCurdy

466. Occupational and Environmental Medicine Elective (6-12)

Clinical activity; laboratory. Prerequisite: fourth-year medical student in good academic standing; consent of instructor. Participate in activities of Occupational and Environmental Health Unit. Major activity is involvement in an epidemiologic research project of the University. Participate in Occupational and Environmental Medicine Clinic at UC Davis Medical Center and other sites, as arranged. (H/P/F grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) McCurdy

470. Clinical Selective in Occupational and Environmental Medicine (3-6)

Clinical activity—9-18 hours. Prerequisite: fourth-year medical student in good academic standing; consent of instructor. Outpatient clinical experience in Occupational and Environmental Medicine at UCDMC and other sites, as arranged. Gain experience in evaluating occ/env medical conditions, use of medical literature resources, the worker's compensation system, and toxicological principles. Students may take up to four weeks for six units. (H/P/F grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) McCurdy

480. Insights in Occupational and Environmental Medicine (1-3)

Clinical activity—3-9 hours. Prerequisite: first- or second-year medical student in good academic standing; consent of instructor. Observe and participate in research and clinical activities in occupational and environmental medicine which include conferences, occupational and environmental medicine clinical activities and field visits. Develop and present small individual research projects. (P/F grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)  McCurdy

495. International Health (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: medical student in good academic standing; consent of instructor. Forum for learning health issues and health care systems in other countries. Topics include health care for refugees, the impact of political strife on health, the health care professional in international settings. (H/P/F grading only.)—S. (S.)  Koga, Schenker

496. Current Issues in Public Health (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Topical issues in public health. Speakers from the local public health community address issues such as disease control programs, access to care. May be repeated up to three times for credit. (P/F grading only.)—S. (S.)  McCurdy

498. Study in Public Health Sciences (1-6)

Prerequisite: medical student in good academic standing and consent of instructor. Study and experience for medical students in areas in community and international health. (H/P/F grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

499. Research in Public Health Sciences (1-9)

Prerequisite: medical students with consent of instructor. Work with faculty member in areas of research interest, including but not limited to public health, injury control, international health, health policy, occupational and environmental health, health promotion and wellness, women's health, and health demographics. (H/P/F grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) 

Page content manager can be reached at Catalog-Comment@ucdavis.edu.


Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM