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Courses in Plant Pathology (PLP)

Lower Division

40. Edible Mushroom Cultivation (2)

Lecture—1 hour; laboratory/discussion—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 10 or Microbiology 20 recommended. Principles and practices of growing edible mushrooms, including culture maintenance, basic mushroom substrate preparation, composting, spawn generation techniques, inoculation methods, harvesting, and pests and pest management.—W. (W.) 

90. Introduction to Global Disease Biology (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Introduction to the Global Disease Biology major, research and internship opportunities, and potential career paths in human, animal, and plant health. Communication, ethics and the nature of science. (P/NP grading only.)—F. (F.) Rizzo

Upper Division

101. Epidemiology (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Science and Society 13; Biological Science 2A, 2B, 2C; Statistics 13, 100 or Plant Sciences 120. Principles and practice of epidemiology as applied to human, animal, and plant populations and the environment in which these populations co-exist. Quantitative analysis of both infectious and non-infectious disease. Inter-dependence between epidemiological analysis, decision-making and policy formulation will be highlighted. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—W. (W.) McRoberts, Papageorgiou

102. Disease Intervention and Policy (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; project. Prerequisite: course 101; Science and Society 13; Biological Sciences 2A, 2B, 2C; Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology 129Y; Medicine and Epidemiology 158. Examination of the prevention and treatment of diseases affecting humans, animals, and plants. Case studies will illustrate the merits of a unified approach to promoting health at local, regional, and global scales. GE credit: SciEng | OL, SE, SL.—S. (S.) Rizzo

103. The Microbiome of People, Animals, and Plants (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 2A, 2B, 2C. Examination of the structure and function of microbial communities that live inside and on host organisms. Introduction to general concepts of the microbiome and microbiota, and their relationship to host health and disease. GE credit: SciEng | QL, SE.—F. (F.) Cook, Leveau

120. Introduction to Plant Pathology (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1C; Microbiology 102 recommended. The nature, cause, and control of plant diseases.—F, S. (F, S.) Casteel, Epstein

123. Plant-Virus-Vector Interaction (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 2A, Biological Sciences 101; Plant Biology 105, course 120, and Entomology 100 recommended. Analysis of interactions necessary for viruses to infect plants.Interactions among insect vectors and host plants involved in the plant-virus life cycle. Evolutionary aspects of the molecular components in viral infection and modern approaches to the interdiction of viral movement. (Same course as Entomology 123 and Plant Biology 123.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SE, SL, WE.—(F.) Lucas, Gilbertson, Ullman

130. Fungal Biotechnology and Biochemistry (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Plant Biology 119, Biological Sciences 103. How fundamental physiological and biochemical activities of fungi impact the destructive and beneficial roles of these organisms in nature. Utilization and manipulation of fungi for biotechnological and industrial applications.—W. (S.) Stergiopolous

135. Field Identification of Mushrooms (1)

Field work; three-day mandatory field trip. Prerequisite: introductory course in biological sciences; course in mycology recommended. Collection and identification of mushrooms and other fleshy fungi based on macro and microscopic features. (P/NP grading only.)—W. (W.)  

140. Agricultural Biotechnology and Public Policy (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: high school level biology, including genetics; Biological Sciences 10 recommended. Examination of the development and deployment of agricultural biotechnologies, particularly transgenic crop plants, microorganisms and animals, with consideration of conventional agriculture, public perceptions of technologies, food safety, environmental impact, public policies and regulations. GE credit: SciEng, Wrt | SL.—S. (S.) Cook

148. Introductory Mycology (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1A, 1B, 1C. Limited enrollment. Systematics, ecology, evolution, and morphology of fungi. Importance of fungi to humans. (Same course as Plant Biology 148.) GE credit: SE.—F. Rizzo

150. Fungal Ecology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 1C or equivalent. The ecological roles of fungi as saprobes, mutualists and parasites in native and managed ecosystems. Physiological and reproductive strategies associated with adaptations to diverse habitats.—W. (W.) Gordon

185. Advanced Mushroom Taxonomy (2)

Laboratory/discussion—3 hours; fieldwork—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 135 or 148, and Biological Sciences 101 or the equivalent. Class size limited to 12 students. Microscopic and molecular methods used in the identification of mushroom species; molecular characterization including PCR-amplification of ribosomal nuclear DNA, digestion of the product with restriction enzymes, and DNA sequencing; a one-day field trip is required. Offered in alternate years.—F. 

192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: course 120 and consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus, supervised by a member of the faculty. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Graduate

201A. Impacts, Mechanisms and Control of Plant Disease (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 120, graduate student status in the Plant Pathology Graduate Program, or consent of instructor. A case-studies approach to analysis of plant diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and viruses, including impacts, etiology, pathogen taxonomy and epidemiology, biochemical and genetic aspects of pathogen-host interactions, virulence and resistance, and approaches to disease control.—W. (W.) Leveau

201B. Impacts, Mechanisms and Control of Plant Disease (3)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 120, course 201A, and graduate student status in the Plant Pathology Graduate Program, or consent of instructor. A case-studies approach to analysis of plant diseases, including emerging diseases, caused by bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and oomycetes: impacts, etiology, pathogen taxonomy, epidemiology, biochemical and genetic aspects of pathogen-host interactions, virulence, resistance, disease control and statistical analysis. Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) McRoberts

205A. Diseases of Vegetable and Field Crops (3)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; fieldwork—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 120. Clinical study of diseases of vegetable and field crops with emphasis on etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and control. Field trips required. Offered in alternate years.—S. Gilbertson

205B. Diseases of Vegetable and Field Crops—Summer Field Trip (1)

Fieldwork—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses 120 and 205A. Continuation of course 205A— four-day field trip investigating diseases of vegetable and field crops (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence. S/U grading only.)—Su. (Su.) Gilbertson

206A. Diseases of Fruit, Nut, and Vine Crops (3)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 120; Plant Biology 119. Course 205 may be taken concurrently. Clinical study of fruit, nut, and vine crops diseases with emphasis on etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and control. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.) Offered in alternate years.—S. (S.) Kirkpatrick

206B. Diseases of Fruit, Nut, and Vine Crops (1)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 120; Plant Biology 119. Course 205 may be taken concurrently. Clinical study of fruit, nut, and vine crops diseases with emphasis on etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and control. Offered in alternate years. (Deferred grading only, pending completion of sequence.)—Su. (Su.) 

210. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plant–Microbe Interaction (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences 101, 102, 103, and 104, or the equivalent. Discussion of plant–microbe interactions, focused on the underlying cellular, biochemical, and molecular events that determine the diseased state.—W. (W.) Bostock, Coaker

217. Molecular Genetics of Fungi (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in a biological science, Biological Sciences 101, 103, Molecular and Cellular Biology 161, Plant Biology 119, courses 130, 215X; Microbiology 215 recommended. Advanced treatment of molecular biology and genetics of filamentous fungi and yeasts, including gene structure, organization and regulation; plant pathogenesis; secretion; control of reproduction; molecular evolution; transformation; and gene manipulation. (Same course as Biological Chemistry 217.) Offered in alternate years.—W. 

224. Advanced Mycology (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 148 or Plant Biology 148 or consent of instructor. Systematics, evolution, and ecology of the fungi. Topics include modern techniques and theories on classification of fungi, species concepts, sexual compatibility and vegetative compatibility. Laboratories emphasize various approaches to fungal identification. Offered in alternate years.—S. Epstein, Rizzo

228. Plant Bacteriology (5)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—9 hours. Prerequisite: course 120; Microbiology 2 or the equivalent; Biological Sciences 102, 103. Study of bacteria which have a saprophytic, symbiotic, or parasitic association with higher and lower plants. Clinical and molecular methods for identification and classification of these bacteria. Offered in alternate years.—(F.) Kirkpatrick, Gilbertson

230. Plant Virology (3)

Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: upper division or graduate course in molecular biology or graduate student in plant pathology. Viruses as causal agents of plant disease and as tools for manipulating plants; structures of virus particles; mechanisms of transmission, replication, and spread in the plant; cytology and molecular biology in susceptible and resistant reactions to virus infection; virus disease control. Only 2 units of credit to students who have completed Microbiology 262. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 226. Offered in alternate years.—W. Bruening, Falk

290. Seminar (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Review and evaluation of current research in plant pathology. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

290C. Advanced Research Conference (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 120 or consent of instructor. Presentation, evaluation, and critical discussions of research activities in the area of advanced plant pathology; primarily designed for graduate students. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

291. Seminar in Molecular Plant Pathology (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 120 or consent of instructor. Review and evaluation of current literature and research in biochemistry and molecular biology of plant microbe interactions. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W. (F, W.) Bostock, Coaker, Cook, Gilchrist, VanAlfen

295. Seminar in Mycology (1)

Seminar—1 hour. Review and evaluation of current literature and research in mycology. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—S. (S.) Rizzo

298. Special Group Study (1-5)

299. Research (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM