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Courses in Exercise Biology (EXB)

Lower Division

10. Exercise and Fitness: Principles and Practice (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Human movement from physiological, psychological, sociological, and historical perspectives. Biology and psychology of exercise across the human lifespan. Not open for credit to students who have completed an upper division Exercise Biology course. GE credit: SciEng, Div | SE, SL.—I, II. (I, II.) Barr, Shaffrath

90C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: lower division standing in Exercise Biology or related biological science and consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in course 99. Research findings and methods in exercise biology. Presentation and discussion of research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

90X. Lower Division Seminar (1-2)

Lecture—1-2 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing and consent of instructor. Gives freshman or sophomore level students the opportunity to study a special topic in the general area of Exercise Biology in a small class setting. GE credit: SciEng | SE.

92. Exercise Biology Internship (1-5)

Internship—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, dependent on availability of intern positions. Work experience in the application of physical activity programs to teaching, recreational, clinical or research situations under department faculty supervision. May be repeated one time for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

97T. Tutoring in Exercise Biology (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing and consent of instructor. Assisting the professor by tutoring students in exercise biology course-related projects. May be repeated for credit for 10 units including courses 97TC, 197T and 197TC. No tutorial units will be counted towards the Exercise Biology major. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

97TC. Tutoring Exercise Biology in the Community (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and chairperson. Tutoring in the community in exercise biology related projects under the guidance of the faculty. May be repeated one time for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

98. Directed Group Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and chairperson. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

 Upper Division

101. Exercise Physiology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101. Physiologic responses to acute exercise, and physiologic adaptations to both chronic exercise (training) and selected environmental stresses. Emphasis on the muscular, metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory and renal responses and adaptations to exercise. Only 1 unit of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 101. Only 3 units of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 102. Not open for credit to students who have completed Exercise Science 101 and 102 (Former Exercise Science 101 and 102). GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—I. (I.) Bodine, Shaffrath

102. Introduction to Motor Learning and the Psychology of Sport and Exercise (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 recommended. Theoretical and practical issues in motor learning, sport psychology, and exercise psychology. Emphasis on how motor skills are acquired and retained, and on the application of social psychology and human motivation studies to human performance. Only 2 units of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 104. Only 2 units of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 105. Not open for credit to students who have completed Exercise Science 104 and 105. (Former Exercise Science 104 and 105.) GE credit: SocSci | SS.—I, II. (I, II.) Salitsky

103. Analysis and Control of Human Movement (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 101 and 101L, Physics 7A and 7B. Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 recommended. Introduction to functional anatomy, neurophysiological basis of motor control, and biomechanics of human movement. Human movement understood in the context of body structures, basic principles of physics, and functional characteristics of nerve and muscle. Only 1 unit of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 103. Only 3 units of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 104. Not open for credit to students who have completed Exercise Science 103 and 104. (Former Exercise Science 103 and 104.) GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—III. (III.) Williams

104L. Exercise Biology Laboratory (3)

Laboratory—3 hours; lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 101, 102, 103 (the last course may be taken concurrently). Principles and analytical procedures for assessing fundamental physiological, biomechanical, motor learning and motor control factors which underlie human movement and performance. Only 1 unit of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 101L. Only 1 unit of credit allowed to students who have completed Exercise Science 103. Not open for credit to students who have completed Exercise Science 101L and 103. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—I, III. (I, III.) Shaffrath

106. Human Gross Anatomy (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 2A; concurrent enrollment in course 106L or Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 101L strongly recommended. Upper division students only; Pass One open to upper division Exercise Biology or Anthropology majors only; Pass 2 open to Seniors in any major; Open enrollment at the start of the quarter for upper division students in any major. Detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the human body, with emphasis on function and clinical relevance to students entering health care professions. (Same course as Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 101.) GE credit: SciEng | SE.—II. (II.) Gross

106L. Human Gross Anatomy Laboratory (3)

Laboratory—9 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 2A; must take course 106 or Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 101 concurrently (or have already completed). Upper division students only; Pass One open to upper division Exercise Biology or Anthropology majors only; Pass 2 open to Seniors in any major; Open enrollment at the start of the quarter for upper division students in any major; mandatory attendance on first day of lab. Detailed study of prosected human cadavers in small group format with extensive hands-on experience. (Same course as Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 101L.) GE credit: SciEng | SE.—II. (II.) Gross

110. Exercise Metabolism (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 or Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior 101. Exercise metabolism, with emphasis on skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle metabolism during activity and inactivity. Basics of bioenergetics, substrate utilization, and cell signaling; mechanisms that regulate these properties, and differences between skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle metabolism. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—III. (III.) Gomes

111. Environmental Effects on Physical Performance (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion/laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 101 or consent of instructor. The effects of thermal, barometric and gravitational conditions on physiological function and physical performance of humans. Acute and chronic effects, emphasizing physiological adaptations and limitations, will be studied. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—II. (II.) Shaffrath

112. Clinical Exercise Physiology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 101 or consent of instructor. Physical activity as a therapeutic modality in normal and diseased populations (cardiovascular, pulmonary, diabetic). Effects of exercise and inactivity in terms of normal physiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic benefit. Exercise fitness and disease assessment methods. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—II. (II.) Harris, Shaffrath

113. Growth and Development in Human Performance (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Cell Biology and Human Anatomy 101, and Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101. Development of human performance potential from conception to old age, including influence of exercise, athletic participation, and preventive medicine. Alterations in motor skill patterns, morphology, and body composition, and physiological capacities with aging. GE credit: SciEng | SE.

115. Biomechanical Bases of Movement (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours to alternate weekly with discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 103 or consent of instructor. Biomechanical bases of human movement investigated; topics include musculo-skeletal mechanics, tissue mechanics, electromyography, and measurement and analysis techniques. Application made to sport, clinical, and work environments, including extensive analysis of locomotion. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, VL, WE.—I. (I.) Liets

116. Nutrition for Physically Active Persons (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101. The role of nutrition and exercise in modifying metabolism, body composition, performance and health of humans. GE credit: SciEng | SE.

117. Exercise and Aging in Health and Disease (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 101 or 113 (concurrently). Etiology of and standard therapy for various diseases associated with aging (e.g., cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal diseases, diabetes, obesity, lipemias, etc.). Exercise will then be considered as a protective and/or therapeutic modality. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—III. (III.) Shaffrath

120. Sport in American Society (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Sociological approaches to the study of sport and contemporary American culture, including sport interaction with politics, economics, religion, gender, race, media and ethics. Socialization factors involving youth, scholastic, collegiate, and Olympic sport. (Same course as Physical Education 120.) GE credit: SocSci, Div | SS.—I, III. (I, III.)

121. Advanced Sport Psychology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 102; Psychology 1 recommended. Advanced study and consideration of major theoretical and practical issues in sport psychology. Emphasis on practical application to sport and human performance.—Salitsky

122. Psychological Effects of Physical Activity (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 1; upper division standing. Physical activity is evaluated in terms of its ability to enhance the quality of life. Topics studied include: individual factors (self concept, type A); special populations (elderly, cardiovascular); and mental health changes (depression, anxiety).—Salitsky

124. Physiology of Maximal Human Performance (4)

Lecture—3 hours; practice—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 or permission of instructor; Biological Sciences 101, 102, and 103 recommended. Molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation to training. Learn how to exercise to maximize their own performance as well as learning how the frequency, intensity and timing of exercise and nutrition affect the molecular signals that underlie performance. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—II. (II.) Baar

125. Neuromuscular and Behavioral Aspects of Motor Control (3)

Lecture—2 hours; lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Factors which affect control of movement from neuropsychological, physiological, behavioral, and mechanical viewpoints. Topics include central vs. peripheral control mechanisms, open and closed loop theories, motor programming, cognitive learning strategies, and the effects of biochemical and biomechanical influences. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—Bodine

126. Tissue Mechanics (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 103 or Engineering 45 or consent of instructor. Structural and mechanical properties of biological tissues including bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, nerves, and skeletal muscle. (Same course as Biomedical Engineering 126.) GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL, WE.—II. (II.) Hawkins

148. Theory and Practice of Exercise Testing (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 112 (may be taken concurrently). Theory and practice of exercise testing applied to older adult populations. Physiological responses to and limitations of exercise testing. Application of exercise testing and training to healthy and diseased populations. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—Casazza

148L. Adult Fitness Testing Laboratory (1)

Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 148 (concurrently). Testing symptomatic and asymptomatic older adults for functional aerobic capacity, body composition, blood lipids, pulmonary function, and cardiovascular disease risk. Counseling adults in appropriate exercise programs and lifestyle modifications. Two quarters minimum; third quarter permitted. May be repeated two times for credit. (Former course Physical Education 148L) (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: QL, SE.—Casazza

179. Frontiers in Exercise Biology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: courses 101, 102 and 103 (may be taken concurrently); 104L recommended. Lectures by leading authorities and discussion of the latest research in newly emerging areas in exercise biology. Offered every fourth year. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—III.

189. International Perspectives in Exercise Biology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 10 or upper division standing in Exercise Biology; consent of instructor: students will be accepted based upon academic merit, personal experience, and academic discipline in order to provide multidisciplinary perspectives. Compare and contrast exercise science issues between the US and an international location. Identify political, economic, cultural, technological and environmental issues that impact human exercise, physical activity, wellness, and sport from a global perspective. Limited enrollment. Offered irregularly.

190C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing in Exercise Biology or related biological science and consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in course 199. Research findings and methods in exercise biology. Presentation and discussion of research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I. II, III. (I. II, III.)

192. Exercise Biology Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, dependent on availability of intern positions. Work experience in the application of physical activity programs to teaching, recreational, clinical or research situations under program faculty supervision. Written report required. May be repeated up to 15 units of credit, including course 92. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

194H. Research Honors (2)

Independent study—6 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing, minimum of 6 units of course 199, 3.500 GPA or greater in major courses, consent of honors thesis adviser. Completion of individual honors research project in Exercise Biology, under the guidance of an Exercise Biology faculty adviser, culminating in written honors thesis. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

197T. Tutoring in Exercise Biology (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing and consent of instructor. Assisting the instructor by tutoring students in exercise biology course-related projects. May be repeated up to 10 units of credit including courses 97T, 97TC and 197TC. No tutorial units will be counted towards the Exercise Biology major. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

197TC. Tutoring Exercise Biology in the Community (1-5)

Tutorial—3-15 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and chairperson. Tutoring in the community in exercise biology related projects under the guidance of the faculty. May be repeated up to 10 units of credit including courses 97T, 97TC, 197T. (P/NP grading only.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and chairperson. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of chairperson. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

Courses in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior (NPB)

Lower Division

10. Elementary Human Physiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Introduction to physiology for non-science majors. Includes basic cell physiology and survey of major organ systems and how they function in homeostasis and human health. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 101. GE credit: SciEng.—II. (II.) Bautista, Mogilner

12. The Human Brain and Disease (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Normal function and diseases of the human brain and nervous system. Diseases discussed include Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, leprosy, amnesia and schizophrenia. Intended for non-science majors. Not open for credit to students who have completed courses 100, 101, 112, or Psychology 121. GE credit: SciEng.—I. (I.) Cheng, Recanzone

14. Illusions: Fooling the Brain (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Introduction to perceptual processing in the human nervous system; illusions. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.—II. (II.) Ditterich

15. The Biology and Physiology of Aging (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Broad examination of age-associated changes in body functions. Includes basic cell physiology, a survey of major organ systems and the age-induced alterations in system function. Some age-associated diseases will also be examined. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 15V. GE credit: SciEng | SE.

15V. The Biology and Physiology of Aging (4)

Web virtual lecture—3 hours; web electronic discussion—1 hour. Broad examination of the biological and physiological basis of aging in animals and plants. Concepts in demographic, evolutionary, genetic, and cell aging. Major human organ systems, age-related alterations in system function, and age-related diseases. Intended for non-science majors. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 15. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—III. (III.) McDonald

68. Biology of Drug Addiction and Abuse (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Broad examination of addictive substances and their use/abuse. Topics include historical perspective, physiological effects, etiology, neurobiology of addiction and the impact of drugs on contemporary society. Intended for non-science majors. Not open for credit to students having completed course 168. GE credit: SciEng.—(III.) Bautista

90A. Lower Division Seminar: Issues in Body Weight Regulation (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing, consent of instructor. Critical examination of issues in body weight regulation through shared readings, discussions, written assignments, debates and oral presentations. Limited enrollment.—C. Warden

90B. Human Color Perception (2)

Seminar—2 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: lower division standing. The neural determinants of color appearance, and why we see the world in the way we do. Discussions center around demonstrations of color phenomena and what they tell us about the human brain. Limited enrollment.— Werner

90C. Current Issues in Animal Behavior (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing. The mechanisms and outcomes of sexual selection (mate choice and mate competition). Theory, current models and evidence that supports or refutes the models. Limited enrollment.—II. (II.) Hedrick

90D. Lower Division Seminar: Current Issues in Reproductive Endocrinology (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing. The integrative roles of reproductive hormones in mammalian reproduction and health. Current theory and models regarding hormone function and use in reproductive health and contraception, and evidence that supports or refutes the models. Offered irregularly.

90E. Biology of Aging (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: freshman standing. Current theories on the biology of aging covering genetic, biochemical, and physiological aspects. Emphasis on critical evaluation of controversial and contemporary issues. Offered irregularly.

90F. Visual Impairment and Blindness: A World Wide Problem (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing. Examination of various abnormalities of the eye and the important geographic and cultural factors that influence the epidemiology of those abnormalities. Offered irregularly.

91C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Lower division standing in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior or related biological science and consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in course 99. Research findings and methods in neurobiology, physiology, and/or behavior. Presentation and discussion of research by faculty and students. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

92. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: lower division standing; consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in the Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior. Internships supervised by a member of the faculty. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: lower division standing and consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: lower division standing and consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

 Upper Division

100. Neurobiology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1AB or 2ABC; Physics 9 ABC or 7ABC. Brains and nervous systems, neurons and neural circuits. Coordination of movement. Development of nervous systems. Vision, hearing, and feature extraction by the central nervous system. The cell biology of learning and memory. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 112, 160, 161 or 162, or Neuroscience 221 or 222. GE credit: QL.—I, II, III. (I, II III.) Carstens, Cheng, Miller, Sutter, Zito

100L. Neurobiology Laboratory (3)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion. Prerequisite: course 100 (may be taken concurrently). Experimental basis of neurobiology principles discussed in course 100. Topics include neurophysiology, sensory systems, motor systems, cellular neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, and quantitative data analysis and modeling techniques. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—III. (III.) Goldman

100Q. Quantitative Foundations of Neurobiology (1)

Autotutorial—1.5 hours; extensive problem solving—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 (may be taken concurrently). Computational methods and mathematical models used to study phenomena in neurobiology. Offered irregularly. GE credit: QL, VL.—Mogilner, Sutter

101. Systemic Physiology (5)

Lecture—5 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1A, or 2A and Chemistry 2B; Physics 1B or 7C strongly recommended. Systemic physiology with emphasis on aspects of human physiology. Functions of major organ systems, with the structure of those systems described as a basis for understanding the functions. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Bautista, Debello, Fuller, Furlow, Gomes, Ishida, Liets Usrey, Weidner

101L. Systemic Physiology Laboratory (3)

Laboratory—3 hours; discussion—2 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 101.Selected experiments to illustrate functional characteristics of organ systems discussed in course 101.—I, ll, III. (I, ll, III.) Bautista, Liets

102. Animal Behavior (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1A, 1B, 1C, or 2A, 2B, 2C. Basic principles of behavioral organization in vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Underlying physiological and ethological mechanisms. The evolution of behavior, with special emphasis on behavior under natural conditions. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 155. (Former course 155.) GE credit: SL.—II, III. (II, III.) Britten, Hahn, Nevitt

102Q. Quantitative Topics in Animal Behavior (1)

Autotutorial—1.5 hours; extensive problem solving—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16B; course 102 (may be taken concurrently). Study of the quantitative concepts and exemplar models used in animal behavior. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SciEng.—Hahn

103. Cellular Physiology/Neurobiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 103 or 105, and 104; Physics 7C recommended. Cellular physiology with emphasis on membrane transport processes and neuronal physiology. Fundamental physical-chemical and biological mechanisms of membrane transport will be considered in relation to cytoplasmic homeostasis, communication between cells, and the cellular mechanisms of sensory and motor transduction. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 100B (Former course 100B.) Offered irregularly.

104L. Cellular Physiology/Neurobiology Laboratory (4)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; term paper or discussion. Prerequisite: courses 101 and 101L; Biological Sciences 103 or 105. Experiments in the physical and chemical processes of cells and tissues. GE credit: Wrt.—II. (II.) Horwitz

105. Introduction to Computer Models (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16C or the equivalent, Physics 7C, Chemistry 2C, and course 100 or 101. Introduction to the ideas, mathematical techniques and computer tools required for developing models of cellular processes in physiology and neurobiology. Applications include membrane transport, ionic channels, action potentials, Ca2+ oscillations, respiration, and muscle contraction.Offered irregularly.

106. Experiments in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior: Design and Execution (3)

Laboratory—7.5 hours; discussion—0.5 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101 or 102, and 199 and consent of instructor. Design and execution of experiments in neurobiology, physiology, and/or behavior. Students choose and design a project in consultation with the sponsoring faculty member. May be repeated one time for credit to complete the project, with consent of instructor. An additional repeat is permitted for a different project under the guidance of another faculty member. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: OL, QL, VL, WE.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Rosenquist

107. Cell Signaling in Health and Disease (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 102 or 105. Basics of cell signaling pathways, their disruption in disease, and their current utility and future potential as therapeutic targets. Focus is on signaling pathways specific to nervous, endocrine and immune systems, and those fundamental to all cells. GE credit: SL.—II. (II.) Trimmer

111C. Advanced Systemic Physiology Laboratory (3)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: courses 101, 101L, Statistics 13; course 112, 113, or 114 recommended. Interfacing physiological recording equipment with microcomputers; data acquisition and analysis using the microcomputer; data interpretation within the framework of physiological concepts. Offered irregularly. GE credit: QL, VL, WE.

111L. Advanced Systemic Physiology Laboratory (4)

Lecture—1 hour; discussion—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: courses 101 and 101L. Selected comprehensive experiments in the autonomic nervous system and the cardiovascular, respiratory, and neuromuscular systems. Emphasis on conceptual and methodological approaches in demonstrating the physiology of organ systems. GE credit: Wrt.—II. (II.) Liets

112. Neuroscience (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101. Presentation of concepts in neuroscience including sensory systems, motor systems, and higher neural integration. Emphasis on mammalian nervous system. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SL.

113. Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Renal Physiology (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 101; Chemistry 8B, Physics 7B and 7C recommended. An intense and advanced presentation of concepts in cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology including discussion of acid-base balance.

114. Gastrointestinal Physiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101; Biological Sciences 105 or 103 recommended, 105 preferred. Gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. Digestion, secretion, absorption, motility, comparative physiology and pathology. Strong emphasis on neural and hormonal regulation and on cellular mechanisms of secretion and absorption.—I. (I.) Bautista, Horwitz

117. Avian Physiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1B, or 2A and 2B and Chemistry 2B; course 101 strongly recommended. Physiology of the various systems of birds with emphasis on digestion, respiration, excretion, and endocrine systems.—III. (III.) Hahn, Klasing

121. Physiology of Reproduction (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Physiological mechanisms related to reproduction, breeding efficiency and fertility, with special reference to domestic animals. GE credit: QL, SL.—II. (II.) Berger

121L. Physiology of Reproduction Laboratory (1)

Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 121 recommended (may be taken concurrently). Experiments on the reproductive systems of domestic animals including male and female gametes. (P/NP grading only.)—II. (II.) Berger

122. Developmental Endocrinology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Hormonal control of development, maturation and senescence from the cellular to organismal level, with emphasis on the human. Prenatal and neonatal life, childhood and adolescence, adulthood and pregnancy, as well as the endocrinology of aging. Offered irregularly.

123. Comparative Vertebrate Organology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 1A and 1B or 2A and 2B. Functional anatomy of major organ systems in vertebrates. Each system examined from cellular to gross level in fish, birds, and mammals. Emphasis on how differentiated cell types are integrated into tissues and organs to perform diverse physiological functions. (Same course as Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology 100.)—II. Ginetos

124. Comparative Neuroanatomy (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—2 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, or course 100 or 101. Overview of the neuroanatomy of the nervous system in a variety of mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates. Examine changes or modifications to neural structures as a result of morphological or behavioral specializations. (Same course as Psychology 124.) GE credit: SL.—II. (II.) Krubitzer, Recanzone

125. Comparative Physiology: Neurointegrative Mechanisms (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Comparisons of physiological functions in the animal kingdom: neurointegrative mechanisms of integration including aspects of phylogenetic development at both neuronal and systemic levels. Offered irregularly.

126. Comparative Physiology: Sensory Systems (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101. Basic physiological mechanisms involved in sensory systems. Comparative approach to considerations of mechanosensitive systems (audition, lateral lines, touch, echolocation, equilibrium), chemosensitive systems (olfaction, taste, pheromones), photosensitive systems (vision, infrared detection, UV detection), electroreception, and pain. Emphasis on receptors. Offered irregularly.

127. Comparative Physiology: Circulation (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Comparisons of physiological functions in the animal kingdom: circulation. Comparative approach to cardiovascular function in vertebrates and invertebrates. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SL, VL.

128. Comparative Physiology: Endocrinology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Comparison of physiological functions in the animal kingdom: animal hormones and their functions.—II. (II.) Furlow, Chang

129. Comparative Physiology: Respiration (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Comparisons of physiological functions in the animal kingdom: respiration.

130. Physiology of the Endocrine Glands (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 101. Advanced presentation of concepts in endocrinology with emphasis on the role of hormones in reproduction, metabolism, and disease. GE credit: VL.—I. (I.) Adams

132. Nature vs. Nurture: Physiological Interactions Among Genes, Nutrients and Health (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1A or 2A or consent of the instructor. Biochemical, physiological, genetic, and nutritional causes of important medical problems such as obesity, anorexia, heart disease and diabetes. One unit of credit allowed to students who have completed course 131. GE credit: SciEng.—I. (I.) Phinney, Warden

139. Frontiers in Physiology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: courses 100 and 101; 102 (may be taken concurrently). Lectures by leading authorities and discussion of the latest research in newly emerging areas in physiology. Offered every fourth year. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.

140. Principles of Environmental Physiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101; Biological Sciences 102 recommended. Physiological aspects of interactions of organisms and environmental, cellular, system, and organismal levels. Emphasis on regulatory responses/mechanisms to thermal, pressure, gravity and light environmental variables. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 148. (Former course 148.) GE credit: WE.—II. Fuller

141. Physiological Adaptation of Marine Organisms (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing; consent of the instructor; residence at Bodega Marine Laboratory required. Students must submit application available at http://www.bml.ucdavis.edu. Physiological adaptation to the environment among organisms in marine and estuarine habitats. GE credit: QL, VL, WE.—III. (III.) Chang, Cheng, Cherr

141P. Physiological Adaptation of Marine Organisms/Advanced Laboratory Topics (5)

Laboratory—12 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 141 concurrently; residence at
Bodega Marine Laboratory required. Students
must submit application available at http://
www.bml.ucdavis.edu. Training in scientific research from hypothesis to publication, including methods of library research. Research related to a topic covered in course 141. GE credit: VL, WE.—III. (III.) Chang, Cherr

150. Advanced Animal Behavior (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 102 or Psychology 101. Advanced integrative survey of biological principles of behavioral organization, emphasizing historical roots, current research directions, conceptual issues and controversies. Laboratory exercises on the description and analysis of the behavior of captive and free-living animals. (Same course as Psychology 122.) Offered irregularly.—Hahn

152. Hormones and Behavior (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 101, and either course 102 or Psychology 101. Endocrine physiology with an emphasis on the principles of behavior. Fundamental relationships between hormones and various behaviors engaged in by the organism during its lifetime. Role of hormones in behavioral homeostasis, social behavior, reproductive behavior, parental behavior, adaptation to stress. (Same course as Psychology 123.)—III. (III.) Bales, Furlow, Hahn, Trainor, Wingfield

159. Frontiers in Behavior (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: courses 100, 101, 102. Lectures by leading authorities and discussion of the latest research in newly emerging areas in behavioral biology. Offered every fourth year. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.

160. Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3)

Lecture—1.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: course 100, Biological Sciences 101 and consent of instructor. Selected topics in neurobiology. Topics include channel biophysics, action potential propagation, intracellular signal transduction pathways, synaptic physiology and quantal analysis, cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and neuromodulation of synaptic circuitry. (Same course as Neuroscience 160.) GE credit: VL.

160L. Advanced Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory (4)

Laboratory—12 hours. Prerequisite: course 160, Physics 7C recommended. Students will learn to record neural activity, to interpret their recordings, and to label neurons with antibodies against neurotransmitters.

161. Developmental Neurobiology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101. Issues, theoretical concepts, and methodologies in developmental neurobiology. Topics include prenatal and postnatal differentiation of neurons, and plasticity in the mature and aging brain. Integration of neurochemical, structural, physiological and behavioral perspectives. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—II. (II.) McAllister, Zito

162. Neural Mechanisms of Behavior (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101. The relationship between brain and behavior. Identification and analysis of the relevant neural circuits involved. Examples of systems to be considered are birdsong, locomotion, echolocation.—III. (III.) Britten

163. Systems Neuroscience (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or equivalent basic neuroscience training with consent of instructor. Concepts and techniques in systems neuroscience: e.g., measuring and manipulating neural activity, structure of neocortex, sensory processing, motor control, short-term and long-term storage of information, neural codes, neural mechanisms underlying cognitive functions. GE credit: SE.—III. (III.) Ditterich

164. Mammalian Vision (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 100, 112, or Psychology 101. Structure and function of the mammalian visual system, from the formation of images on the retina through visually guided behavior and perception. Emphasis on biological mechanisms underlying vision.—II. (II.) Britten, Werner

165. Neurobiology of Speech Perception (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101, or consent of instructor. Interdisciplinary approach to speech perception with emphasis on functional neuroanatomy and behavior. Topics include auditory processing in time and space, intelligibility in noisy environments, visual speech, evolution of vocal communication, models of speech perception, development, and hearing impairment. GE credit: SL.—III. (III.) Miller

166. Math Tools for Neuroscience (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or permission of instructor; Math 16A, B, C or equivalent; Physics 7C strongly recommended. Introduction to mathematics techniques used in neuroscience. Applications to neuroscience of differential equations, linear algebra, Fourier transforms, correlation and convolution, and probability theory. GE credit: QL.—Goldman

167. Computational Neuroscience (5)

Lecture—4 hours; lecture/laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or permission of instructor; Math 17A, 17B, 17C, or equivalent; Physics 7A, B, C or equivalent strongly recommended; consent of instructor. Mathematical models and data analysis techniques used to describe computations performed by nervous systems. Lecture topics include single neuron biophysics, neural coding, network dynamics, memory, plasticity, and learning. Lab topics include programming mathematical models and data analysis techniques in MATLAB. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, QL.—(I.) Goldman

168. Neurobiology of Addictive Drugs (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 101 or the equivalent. Neurobiological basis for the effects and mechanisms of action of drugs with addictive potential, including opiates (morphine, heroin, methadone), amphetamines, cocaine, nicotine, marijuana (cannabinoids), alcohol, caffeine, and mind-altering drugs such as LSD and antidepressants. GE credit: SL, VL.—III. (III.) Liets

169. Frontiers in Neurobiology (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: courses 100 and 101, course 102 (may be taken concurrently). Lectures by leading authorities and discussion of the latest research in newly emerging areas in neurobiology. Offered every fourth year. Offered irregularly. GE credit: QL.

190C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior or related biological science and consent of instructor; concurrent enrollment in course 199. Research findings and methods in neurobiology, physiology, and/or behavior. Presentation and discussion of research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: completion of 84 units and consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in neurobiology, physiology, & behavior. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

194HA-194HB-194HC. Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior–Honors (1-4-2)

Laboratory—3-12 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing; minimum 3.500 GPA in courses counted toward major; approval by the Master Adviser. Honors project in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior. Laboratory research on a specific question. The project is developed with the sponsoring faculty member and approved by the student’s Honors Thesis Committee. Honors thesis to be submitted upon completion of the project. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

197T. Tutoring in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior (1-5)

Discussion—2-6 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing and consent of instructor. Assisting the instructor by tutoring students in one of the Department's regular courses. May be repeated for credit.
(P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.)

 Graduate

211. Advanced Topics in Neuroimaging (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 210 or consent of instructor. Restricted to 16 students. Critical presentation and discussion of the most influential advanced issues in neuroimaging, emphasizing fMRI design/analysis and the integration of fMRI with EEG/MEG. (Same course as Neuroscience 211 and Psychology 211.) (S/U grading only.)—II. (II.) Miller

212. Light and Fluorescence Microscopy (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to maximum 16 students. Theory and practical application of light and fluorescence microscopy in the biological sciences. (S/U grading only.)—II. (II.) Zito

217. Advanced Avian Physiology (1)

Project—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing and concurrent enrollment in course 117; consent of instructor. Study in depth of a topic in avian physiology through development of a lecture with associated instructional materials such as lesson plan, readings, presentation, and evaluation aids.—III. (III.) Millam

222. Systems Neuroscience (5)

Lecture—4 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Integrative and information-processing aspects of nervous system organization. Topics include sensory systems, motor function, sensorimotor integration, the limbic system, and the neurobiology of learning and memory. (Same course as Neuroscience 222.)—II. (II.)
DeBello, Ditterich, Usrey

245. Computational Models of Cellular Signaling (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Computational and mathematical techniques in modeling of regulatory and signaling phenomena in neurobiology and cell physiology, focusing on linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equation models. Applications include ion channel kinetics, electrical activity, signal transduction, calcium oscillations, and simple neural circuits. Offered irregularly.

247. Topics in Functional Neurogenomics (2)

Lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. The theory, methods and principles of functional neurogenomics with emphasis on the relationship to molecular mechanisms involved in development and disease of the nervous system. (Same course as Neuroscience 247.)

261A. Topics in Vision: Eyes and Retinal Mechanisms (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, course 100 or 112 or the equivalent. Structure and function of the visual system, with emphasis on the eye and retina, including optics, anatomy, transduction, retinal synapses, adaptation, and parallel processing. (Same course as Neuroscience 261A and Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology 261A.) (S/U grading only.)—(I.) Ishida

261B. Topics in Vision: Systems, Psychophysics, Computational Models (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, course 261A recommended. Functions of the central visual pathways and their underlying mechanisms. Recent research on aspects of anatomy, biochemistry, electrophysiology, psychophysics, development, and genetics of the visual system. (Same course as Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 261B and Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology 261B.) (S/U grading only.) Offered in alternate years.—(II.) Britten

261C. Topics in Vision: Clinical Vision Science (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 261A and 261B or consent of instructor. Causes and mechanistic bases of major blinding diseases. Recent research on aspects of anatomy, biochemistry, electrophysiology, psychophysics, development, and genetics of the visual system related to disease. (Same course as Neuroscience 261C and Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology 261C.) Offered irregularly. (S/U grading only.)—(III.) Werner

263. Modeling in Systems Neuroscience (4)

Lecture—3 hours; lecture/laboratory—1 hour. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Modeling as a tool in systems neuroscience. Mathematical techniques will be introduced and used to explore advanced topics in echolocation, sound localization, electroreception, communications, and motor systems. Other topics include transforms, modeling assumptions, scales and linearity. Offered in alternate years.

267. Computational Neuroscience (5)

Lecture—4 hours; lecture/laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general neuroscience at the level of course 100; one year college-level Calculus at level of Math 16A, B, C; one year Physics at the level of Physics 7A, B, C, strongly recommended; students from other departments should contact the instructor. Mathematical models and data analysis techniques used to describe computations performed by nervous systems. Lecture topics include single-neuron biophysics, neural coding, network dynamics, memory, plasticity, and learning. Lab topics include programming mathematical models and data analysis techniques in MATLAB. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Neuroscience 267.)—(I.) Goldman

270. How to Write a Fundable Grant Proposal (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in a life science and consent of instructor. Familiarization with the skills required to craft a successful grant proposal submitted to extramural agencies such as NIH and NSF.

285. Literature in Visual Neuroscience (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Literature in Visual Neuroscience. (Same course as Neuroscience 285.) May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Britten, Ditterich, Goldman, Usrey

287A. Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics in theoretical neuroscience. Topic varies each year. Fall quarter (287A): foundational material from books and review articles. Spring quarter (287B): continuation of year's topic through readings of seminal articles from the primary literature. Offered in alternate years. May be repeated for credit. (Same course as Neuroscience 287A.) (S/U grading only.)—I. Ditterich, Goldman

287B. Topics in Theoretical Neuroscience (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics in theoretical neuroscience. Topic varies each year. Fall quarter (287A): foundational material from books and review articles. Spring quarter (287B): continuation of year's topic through readings of seminal articles from the primary literature. May be repeated for credit. (Same Course as Neuroscience 287B.) (S/U grading only.)—III. Ditterich, Goldman

291. Auditory Neuroscience (1)

Seminar—0.5 hours; discussion—0.5 hours. Prerequisite: course 100 or 112 or Neuroscience 222 or the equivalent. Exploration of various important aspects of auditory physiology, behavior and psychophysics through review of original literature. New topic each quarter. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Recanzone, Sutter

 
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Updated: July 11, 2014 9:42 AM