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Courses in Communication (CMN)

Students must have satisfied the Entry Level Writing requirement before taking any course in Communication.

Lower Division

1. Introduction to Public Speaking (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Practice in the preparation and delivery of speeches based on contemporary principles and strategies of informing and persuading audiences. GE credit: Wrt | OL, WE.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Shubb

3. Interpersonal Communication Competence (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Communication in interpersonal contexts. Sender, receiver, and message variables, and their interaction with communication competence. Participation in simulations and experiential exercises. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Hamilton

5. Global English and Communication (4)

Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. English as a global language and its uses in intercultural communication. Cultural, historical, and political dimensions of varieties of English spoken around the world. Experiential grounding in strategies for increasing interpretive and verbal communicative competence for a globalized world. (Same course as Linguistics 5.) GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci | AH or SS, OL. WC.—W. (W.) Farrell, Feng, Ramanathan

10Y. Introduction to Communication (4)

Web virtual lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Basic principles of communication and communication processes; models of communication; foundations of empirical research in communication; contexts of communication and communication research including interpersonal, intercultural, news, entertainment, mediated, and others. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Taylor

12Y. Data Visualization in the Social Sciences (4)

Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—1.5 hours; web virtual lecture—1.5 hours. Introduction to quantitative data across the social sciences (Communications, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and other disciplines). Transforming data, describing data, producing graphs, visual reasoning, and interpretations. (Same course as Sociology 12Y, Political Science 12Y, Psychology 12Y.) GE credit: QL, VL.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Cross

76. Video Games and Virtual Environments (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Impact of video games on players and society. Topics include motivations for playing games; cognitive, emotional, and behavioral effects, including violence and addiction; interpersonal and group processes in online games; virtual communities; and video games for education. GE credit: SocSci | SS, VL.—F. (F.) Peña

99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

Upper Division

101. Communication Theories (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Forms, functions, development, and testing of communication theory, with emphasis on social scientific approaches. Survey and comparison of significant micro and macro theories and models of face-to-face and mediated communication. Application of theories to real world problems. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Feng

102. Empirical Methods in Communication (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Statistics 13 or equivalent. Social scientific research methods commonly employed in Communication. Topics include research design, measurement, sampling, questionnaire construction, survey research, experimental design, evaluation research, content analysis and qualitative field methods. GE credit: SocSci | QL, SS.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Bell, Palomares, Yegiyan

110. Communication Networks (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Theoretical approaches to communication networks, practical applications of network studies, and network analysis tools. Topics include friendship, political discussion, social support, organizational, social media, and disease transmission networks. Impact of emerging technologies on network creation, maintenance, and expansion. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F. (F.) Barnett, Shen

111. Gender Differences in Communication (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Examination of communication differences between men and women as sources of male/female stereotypes, misunderstandings, dilemmas, and difficulties (real and imagined). Treatment of genders as cultures. Topics include male/female differences in discursive practices and patterns, language attitudes, and relationship dynamics. Not open for credit to students who have taken Communication 103. GE credit: SocSci | DD, SS.—F, W. (F, W.) Palomares

112. Theories of Persuasion (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Theories and models of persuasion that account for the effects of source, channel and audience factors on message recipients. Examination of message strategies for altering attitudes and gaining compliance. Contexts of application include interpersonal relationships, advertising, politics, and health. Not open for credit to students who have taken Communication 152. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W. (F, W.) Bell, Puckering

114. Communication and Cognition (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Relationship between communication and cognition in interpersonal and mediated contexts. Models of discourse comprehension and production, the influence of language attitudes on social judgments, and the effects of information processing on decision making are explored. Not open to students who have completed course 138. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Yegiyan

120. Interpersonal Communication (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Theories and principles of interpersonal communication related to perception, verbal and nonverbal channels, mutual understanding, and relationship development. Communication processes in face-to-face and technologically-mediated encounters. Consideration of different relationship contexts, including friendships, dating and family relationships, and the workplace. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 134. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Feng, Puckering

121. Language Use in Conversation (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Examination of how people use language in social interaction, how they exchange meaning during conversation, and how their use of language plays a central role in turn-taking, speech acts, attitude formation, figurative speech, politeness, and other aspects of conversation. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 105. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W. (F, W.) Palomares

122. Nonverbal Communication (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Examination of the interaction between nonverbal communication and verbal communication channels in influencing outcomes in interpersonal relationships. Underlying functions served by nonverbal communication are considered. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 135. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, S. (F, S.) Puckering

123. Intercultural Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Major concepts and theories of intercultural communication. Topics include cultural similarities and differences in verbal and nonverbal communication; dimensions of cultural variations, barriers to intercultural communication, and intercultural communication competence. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 137. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Feng

130. Group Communication (4)

Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Statistics 13 or equivalent. Communication processes in the development and maintenance of effective groups and teams in organizations. Examination of both face-to-face and computer-mediated group interaction. Topics include group development, power, norms, cohesion, decision making, problem solving, creativity, conflict management, working remotely, and leadership. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F. (F.) 

131. Strategic Communication in Public Relations (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Principles, evolution, and professional practice of public relations. Planning and execution of effective, ethical communication strategies and campaigns. Distribution of messages through traditional and new media, including social media. Cultivation of relationships between organizations and their publics. Crisis communication management. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F. (F.) Barnett

136. Organizational Communication (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Organizational communication theory and practice is examined with an emphasis on the use of effective communication strategies for achieving organizational goals. GE credit: SS.—F, W, Su. (F, W, Su.) Barnett, Hamilton

139. Advanced Organizational Communication (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 136. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Communication processes within and among social organizations. Examines formal organizations as information processing systems. Topics include general systems theory, input-output analysis, structural-functionalism, cybernetics, organizational network analysis, organization environments, organizations as cultures, organizational learning, information technologies, and communication diagnostic/auditing strategies. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.—S. (S.) Barnett

140. Introduction to Mass Communication (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. History of mass media and media research traditions. Organization and economics of the media industry. Media policy, law, regulation and ethics. Impact of the media on individuals and society. Traditional, new and emerging communication technologies. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Cho, Taylor, Yegiyan

141. Media Effects: Theory and Research (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 140. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Social scientific studies of the effects of mass media messages on audience members' actions, attitudes, beliefs, and emotions. Topics include the cognitive processing of media messages, television violence, political socialization, cultivation of beliefs, agenda-setting, and the impact of new technologies. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—W, S. (W, S.) Cho, Taylor

142. News Policies, Practices and Effects (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 102 (or equivalent course in research methods), course 140. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Exploration of processes and constraints in the gathering, editing, and reporting of news. Examination of studies on the effects of news, contemporary challenges to news reporting presented by new technologies, and the relationship of news to other social institutions. GE credit: SocSci | ACGH, SS.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Theobald

143. Analysis of Media Messages (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 102 (or equivalent course in research methods), course 140. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Examination of alternative approaches to the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of media messages, including those disseminated through broadcasting, print, and new technologies. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | ACGH, SS, Wrt.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) Cho

144. Media Entertainment (4)

Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 102 (or equivalent course in research methods), course 140. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Effects and appeal of media entertainment, emphasizing emotional reactions. Topics include key concepts of entertainment research such as mood management, and the respective features and emotional/social-psychological effects of genres such as comedy, mystery, thriller, sports, music, horror, and erotica. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.—S. (S.) Taylor

145. Political Communication (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 102 or equivalent course in research methods and course 140. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Discussion of theories and research on the relationships among the mass media, citizens, and politics, production of political news, campaign strategies, and citizens' attitudes and behaviors Provides frameworks for mediated politics, the news, and elite discourse and campaign messages. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SocSci | ACGH, SS.—Cho

146. Communication Campaigns (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours; term paper. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Strategic uses of media and interpersonal communication channels in health, environmental advocacy, and political campaigns. Emphasis on general principles relevant to most campaign types, including public information, social marketing, and media advocacy campaigns. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Barnett, Theobald

148. Contemporary Trends In Media (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication Major only. Global trends in media, including media and globalization, impacts of the new media economy, media and security, and effects of ownership on media content and culture. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—Barnett, Theobald

161. Health Communication (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Health communication theories and research, including a review of research on health literacy, social support and coping, doctor-patient interaction, health communication campaigns, and media influences on health. Application of new communication technologies in health promotion. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Bell

165. Media and Health (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 102 or equivalent course in research methods. Content and effects of health messages in news, entertainment, and advertising. Topics include health news reporting; portrayals of disease, disability, death and health-related behaviors; representations of health professionals; promotion of drugs and other health products; tobacco and alcohol advertising. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Bell, Taylor

170. Digital Technology and Social Change (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Conceptual understanding of how digital communication technologies transform our lives through social media, mobile connectivity, globalization, and big data. Contexts of application include education, health, entrepreneurship, democracy, and poverty. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Hilbert, Theobald

170V. Digital Technology and Social Change (4)

Web virtual lecture—3 hours; web electronic discussion—1 hour. Conceptual understanding of how digital technologies transform our lives, through social media, mobile connectivity, globalization, big data, and artificial intelligence. Context of course include education, health, entrepreneurship, democracy, among others. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 170. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) Hilbert

172. Computer-Mediated Communication (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Pass One open to Communication majors only. Theories and research pertaining to how people use technologies for interpersonal purposes. Impression formation, self-presentation, long-distance romantic relationships, online dating, deception, anonymity, maintaining friendships, and transmitting emotions in online contexts. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) Peña

174. Social Media (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Application of theories of communication to the study and design of social media. Examination of social media in various contexts such as health, political movements, and collaboration. Topics include motivations for membership, participation, virality, social-technical capital, and privacy. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—F, S. (F, S.) Shen

176. Video Games Theory and Research (4)

Lecture/discussion—2 hours; laboratory/discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: course 102 or an equivalent research methods course. Communication theory and research on the uses and effects of video games. Research methods available for investigating game use and the impact of games on behavior. Application of those methods in a research project. GE credit: SS.—W. (W.) Peña

180. Current Topics in Communication (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 101 and 102 (or equivalent research methods course). Pass One open to Communication majors only. Group study of a special topic in communication. May be repeated one time for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly. GE credit: SocSci | SS.—S. (S.) 

189A. Proseminar in Social Interaction (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 101, 102, 136; consent of instructor. Open to Communication majors only. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in the specialty of social interaction. Potential topics include relationship initiation, maintenance, and deterioration; communication failure; nonverbal communication; conversational management; semantics and pragmatics of languages; and family/marital communication. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—S. Feng, Palomares

189B. Proseminar in Mass Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 101, 102, 140; consent of instructor. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in the specialty of mass communication. Potential topics include, agenda-setting, the cultivation of beliefs, television violence, media portrayals of underprivileged groups, mediated political discourse, interactive technologies, and international/global communications. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—S. Berger, Cho, Hwang, Taylor, Yegiyan

189C. Proseminar in Health Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 101; 102; 161 or 165; consent of instructor. Open to Communication majors only. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in health communication. Potential topics include health communication design and evaluation, media advocacy, physician-patient interaction, uses of communication technologies in health settings, and health-related advertising. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—S. Bell, Feng, Taylor

189D. Proseminar in Organizational Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 101, 102, 136; consent of instructor. Open to Communication majors only. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in the specialty of organizational communication. Potential topics include organizational networks, organizational conflict and its resolution, mediation, bargaining and negotiation, superior-subordinate interaction, leadership styles, and inter-organizational communication. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt | SS, WE.—S. Barnett

192. Internship in Communication (1-12)

Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: communication majors who have completed 20 units of upper division communication courses; consent of instructor. Open to Communication majors only. Supervised work experience requiring the application of communication principles and strategies or the evaluation of communication practices in a professional setting. Relevant experiences include public relations, advertising, sales, human resources, health promotion, political campaigns, journalism, and broadcasting. May be repeated up to 6 units of credit. (P/NP grading only.)—F, W, S, Su. (F, W, S, Su.) 

194H. Senior Honors Thesis (4)

Seminar—1 hour; individual tutoring on research project—3 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing and approval by Honors Committee. Directed reading, research, and writing culminating in the preparation of honors thesis under direction of faculty adviser. GE credit: SocSci | SS, WE.

197T. Tutoring in Communication (2-4)

Seminar—1-2 hours; laboratory—1-2 hours. Prerequisite: upper division standing with major in Communication and consent of Department Chairperson. Tutoring in undergraduate Communication courses, including leadership of discussion groups affiliated with departmental courses. May be repeated for credit up to a total of six units. (P/NP grading only.)

198. Directed Group Study (1-5)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)

199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)

(P/NP grading only.)

Graduate

201. Theoretical Perspectives on Strategic Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Explores the intentional use of discourse and nonverbal behavior to reach goals. Explores theories and models that elucidate the processes that enable the realization of intentions in message plans and discourse.—F. (F.) 

202. Communication Theory Construction (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; graduate standing. Alternative meta-theoretical perspectives for theory generation in communication inquiry. Processes of construct explication, operationalization and theory construction. Emphasis on the critique of extant communication theories and the development of theory construction skills. Offered irregularly.—S. Barnett

203. Scientific Methods for Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: 201, 202, Psychology 204A, 204B or equivalent. Social scientific research methods commonly employed in Communication. Topics include research design measurement sampling questionnaire construction survey research experimental design evaluation research content analysis and qualitative field methods.—S. (S.) Palomares, Yegiyan

210. Experimental Methods and Analysis in Communication (4)

Lecture—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; one course in inferential statistics; consent of instructor. Experimental designs in communication. Topics include: causation; threats to validity; conceptualization, operationalization, and measurement; hypothesis testing; ethics; data analysis software focusing on the analysis of variance and planned contrasts; and the practical and effective implementation and writing of experiments.—F. (F.) Palomares

211. Survey Research Methods in Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; one course in inferential statistics; consent of instructor. Methods for designing personal interview, phone, mail, and web-based surveys in communication. Topics include: sampling strategies, sources of error and bias in survey designs, questionnaire construction, cognitive interviewing, interviewer behavior, and analysis of complex survey data using standard software packages.—W. (W.) Bell, Cho

220. Persuasion Theories and Message Design (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Major social scientific theories and perspectives on attitude change and persuasion. Application of persuasion theories and principles to persuasive message design in applied contexts.—S. (S.) 

221. Communication and Cognition (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Explores the cognitive structures and processes that enable the production, comprehension and interpretation of messages in face-to-face and mediated communication contexts. Explores the communication outcomes associated with these processes. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Yegiyan

222. Risk Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Theories and models of individual risk information processing. Media depictions of threats and risk-related information and their potential effects on audiences. Implications for the design and implementation of messages concerning threat and risk. Offered irregularly.—S. (S.) 

230. Social Interaction Theory and Research (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Survey of theories and research on social interaction and interpersonal communication. Covers communication codes, individual differences in communication, communication and relationship development, family communication, conflict, cognitive and emotional processes underlying social interaction, social influence, intercultural communication, and nonverbal behavior.—W. (W.) Feng, Palomares

231. Tactics of Interpersonal Influence (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Achievement of interpersonal goals in social interaction. Topics include message production; tactics, strategies and planning; anticipating potential obstacles; resisting and thwarting goals; plan recognition; and goal detection. Examined goals include compliance gaining, attitude change, ingratiation, information seeking, comforting, and deception. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) 

232. Health Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Health communication theories and research traditions. Topics include consumer health information seeking; physician-patient interaction; information, social marketing, "edutainment," and media advocacy campaigns; social networks and coping; media influences on health; and new communication technologies in health promotion and healthcare delivery. (Same course as Pubic Health Science 232.) Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Bell

233. Communication in Medicine (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Restricted to graduate standing. Survey of research on communication between patients and health care providers. Topics include verbal and nonverbal behavior, power and influence, empathy and support, and conflict management. Cultural, social, organizational, and technological influences on communication are examined. Offered in alternate years.—W. Bell

234. Intercultural Communication (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Restricted to graduate standing. Theories and research on intercultural communication. Topics include national, racial, and ethnic similarities and differences in communication practices; cultural beliefs and values; identity and conflict; and technological influences on intercultural communication. Methodological issues in intercultural communication research are also examined. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Peña

243. Media and Health (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Restricted to graduate standing. Survey of research on media and health. Topics include health news coverage; depictions of health, illness and disability in entertainment; health campaigns; advertising of health products and services; and the influence of gaming and other new media on health behaviors. Offered irregularly.—W. (W.) Bell, Taylor

244. Organizational Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. Theory and research on communication processes in organizations.—Barnett

250. Mediated Communication Theory and Research (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Survey of major theories on the intended and unintended effects of mediated communication. Topics include media's effects on learning, political behavior, interpersonal violence, sexual socialization, consumer behavior, race relations, gender socialization, and cultural processes.—W. (W.) Cho, Taylor, Yegiyan

251. Digital Technology and Social Change (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Conceptual, theoretical, and international consideration of how digital communication technologies transform social organization and development. Topics include social media, big data, political revolutions, e-democracy, digital divide, e-education, e-health, entrepreneurship, public policies, poverty reduction, technological innovations, microfinance, and entertainment. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Hilbert

252. Computer-Mediated Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. The effects of computer-mediated communication on the ways in which people express themselves, form impressions about strangers, develop and maintain relationships, collaborate on group work, and expand social network, especially in comparison to face-to-face communication. Offered in alternate years.—(S.) Peña

254. Communication Campaigns (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Strategic uses of media and interpersonal channels to promote social change through social marketing, information, and media advocacy campaigns. Focus on theory-based interventions in a variety of applied contexts. Offered in alternate years.—(W.) Barnett, Bell

255. Social Media (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Theoretical, conceptual and analytic issues pertaining to social media research. Topics include motivation, participation, virality, and social-technical capital. Examination of social media in various contexts. Introduction to online behavioral data collection and analysis methods. Offered in alternate years.—F. Shen

256. Communication Perspective on Video Games (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Review of theory and research on the uses and effects of video games and virtual environments developed for entertainment and education. Study of the research methods available for documenting and measuring game use and effects on behavior. Offered in alternate years.—S. Peña, Shen

259. Cognitive Approaches to Media (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Restricted to graduate standing. Interdisciplinary examination of cognitive approaches to mediated communication. Application of studies on mediated message processing, cognitive and emotional information processing, psychophysiology, and neuroscience to mass communication. Review of media research and methods on attention, memory, motivation, and limited capacity. Offered in alternate years.—W. Yegiyan

270. Diffusion of Innovations (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Communication processes by which information and innovations spread through social systems. Models of diffusion, including spatial, network, time dependent, semantic and cognitive frameworks. Impact of communication technologies on diffusion. Practical application of diffusion models in a variety of contexts. Offered in alternate years.—W. Barnett, Hilbert

271. Communication Networks (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Theoretical, conceptual, and analytic issues pertaining to network perspectives on communicating and organizing. Consideration of both structural and dynamic features of communication networks. Examination of the impact of emerging technologies on communication networks. Introduction to network analysis software.—S. (S.) Barnett, Shen

280. Special Topics in Social Interaction (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in the specialty of social interaction. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly.—S. Feng, Palomares

281. Special Topics in Mediated Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in the speciality of mediated communication. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly.

282. Special Topics in Health Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Reading, discussion, research and writing on a focused topic in health communication. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly.—S. 

283. Special Topics in Organizational Communication (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; consent of instructor. Reading, discussion, research, and writing on a selected topic in the specialty of organizational communication. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered irregularly.

298. Group Study (1-5)

Lecture—3 hours. (S/U grading only.)

299. Individual Study (1-12)

(S/U grading only.)

299R. Thesis Research (1-12)

Independent study—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Communication. (S/U grading only.)

Professional

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—Theobald

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Updated: March 22, 2017 10:38 AM