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Courses in Science and Technology Studies (STS)

Lower Division

1. Introduction to Science, Technology and Medicine Studies (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. History, philosophy, sociology, politics, and cultural studies of science, technology, and medicine. Emphasis on a broad range of perspectives. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci | SS, WE.—Carroll

20. Methods in Science, Technology and Medicine Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 1 recommended. Methodological issues concerning the historical, philosophical, sociological, ethical, and political analysis of science, technology, and medicine. Detailed case studies to illustrate different methods of analysis. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—Carroll

32. Drugs, Science and Culture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Drugs, politics, science, society in a cultural perspective: emphasis on roles of science, government and the media in shifting attitudes toward alcohol, marijuana, Prozac and other pharmaceuticals; drug laws, war on drugs and global trade in sugar, opium, cocaine. (Same course as Anthropology 32.) GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS, VL.—Dumit

40A. Media History 1, Gutenberg to Oppenheimer (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—2 hours; extensive writing. History of Media to 1945, with particular focus on mechanically reproduced mass media technologies including the printing press, the newspaper, photography, cinema, radio and early computing technology. Analysis of inter-related cultural and political topics. (Same course as Cinema and Technocultural Studies 40A.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.—F. (F.)

40B. Media History 2 1945-Present (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 40A. History of media from 1945 to present, with particular focus on the development of the computer, digital network and internet technologies in the context of other media infrastructures like radio, television and satellite networks. Analysis of inter-related cultural/political topics. (Same course as Cinema & Technocultural Studies 040B.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.—F. (F.)

50. Ancient Science (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16A or the equivalent. Study of science in ancient Greece and Rome; consideration of its social context; concentration on the basic concepts of physics, the world of medicine and biology, the history of mathematics, and the practices of astronomy, astrology and meteorology. (Same course as Classics 50.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, WC, WE.—Webster

51. Ancient Medicine (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion–1 hour. Medicine in ancient Greece and Rome; physiological conceptions of the body within scientific and social frameworks; exploration of sanitation technology and health in antiquity; medical treatment of the female body; medicine and the economy. (Same course as Classics 51.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: AH, WC, WE.—Webster

92. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in the program in Science & Technology Studies under the supervision of a member of the faculty. May be repeated up to 12 units for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

98. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor (P/NP grading only.) GE credit: SS.

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

108. Intellectual Property in Science (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 1, or other Social Science or Humanities writing course. Historical and conceptual framework for contemporary debates about intellectual property and science. Topics include US patent system and copyright law, interaction between patents and industrial policy, credit in academic and industrial science, role of IP in global knowledge. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, SS, WE.—Biagioli

109. Visualization in Science (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. course 1 or 20 or Anthropology 2 recommended. Anthropological approaches to scientific visualization techniques, informatics, simulations. Examination of different visualization techniques toward understanding the work involved in producing them, critical assessment of their power and limits, especially when visualizations are used socially to make claims. (Same course as Anthropology 109.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, VL, WE.—Dumit

120. Religion, Magic and Science (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Religion, magic, and science from the middle ages to the present. Contrast between modern scientific methodology and religious and magical thinking. (Same course as Religious Studies 120.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt | AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.—Coudert

121. Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 recommended. Introduction to critical medical anthropology. Topics include anthropological analysis of bio-medicine, psychiatry, systems of knowledge and healing, the body, emotions, and clinical encounters in a cross-cultural perspective. (Same course as Anthropology 121.) GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS, WC, WE.—Giordano

129. Health and Medicine in a Global Context (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 recommended. Recent works in medical anthropology and the science studies of medicine dealing with global health issues such as AIDS, pandemics, clinical trials, cultural differences in illnesses, diabetes, organ trafficking, medical technology and delivery, illness narratives, and others. (Same course as Anthropology 129.) GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | SS.—Dumit

130A. From Natural History to the History of Nature (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: History 135A recommended. Evolution and demise of natural history as a discipline from Aristotle to Linnaeus. Considers ancient views of nature and its Renaissance rediscovery; the emergence of biology, botany, geology, and zoology; the history of taxonomy and classification. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt | AH or SE, WE.

130B. History of Modern Biology (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 130A recommended. Development of modern biology from pre-Darwinian roots to the present. Considers emergence of modern biological specialities and consolidation of biological theory around evolutionary ideas. History of allied fields such as genetics, paleontology, embryology, ecology, systematics and molecular biology. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt | AH or SE, WE.

131. Darwin (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instructor. Students will explore the life and times of Charles Darwin and will trace the development of evolutionary thinking before and after the Origin of Species to appreciate its place in Victorian society and in the corpus of Darwin's thought. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt | AH or SE, WE.—Griesemer

150. Gender and Science (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. An interdisciplinary approach to the relations between gender and science. Topics include the biological and cultural construction of sexual difference, the role of women as practitioners of science, and feminist approaches to science. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt | ACGH, DD, SS, WE.

151. Media Theory (5)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—1 hour; film viewing—3 hours; extensive writing. Critical and theoretical approaches to the emergence of new technologies since the invention of photography. Examine various approaches to media (formalist, semiotic, structuralist, Frankfurt School, cybernetics, visual and gamer theory). (Same course as Cinema and Technocultural Studies 150.) GE credit: AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.

160. Ghosts of the Machine: How Technology Rewires our Senses (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Historical, aesthetic and critical approaches to how information technologies produced ghost effects or a sense of terror in response to new media like the photograph, gramophone, film, typewriter, computer, Turing Machine. Focus on technological media transforms sense perception. Offered in alternate years. (Same course as Technocultural Studies 160.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, VL, WE.—Ravetto-Biagioli

161. Time: Mechanism and Measurement (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 1. Cultural concepts of time; units and instruments of time measurement; historical differences in the social organization of time; and time measurement in twentieth-century science. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.

162. Surveillance Technologies and Social Media (4)

Lecture—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: Technocultural Studies 1 or course 20. Study of the ubiquitous presence of CCTV, face recognition software, global tracking systems, biosensors, and data mining practices that have made surveillance part of our daily life. Exploration of the boundary between security and control, information and spying. (Same course as Cinema & Technocultural Studies 162.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ACGH, AH or SS, OL, VL, WE.—Ravetto

163. History of Communication Technologies (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. History of communication technologies from the late Middle Ages to the 20th century. Questions of technology, knowledge, power and culture. Particular attention to questions about information and truth. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.

164. Writing Science (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: English 3 or course 1, or equivalent. Texts and writing practices in the production of scientific knowledge. Surveys the literary structure of scientific arguments; history of scientific genres; rhetoric and semiotics in scientific culture; graphical systems in the experimental laboratory; narratives of science, including science fiction. (Same course as English 164.) Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, SL, WE.—Milburn

165. Built Environments (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing. Built environments, which are designed to support forms of life. Their role as carriers of cultural memory and in turning knowledge of nature into social assets. Historical constellations of knowledge, social order, and power. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS.

172. Video Games and Culture (4)

Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: course 1 or Technocultural Studies 1 or English 3 or equivalent. Critical approaches to the study of video games, focusing on formal, historical, and cultural modes of analysis. History of software and hardware in North American and global contexts. Relations of games to society, politics, economics, literature, media, and the arts. (Same course as Cinema and Technocultural Studies 172 and English 172.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | ACGH, AH or SS, VL.

173. Science Fiction (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 1 or English 3 or equivalent. Literary modes and methods of science fiction. Representative texts, authors, and themes of the genre—e.g., time travel, alternative universes, and utopias. Relations of science fiction to science, philosophy, and culture. (Same course as English 173.) GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt | AH, WE.

175. Laboratory Studies Lab (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instructor. Hands- on training in Science and Technology Studies fieldwork, interviewing, archival research and data analysis. Review of laboratory studies literature, informed consent procedures, ethics, and care of the data. Individual and group projects possible. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.

176. Sociology of Knowledge, Science, and Scientific Knowledge (4)

Lecture—3 hours; term paper or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Sociology 1, 2, or 3 recommended. Social, cultural, and historical dimensions of knowledge, especially scientific knowledge. Problems, methods, and theory in sociology of scientific knowledge. Laboratory and historical case studies. Scientific and technical knowledge in institutional and organizational contexts. (Same course as Sociology 176.) GE credit: SocSci |  SS.—Carroll

180. Topics in History and Philosophy of Science (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course in History and Philosophy of Science or other coursework relevant to topic. In depth treatment of selected topics in the history and philosophy of science. Possible topics include history of modern physics, history of molecular biology, science and society, science and power, scientific explanation, technology and culture, theory testing. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

190. Seminar in Science, Technology and Medicine Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: open to junior and senior Science and Technology Studies majors only. Intensive reading, discussion, research and writing by small groups in selected topics of science, technology, and medicine studies scholarship. Emphasis on individual research projects.

192. Internship (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Work experience off and on campus in all subject areas offered in the program in Science & Technology Studies under the supervision of a member of the faculty. May be repeated three times for up to 12 units for credit. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

Graduate

200. Theories and Methods in Science & Technology Studies (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Theories and methods of Science & Technology Studies as a field of critical and empirical scholarship, and examination of various contexts in which STS has emerged worldwide. May be repeated one time for credit with consent of instructor.

298. Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)

299. Research (1-12)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)

Professional

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM