Jump to content

Courses in Nutrition (NUT)

Lower Division

10. Discoveries and Concepts in Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Nutrition as a science; historical development of nutrition concepts; properties of nutrients and foods. Not open for credit to students who have taken an upper division course in nutrition. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Applegate

11. Current Topics and Controversies in Nutrition (2)

Discussion—1.5 hours; term paper. Exploration of current applications and controversies in nutrition. Students read scientific journal articles and write summaries, as well as give brief oral presentations. Topics change to reflect current interests and issues. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | OL, SE, WE.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) 

99. Individual Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

Upper Division

104. Environmental & Nutritional Factors in Cellular Regulation and Nutritional Toxicants (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 101; Biological Sciences 103 or Animal Biology 103. Cellular regulation from nutritional/toxicological perspective. Emphasis: role of biofactors on modulation of signal transduction pathways, role of specific organelles in organization/regulation of metabolic transformations, major cofactor functions, principles of pharmacology/toxicology important to understanding nutrient/toxicant metabolism. (Same course as Environmental Toxicology 104.) GE credit: SciEng | OL, SE, SL.—S. (S.) Haj, Oteiza

105. Nutrition and Aging (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY and Animal Biology 103 or the equivalent. Role of nutrition in the aging process from both an organismal/cell perspective, including demographics, theories of aging, nutrition and evolution, nutritional manipulation and life-span extension, and nutrition's impact on the diseases of aging. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (S.) 

111B. Recommendations and Standards for Human Nutrition (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 8B; Neurology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 or the equivalent, course 111AV or 111AY. Critical analysis of the development of nutritional recommendations for humans. Topics include history of modern recommendations, development of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) and other food guides; the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI); administrative structure of regulatory agencies pertinent to nutrition recommendations; introduction to scientific methods used to determine the recommendations; food labeling laws; nutrition recommendations in other countries and cultures. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 111.—S. (S.) Zidenberg-Cherr

111AY. Introduction to Nutrition and Metabolism (3)

Web virtual lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Chemistry 8B; Neurology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 or the equivalent. Restricted to upper division or graduate level students only. Introduction to metabolism of protein, fat and carbohydrate: the biological role of vitamins and minerals; nutrient requirements during the life cycle; assessment of dietary intake and nutritional status. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 101 or 111AV. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) 

112. Nutritional Assessment (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Biology 102 and 103 or course 101, Nutrition 111AV or 111AY, Statistics 13. Restricted to upper division or graduate level Nutrition students only. Methods of human nutritional assessment, including dietary, anthropometric, biochemical methods. Principles of precision, accuracy, and interpretation of results for individuals and populations. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—S. (S.) Satre, Stewart

113. Principles of Epidemiology in Nutrition (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Plant Sciences 120 or equivalent. Introduction to epidemiology as it relates to the field of nutrition, including study design, principles of epidemiologic inference, criteria for causality, and interpreting measures of disease risk. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—F. (F.) Stewart

114. Developmental Nutrition (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Biology 102 and 103; course 111AV or 111AY, 111B. Role of nutritional factors in embryonic and postnatal development. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE.—W. (W.) Keen

115. Animal Nutrition (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 8B or 118B or consent of instructor. Comparative differences among animals in digestion and metabolism of nutrients. Nutrient composition of feeds, digestive systems, digestion, absorption, feeding strategies. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | OL, QL, SE, SL, VL, WE.—W. (W.) DePeters

116A. Clinical Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY, 111B, 112; Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 or the equivalent. Biochemical and physiological bases for therapeutic diets. Problems in planning diets for normal and pathological conditions. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F. (F.) Steinberg

116AL. Clinical Nutrition Practicum (3)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 116A (may be taken concurrently). Fundamental principles of planning and evaluating therapeutic diets and patient education for pathological conditions covered in 116A. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F. (F.) Frank

116B. Clinical Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY, 111B, 112; Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 or the equivalent. Biochemical and physiological bases for therapeutic diets. Problems in planning diets for normal and pathological conditions. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) Zivkovic

116BL. Clinical Nutrition Practicum (3)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 116AL, and 116B (may be taken concurrently). Fundamental principles of planning and evaluating therapeutic diets and patient education for pathological conditions covered in 116B. Continuation of course 116AL. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—W. (W.) 

117. Experimental Nutrition (6)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—6 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY, 111B, 112, Biological Sciences 102, 103; Molecular and Cellular Biology 120L or other laboratory course in biochemistry is recommended. Methods of assessing nutritional status. Application of chemical, microbiological, chromatographic and enzymatic techniques to current problems in nutrition. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SE, WE.—F. (F.) Gaikwad

118. Community Nutrition (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY, 111B, and 116A. Nutrition problems in contemporary communities and of selected target groups in the United States and in developing countries. Nutrition programs and policy, principles of nutrition education. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.—W. (W.) Heinig

119A. International Community-Based Nutritional Assessment (1)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 112 (may be taken concurrently) and consent of instructor. Issues and problems related to community-based nutritional assessment in a low-income country, major nutritional problems in low-income countries; ethical issues in human investigation; survey design, data collection techniques, and data analysis; preparation for international travel; cross-cultural communication, health, and safety while living abroad.

119B. International Community-Based Nutritional Assessment (6)

Lecture—2 hours; fieldwork—12 hours. Prerequisite: course 119A and consent of instructor. Restricted to upper division students in Clinical Nutrition, Community Nutrition, Dietetics, and Nutrition Science. A six-week summer course in Peru. Implementation of a community-based nutritional assessment survey, including development of the survey instrument, selection of the study sample, collection and verification of data, and analysis and interpretation of the results; the project will be carried out by paired participation of students and faculty members of UC Davis and the collaborating foreign institution.

120AN. Nutritional Anthropology (4)

Lecture—3 hours, discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 10 and Anthropology 2 recommended. Nutritional anthropology from historical and contemporary perspectives; the anthropological approach to food and diet; field work methods; case histories that explore food patterns and their nutritional implications. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Div | SE, SS.—Su. (Su.) Kurtz

120BN. Nutritional Geography (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Nutritional geography from historical and contemporary perspectives; the geographical approach to food and diet; cultural and environmental factors that influence dietary practices; food-related landscapes and patterns. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Div | SE, SS.

122. Ruminant Nutrition and Digestive Physiology (4)

Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 2A, 2B, 2C; Animal Biology 103 or Biological Sciences 103; Animal Science 100 or Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101 or consent of instructor; Mathematics 16B recommended. Study of nutrient utilization as influenced by the unique aspects of digestion and fermentation in ruminants, both domestic and wild. Laboratories include comparative anatomy, feed evaluation, digestion kinetics using fistulated cows, computer modeling, and microbial exercises. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—S. (S.) Fadel

123. Comparative Animal Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Biology 103 or Biological Sciences 103. Restricted to upper division and graduate level students. Comparative nutrition of animals; including laboratory, companion, zoo, and wild, animals. Digestion and metabolic adaptations required for animal species to consume diverse diets. Relation of nutrition to metabolic adaptations and physiological states, including growth, reproduction, and diseases. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—S. (S.) Klasing

123L. Comparative Animal Nutrition Laboratory (1)

Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Biology 103 or Biological Sciences 103. Laboratory exercises leading to written reports on establishment of nutritional requirements and formulation of complete diets for laboratory, companion, zoo and wild animals.—S. (S.) Klasing

124. Nutrition and Feeding of Finfishes (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Biology 103 or Biological Sciences 103. Principles of nutrition and feeding of fishes under commercial situations; implication of fish nutrition to the environment and conservation of endangered species. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE, SL.

127. Environmental Stress and Development in Marine Organisms (10)

Lecture—4 hours; laboratory—12 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Environmental Toxicology 101 or Biological Sciences 102 or 104 or the equivalent; Environmental Toxicology 114A or course 114 recommended. Course taught at Bodega Marine Laboratory. Effects of environmental and nutritional stress, including pollutants, on development and function in embryos and larvae of marine organisms. Emphasis on advanced experimental methods. (Same course as Environmental Toxicology 127.) GE credit: SciEng | OL, QL, SE, SL, VL, WE.—Su. (Su.) Cherr

129. Journalistic Practicum in Nutrition (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY, 111B; a course in written or oral expression or consent of instructor. Critical analysis and discussion of current, controversial issues in nutrition; the use of journalistic techniques to interpret scientific findings for the lay public. Students will be required to write several articles for campus media. Course may be repeated one time for credit. GE credit: SciEng | OL, SE, SL, WE.

130. Experiments in Nutrition: Design and Execution (2)

Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; course 111AV, 111AY, 111B or 114 recommended. Experiments in current nutritional problems. Experimental design: students choose project and, independently or in groups of two-three, design a protocol, complete the project, and report findings. May be repeated for credit up to six times (three times per instructor) with consent of instructor. GE credit: SciEng | SE.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.)

190. Proseminar in Nutrition (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 111AV or 111AY, 111B. Restricted to senior standing. Discussion of human nutrition problems. Each term will involve a different emphasis among experimental, clinical, and dietetic problems of community, national and international scope. May be repeated two times for credit with consent of instructor. GE credit: SciEng | OL, SE, VL.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Zidenberg-Cherr

190C. Nutrition Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing in Nutrition or related biological science; consent of instructor. Introduction to research findings and methods in nutrition. Presentation and discussion of research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: one upper division course in nutrition and consent of instructor. Work experience on or off campus in practical application of nutrition, supervised by a faculty member. (P/NP grading only.)

197T. Tutoring in Nutrition (1-2)

Discussion/laboratory—3 or 6 hours. Prerequisite: Nutrition Science, Clinical Nutrition or related major; consent of instructor. Tutoring of students in nutrition courses, assistance with discussion groups or laboratory sections, weekly conference with instructor in charge of course: written evaluations. May be repeated if tutoring a different course. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SE.

Graduate

201. Vitamin and Cofactor Metabolism (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one upper division nutritional biochemistry and physiology course. Review of studies and relationships involving the metabolic functions of vitamins. Comparative nutritional aspects and the metabolism and chemistry of vitamins and vitamin-like compounds.

203. Advanced Protein and Amino Acid Nutrition (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one upper division nutritional biochemistry and physiology course. Nutritional significance of protein and amino acids, including studies of the influence of dietary protein on digestion, absorption, metabolism, resistance to disease, and food intake. Study of dietary requirements and interrelationships among amino acids.

204. Mineral Metabolism (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: upper division nutrition or biochemistry course. Studies of metabolic functions and nutritional interrelationships involving minerals.

219A. International Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; undergraduates only admitted with consent of instructor after completion of course 111AV. Epidemiology, etiology, and consequences of undernutrition, with particular focus on the nutritional problems of children and women in low income populations. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Dewey

219B. International Nutrition (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 219A. Intervention programs to prevent or ameliorate nutritional problems in low-income populations. Planning, implementing, and evaluating nutrition intervention programs. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Dewey

230. Experiments in Nutrition: Design and Execution (2)

Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; courses 201, 202, 203, 204, or the equivalent recommended. Student selected projects to enhance laboratory skills. Independently, or in groups of two-three students, design a protocol, carry out the project, analyze the results and report the findings. May be repeated for credit up to six times (limit of three times per instructor) with consent of instructor.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

250. Metabolic Homeostasis (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: passing the Nutrition Graduate Group Preliminary Examination or consent of instructor. Preference given to students with advanced standing in the Nutrition Graduate Group. Regulatory mechanisms of carbohydrate, lipid, and protein homeostasis; mechanisms of metabolic enzyme regulation and of the metabolic hormones; homeostatic mechanisms and interactions; fuel-fuel interactions; nutrition energy balance.

251. Nutrition and Immunity (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology 126, Medical Microbiology 107 or the equivalent, Animal Biology 102. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying interactions of nutrition and immune function, including modulation of immunocompetence by diet and effects of immune responses on nutritional needs. Lectures and discussion explore implications for resistance to infection, autoimmunity and cancer. Offered in alternate years.—W. Klasing, Erickson, Stephensen

252. Nutrition and Development (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 201, 202, 203, 204. Relationship of nutrition to prenatal and early postnatal development.—W. (W.) Keen, Oteiza

253. Control of Energy Balance and Body Weight (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 210A or 210B or consent of instructor. Comprehensive study of the biochemical, nutritional and physiological mechanisms controlling food intake, body composition and energy expenditure. Subject matter will be approached through lectures and discussions where students and staff will critically evaluate the literature.

254. Applications of Systems Analysis in Nutrition (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 202, Physiological Sciences 205A-205B or the equivalent. Quantitative aspects of digestion and metabolism; principles of systems analysis. Evolution of models of energy metabolism as applied in current feeding systems. Critical evaluations of mechanistic models used analytically in support of nutritional research.

257. Selected Topics in Nutritional and Hormonal Control of Nitrogen Metabolism (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: courses 201 through 204; Physiological Sciences 205A-205B or the equivalent. Quantitative and qualitative aspects of nitrogen metabolism; critical evaluation of dietary intake, hormones and diet-hormone interactions which affect nitrogen metabolism, including protein synthesis-degradation, amino acid synthesis-catabolism, nitrogen transport-excretion, depending on current literature.

258. Field Research Methods in International Nutrition (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Issues and problems related to implementation of nutrition field research in less-developed countries, including ethics; relationships with local governments, communities, and scientists; data collection techniques and quality assurance; field logistics; research budgets; and other administrative and personal issues. Offered in alternate years.—W. Dewey

259. Nutrition and Aging (2)

Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: three of courses 201, 202, 203 and 204. Interaction between nutrition and aging. Topics include physiological/biochemical basis of aging, age-related changes affecting nutritional requirements, nutrition and mortality rate, assessment of nutritional status in the elderly, and relationship between developmental nutrition and the rate of aging.

260. Nutrition During Pregnancy (6)

Lecture—5 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Master's Degree program of Advanced Studies in Maternal and Child Nutrition. Overview of the anatomical, physiological and biochemical changes that occur during pregnancy and early development. Discussion and evaluation of nutritional/lifestyle factors associated with pregnancy outcomes and nutrition programs/interventions for pregnant women.—F. (F.) Heinig

261. Lactation and Infant Nutrition (6)

Lecture—5 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 260. Restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program; Nutrition graduate students by consent of instructor. Overview of the physiological and biochemical processes underlying human lactation and nutritional needs of both mother and infant. Development of skills in assessment, nutrition counseling, education and support of new mothers and their families.—W. (W.) Heinig

262. Child and Adolescent Nutrition (6)

Lecture—5 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 261. Restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program; Nutrition graduate students by consent of instructor. Relationships among nutrition, growth, and development during childhood and adolescence. Nutritional assessment for normal and high risk groups; psychological, social, and economic factors contributing to nutritional status. Nutritional needs and interventions for special groups, including obese children/adolescents, athletes, and eating disordered.—S. (S.) Heinig

263. Applied Research Methods in Maternal and Child Nutrition (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program; Nutrition graduate students by consent of instructor. Application of epidemiological principles to the study of maternal and child nutrition. Topics include quantitative and qualitative study procedures, including study design, data collection, and related analytical techniques.—(F.) Heinig

264A. Current Topics in Maternal and Child Nutrition: Principles of Adult Education (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program; Nutrition graduate students by consent of instructor. Current scientific literature related to Maternal and Child Nutrition in adult education settings. Topics include methods and theories of adult education and critical thinking skills related to research evaluation. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Heinig

264B. Current Topics in Maternal and Child Nutrition: Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Practice (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program; Nutrition graduate students by consent of instructor. Current scientific literature related to Maternal and Child Nutrition. Topics include epidemiology, evidence-based practice, breast feeding promotion, and nutritional assessment of populations. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Heinig

264C. Current Topics in Maternal and Child Nutrition: Public Policy Development and Implementation (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Restricted to students enrolled in the MAS program; Nutrition graduate students by consent of instructor. Current scientific literature related to Maternal and Child Nutrition. Topics include nutrition surveillance and monitoring, as well as public policy development and implementation. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Heinig

270. Scientific Ethics in Biomedical Studies: Emphasis on Nutrition (3)

Lecture—1 hour; discussion—1 hour; term paper. Restricted to graduate standing or consent of instructor. Scientific ethics in biomedical studies, especially nutrition. Discussion and case study presentations on scientific integrity, fraud, misconduct, conflict of interest, human and animal research protections. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 492B.—Steinberg

290. Beginning Nutrition Seminar (2)

Lecture/discussion—1 hour; seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: first year graduate standing. Discussion and critical evaluation of topics in nutrition with emphasis on literature review and evaluation in this field. Students give oral presentations on relevant topics.—F. (F.) 

290C. Research Conference (1)

Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Major professors lead research discussions with their graduate students. Research papers are reviewed and project proposals presented and evaluated. Format will combine seminar and discussion style. (S/U grading only.)—F. (F.)

291. Advanced Nutrition Seminar (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: second-year graduate standing. Advanced topics in nutrition research. Multiple sections may be taken concurrently for credit. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

293A. Current Topics in Obesity, Food Intake and Energy Balance (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or course 129. Undergraduates with upper division standing with at least one writing course may enroll with consent of instructor. Current research and its evaluation. Principles of experimental design and scientific background for given article. Articles summarized for posting on Internet for use by healthcare professionals. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

293B. Current Topics in Obesity, Food Intake, and Energy Balance with Special Topics (3)

Lecture—1 hour; seminar—1 hour; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or course 129. Undergraduates with upper division standing with at least one writing course may enroll with consent of instructor. A continuation of course 293A, with additional special topics. May be repeated for credit up to 3 times with consent of instructor.

294A. Current Topics in Developmental Nutrition (2)

Seminar—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 114 or 252 or consent of instructor. Restricted to graduate standing or consent of instructor. Effects of nutrition on embryology, morphogenesis, and developmental mechanisms. May be repeated for credit when topic differs.—F. (F.) 

297T. Supervised Teaching in Nutrition (1-3)

Teaching under faculty supervision—3-9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in nutrition or consent of instructor. Practical experience in teaching nutrition at the university level; curriculum design and evaluation; preparation and presentation of material. Assistance in laboratories, discussion sections, and evaluation of student work. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

298. Group Study (1-5)

F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Professional

492A. Professionalism: An Academic Perspective (2)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. For graduate students in their initial quarter of residence. Professionalism topics are presented and examples drawn from both the biological and social sciences.

492C. Grant Writing (3)

Lecture—1.5 hours; discussion—1.5 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Nutrition or consent of instructor. Preparation of grants for governmental agencies (particularly NIH and USDA) and private foundations. Students will write a research grant or fellowship application. May be repeated one time for credit with consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years.

Page content manager can be reached at Catalog-Comment@ucdavis.edu.


Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM